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Discipline

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Student Learning Outcomes

Discipline: Sociology, Philosophy
Course Name Course Number Objectives
Introduction to Race and Ethnicity SOC 20
  • Students will know major concepts of race and ethnicity.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will use sociological research concepts and theories to identify and analyze the social constructions of race and ethnicity, its interactions with different aspects of society, and its impact on the experiences of different racial/ethnic groups.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
  • Students will use sociological research concepts and theories to identify and analyze the social constructions of race and ethnicity, its interactions with different aspects of society, and its impact on the experiences of different racial/ethnic groups.
Introduction to Race and Ethnicity - Honors SOC 20H
  • Students will know major concepts of the sociology of race and ethnic relations.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students will use sociological research concepts and theories to identify and analyze the social constructions of race and ethnicity, its interactions with different aspects of society, and its impact on the experiences of different racial/ethnic groups.
Asian American Communities SOC 36
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will be able to describe with clarity a change in cultural attitudes over time.
Child Development SOC 15
  • Students will be able to apply a sociological understanding physical growth and social, emotional, and cognitive development from conception to adolescence across all major concepts of child development.
  • Students will be able to apply a sociological understanding of the various social and environmental forces that shape child development.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will know major concepts of child development.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
Critical Analysis and Writing ?Honors PHIL 9H
  • Students will be able to evaluate arguments (strong/weak, valid/invalid). (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to develop a thesis statement that advances a clear argument. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will learn to analyze informal fallacies. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to identify the premises/reasons for supporting the conclusion within an argument. (Revised 6/2020)
  • Students will demonstrate proficiency (precision, clarity, organization) in argumentative writing (with a minimum of 6,000 words for the semester), where positions are defended, and ideas are explored. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to distinguish inductive and deductive arguments. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students completing an assignment in Critical Analysis and Writing Honors course will be able to develop a thesis statement that advances a clear argument.
Critical Thinking PHIL 8
  • Students will be able to evaluate arguments (strong/weak, valid/invalid). (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to apply problem-solving skills to their personal belief systems and social issues. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to identify the premises/reasons for supporting the conclusion within an argument. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will learn to analyze informal fallacies. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to distinguish inductive and deductive arguments. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students completing an assignment in Critical Thinking will be able to develop a thesis statement that advances a clear argument.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
Critical Thinking and Logical Writing PHIL 9
  • Students will be able to evaluate arguments (strong/weak, valid/invalid). (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to develop a thesis statement that advances a clear argument. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will learn to analyze informal fallacies. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will demonstrate proficiency (precision, clarity, organization) in argumentative writing (with a minimum of 6,000 words for the semester), where positions are defended, and ideas are explored. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to identify the premises/reasons for supporting the conclusion within an argument.
  • Students will be able to distinguish inductive and deductive arguments. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students completing an assignment in Critical Thinking and Logical Writing will be able to develop a thesis statement that advances a clear argument.
  • Students will take an embedded surveys to identify their knowledge of Evaluating Arguments (Strong/weak, Cogent/Uncogent; Valid/Invalid, Sound/Unsound).
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
Ethics PHIL 12
  • Students will be able to analyze major philosophical schools of thought, including Virtue Ethics, Deontological Ethics, and Utilitarianism. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to apply moral reasoning to contemporary ethical issues and moral problems. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to analyze primary texts in ethics. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to analyze the ideas of the major moral philosophers. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will identify philosophers (such as Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche, Sartre) and their ethical systems.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast various ethical systems (including Deontological, Teleological, Virtue Ethics).
  • Students completing an assignment in Ethics will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their ethics coursework.
Ethics - Honors PHIL 12H
  • Students will be able to analyze major philosophical schools of thought, including Virtue Ethics, Deontological Ethics, and Utilitarianism. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to apply moral reasoning to contemporary ethical issues and moral problems. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to analyze primary texts in ethics. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to analyze the ideas of the major moral philosophers. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to identify both culture and its influence on human expression.
  • Students will be able to identify the different Ethical Systems (Deontological, Teleological, Virtue Ethics)
  • Students will identify knowledge of Philosophers and their Ethical systems
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students will identify philosophers (such as Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche, Sartre) and their ethical systems.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast various ethical systems (including Deontological, Teleological, Virtue Ethics).
History of Western Philosophy PHIL 20A
  • Students will be able to analyze the major philosophers from ancient times to the end of the Medieval period. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to analyze philosophical systems of thought from ancient times to the end of the Medieval period. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to synthesize philosophical perspectives in relation to their own lived experience in which they apply knowledge, skills, and virtue to their own lives. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to write philosophical essays, which reveal improved skill in the presentation and evaluation of arguments, where the students clearly and effectively present their own philosophical position. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students completing an assignment in History of Western Philosophy will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression.
  • Students will identify the major philosophers and the philosophical schools from ancient times to the beginning of the Renaissance period.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast philosophical systems of thought from ancient times to the beginning of the Renaissance period.
History of Western Philosophy PHIL 20B
  • Students will be able to analyze philosophical systems of thought from Renaissance to the contemporary period. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to synthesize philosophical perspectives in relation to their own lived experience, in which they apply knowledge, skills, and virtue to their own lives. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to write philosophical essays, which reveal improved skill in the presentation and evaluation of arguments, where the students clearly and effectively present their own philosophical position. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to analyze the major philosophers from the Renaissance to the contemporary period. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students completing an assignment in History of Western Philosophy course will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression.
  • Students will be able to identify the major philosophers and the philosophical schools from Renaissance to contemporary times.
  • Students will be to compare and contrast philosophical schools of thought from Renaissance to contemporary times.
History of Western Philosophy - Honors PHIL 20BH
  • Students will be able to analyze philosophical systems of thought from Renaissance to the contemporary period. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to synthesize philosophical perspectives in relation to their own lived experience, in which they apply knowledge, skills, and virtue to their own lives. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to write philosophical essays, which reveal improved skill in the presentation and evaluation of arguments, where the students clearly and effectively present their own philosophical position. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to analyze the major philosophers from the Renaissance to the contemporary period. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students completing an assignment in History of Western Philosophy Honors course will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression.
  • Students will be able to identify the major philosophers and the philosophical schools from Renaissance to contemporary times.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast philosophical systems of thought from Renaissance to contemporary times.
History of Western Philosophy - Honors PHIL 20AH
  • Students will be able to analyze philosophical systems of thought from ancient times to the end of the Medieval period. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to synthesize philosophical perspectives in relation to their own lived experience in which they apply knowledge, skills, and virtue to their own lives. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to write philosophical essays, which reveal improved skill in the presentation and evaluation of arguments, where the students clearly and effectively present their own philosophical position. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to analyze the major philosophers from ancient times to the end of the Medieval period. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students completing an assignment in History of Western Philosophy Honors will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students will identify the major philosopher and the philosophical schools from ancient times to the beginning of the Renaissance period.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast philosophical systems of thought from ancient times to the beginning of the Renaissance period.
Introduction to Criminology SOC 5
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will know major concepts of criminology.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
  • Students will be able to use criminological theories and research to analyze of the nature, extent, and causes of crime and delinquency.
  • Students will be able to apply a sociological understanding to assess how race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and age affect victimization patterns, arrest rates, charges, sentencing, and treatment of criminals.
Introduction to Criminology - Honors SOC 5H
  • Students will be able to apply a sociological understanding to assess how race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and age affect victimization patterns, arrest rates, charges, sentencing, and treatment of criminals.
  • Students will be able to use criminological theories and research to analyze of the nature, extent, and causes of crime and delinquency.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will know major concepts of criminology.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
Introduction to Gerontology SOC 4
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will know major concepts of gerontology.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
Introduction to LGBTQ Studies SOC 130
  • Students will explore the intersections of homophobia, transphobia, sexism, heterosexism, racism, classism, ageism, ableism, and other intersecting identities within the context of LGBTQ political struggles in the United States.
  • Students will analyze the various ways people identify their sexual orientation, their gender identity and expression, or both in the U.S. and abroad through an intersectional framework.
Introduction to Philosophy PHIL 5
  • Students will be able to apply philosophical knowledge to real world problems and contemporary issues. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to analyze the ideas of the major philosophers. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will learn to read, analyze and reflect on primary philosophical texts to formulate their own understanding. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to analyze the major philosophical schools of thought. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will identify knowledge of Ontological topics (Monism, Dualism, Pluralism).
  • Students completing an assignment in Introduction to Philosophy will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
Introduction to Philosophy - Honors PHIL 5H
  • Students will be able to apply philosophical knowledge to real world problems and contemporary issues. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to analyze the ideas of the major philosophers. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will learn to read, analyze and reflect on primary philosophical texts to formulate their own understanding. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to analyze the major philosophical schools of thought. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will attempt to identify knowledge of Empirical and Rational systems of knowledge.
  • Students completing an assignment in Introduction to Philosophy Honors will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression.
  • Students will attempt to identify knowledge of Ethical Systems (Deonlogical, Teleological, and Virtue Ethics).
  • Students will attempt to identify of Ontological topics (Monism, Dualism, and Pluralism)
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
Introduction to Sex and Gender Roles SOC 40
  • Students will identify diverse presentations, experiences, and constructions of gender in society with special attention to intersectionality.
  • Students will use sociological perspectives to analyze gender and its role within major social institutions.
Introduction to Social Justice SOC 110
  • Students will use a social justice framework to explore social inequality related to the intersections of diverse groups related to age, culture, class, ethnicity, disability, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, race, and religion.
  • Students will identify different social movements addressing social and economic justice.
Introduction to Statistics in Sociology and Social Sciences SOC 23
  • Students will identify and complete statistical analyses that are most appropriate for sociological and behavioral sciences and identify the strength of association between sociological variables.
  • Students will calculate and interpret elementary numerical computations and variability in statistical data.
Logic in Practice PHIL 3
  • Students will be able to distinguish and evaluate inductive and deductive arguments using criteria of evaluation such as valid/invalid, strong/weak, etc. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will learn to analyze informal fallacies. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be acquainted with the various forms of definitions and learn to construct proper definitions. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will learn to translate arguments into symbolic form to test their validity. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to apply deductive and inductive reasoning to morals, politics, science, literature, and everyday life scenarios. (9/2020)
  • Students will learn to distinguish arguments from non-arguments. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students completing an assignment in Logic will be able to develop a thesis statement that advances a clear argument.
Logic in Practice - Honors PHIL 3H
  • Students will be able to apply deductive and inductive reasoning to morals, politics, science, literature, and everyday life scenarios. (9/2020)
  • Students will learn to distinguish arguments from non-arguments. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to distinguish and evaluate inductive and deductive arguments using criteria of evaluation such as valid/invalid, strong/weak, etc. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will learn to analyze informal fallacies. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be acquainted with the various forms of definitions and learn to construct proper definitions. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will learn to translate arguments into symbolic form to test their validity. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students completing an assignment in Logic Honors will be able to develop a thesis statement that advances a clear argument.
  • Students will identify knowledge of Classifying Arguments (Inductive/Deductive).
  • Students identify knowledge of Evaluating Arguments (Strong/Weak, Cogent/Uncogent; Valid/Invalid, Sound/Unsound)
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
Major World Religions PHIL 15
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast a variety of religious themes. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to analyze primary religious text. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will understand the impact of religion in the world at large. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to identify the practice, belief and history of the major world religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Jainism, Taoism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students completing an assignment in Major World Religions will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their world religion coursework.
Major World Religions - Honors PHIL 15H
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast a variety of religious themes. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to analyze primary religious text. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will understand the impact of religion in the world at large. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Major World Religions Students will be able to identify the practice, belief and history of the major world religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Jainism, Taoism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students completing an assignment in Major World Religions Honors will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
Marriage and the Family SOC 14
  • Students will use sociological concepts to identify the intersection of race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups as well as the impact on the socialization and interaction within the changing family.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will know major concepts of marriage and family.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
Marriage and the Family - Honors SOC 14H
  • Students will use sociological concepts to identify the intersection of race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups as well as the impact on the socialization and interaction within the changing family.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will know major concepts of marriage and family.
Sociology SOC 2
  • Students will be able to understand and demonstrate the analysis of how controversial public issues arise in contemporary American society and the interplay between race, class, gender, sexuality and other social groups.
  • Students will be able to identify and analyze how sociological principles and concepts are applied in the understanding of social problems.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
Sociology SOC 1
  • Students will identify and apply the main sociological theoretical frameworks to analyze social stratification based on race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups.
  • Students will apply sociological research to distinguish the interrelatedness of various social intuitions and the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will identify the role of culture and socialization in the development of one’s beliefs, opinions, and values.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will know major concepts of sociology.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
Sociology - Honors SOC 2H
  • Students will be able to identify and analyze how sociological principles and concepts are applied in the understanding of social problems.
  • Students will be able to understand and demonstrate the analysis of how controversial public issues arise in contemporary American society and the interplay between race, class, gender, sexuality and other social groups.
  • Students will demonstrate an thorough understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will thoroughly analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior
  • Students will know major concepts of social problems.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
Sociology - Honors SOC 1H
  • Students will identify and apply the main sociological theoretical frameworks to analyze social stratification based on race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups.
  • Students will apply sociological research to distinguish the interrelatedness of various social intuitions and the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will thoroughly know the major concepts of General Sociology.
  • Students will demonstrate an thorough understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will thoroughly analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students will identify the role of culture and socialization in the development of one’s beliefs, opinions, and values.
Sociology of Religion SOC 7
  • Students will know the major concepts of religion.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
Special Projects in Philosophy PHIL 99
  • Students will develop conceptual competence, demonstrate vigor of logical inquiry, and produce clarity of expression.
Special Projects in Sociology SOC 99
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.