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Discipline

  • Results for SLO Disciplines>

Student Learning Outcomes

Discipline: Degree: AS - Integrated Pest Management - S0311
Course Name Course Number Objectives
Biology Basic Skills BIOL 50
  • Bio 50 students will be able to apply 3 different memorization techniques to their specific course content.
  • Demonstrate good time management skill
  • Distinguish the differences in demands of science vs. non-science courses.
  • Practice effective preparation for biological laboratory as well as lecture sessions.
  • Develop personal study plans for biology courses.
  • Interpret information from a graph.
  • Utilize appropriate test-taking strategies to pass biological science exams and laboratory practicums.
Biology for Majors BIOL 4
  • Students completing this project will be able to demonstrate the ability to show the relevance of biology on their daily lives.
  • Students will have the ability to form a hypothesis, collect data, conduct statistical analysis, and interpret data.
  • Students will be able to examine the chemical organization and structure of cells, and relate these to cellular processes including transport, synthesis and cell reproduction.
  • Students will be able to apply principles of the scientific method in experimental situations and demonstrate explain the purpose and expected outcomes of laboratory experiments.
  • Students will be able to evaluate experimental results in the laboratory and explain why these may differ from expected results.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the components of the organizational hierarchy within the biosphere.
  • Students will be able to describe the structure of DNA, its mechanism of replication and the implications of this process on inheritance, evolution and biodiversity.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration, and explain the significance of the similarities and differences between the two processes.
  • Students will be able to integrate the principles of ecology to explain relationships within the biosphere and human impact on the planet.
Biology for Majors - Honors BIOL 4H
  • Students completing this project will be able to demonstrate the ability to show the relevance of biology on their daily lives.
  • Students will have the ability to form a hypothesis, collect data, conduct statistical analysis, and interpret data.
  • Students will be able to apply principles of the scientific method in experimental situations and demonstrate explain the purpose and expected outcomes of laboratory experiments.
  • Students will be able to evaluate experimental results in the laboratory and explain why these may differ from expected results.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the components of the organizational hierarchy within the biosphere.
  • Students will be able to describe the structure of DNA, its mechanism of replication and the implications of this process on inheritance, evolution and biodiversity.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration, and explain the significance of the similarities and differences between the two processes.
  • Students will be able to integrate the principles of ecology to explain relationships within the biosphere and human impact on the planet.
  • Students will be able to examine the chemical organization and structure of cells, and relate these to cellular processes including transport, synthesis and cell reproduction.
Cell and Molecular Biology BIOL 8
  • Students will be able to identify the function of each component of the SDS PAGE development process (primary antibody, secondary antibody, biotin, milk protein).
  • Students will be able to accurately draw a plasmid map based on the results of a restriction digest of a plasmid.
Chemistry for Allied Health Majors CHEM 10
  • Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical bonding concepts such as writing the electron-dot (Lewis) structure, predicting molecular geometry, and determining whether a given bond is ionic, nonpolar covalent or polar-covalent.
  • Students enrolling in CHEM 10 are able to perform appropriate algebra skills.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of acid-base concepts such as predicting products of neutralization reaction, comparing relative acidity of solutions based on pH, and calculating the concentrations of hydronium ions, hydroxide ions, and pH of acidic and basic solutions.
  • Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical bonding concepts such as writing the electron-dot (Lewis) structure, predicting molecular geometry, and determining whether a given bond is ionic, nonpolar covalent or polar-covalent.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives. This GEO assessment was based on the topic of Reaction Rates
  • Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of acid-base concepts such as predicting products of neutralization reaction, comparing relative acidity of solutions based on pH, and calculating the concentrations of hydronium ions, hydroxide ions, and pH of acidic and basic solutions.
  • Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical bonding concepts such as writing the electron-dot (Lewis) structure, predicting molecular geometry, and determining whether a given bond is ionic, nonpolar covalent or polar-covalent.
  • Chem 10 student will be successful at defining a chemical reaction and identifying the observations that indicate a chemical reaction.
  • 1) Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of acid-base concepts such as comparing relative acidity of solutions based on pH 2) Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of acid-base concepts such as calculating the concentrations of hydronium ions, hydroxide ions, and pH of acidic and basic solutions
  • Express measurements using correct significant figures. Perform calculations, set up and solve problems using conversion factors.
  • Analyze the structure of an atom, and write electron configurations for elements in the Periodic Table.
  • Differentiate types of radioactivity, contrast methods of medical applications, write nuclear equations and solve problems relating to half-lives of radioactive substances.
  • Identify the types of bonds, predict bond polarity, and write the names or formulas for inorganic compounds.
  • Compare and contrast the three states of matter and forms of energy. Evaluate energy profiles of chemical reactions and calculate the energy for changes of state.
  • Complete and balance various types of chemical equations including oxidation-reduction reactions. Apply the concept of mole to solve for quantities in chemical reactions.
  • Apply the concepts of reversible reactions to explain chemical equilibrium.
  • Apply gas laws to describe the behavior of gases. Set up and solve gas law problems.
  • Solve various solution problems including solubility, concentration, and dilution. Compare solution properties such as osmosis, dialysis, electrolytes, and non-electrolytes.
  • Identify common characteristics of acids and bases including names, strengths, reactions, ionization in aqueous solution, pH scale, and buffers. Calculate the pH of solutions and evaluate the effects of adding an acid/base to a buffer system.
  • Compare and contrast the structure and properties, apply the IUPAC naming system, identify functional groups, and draw structural formulas for organic compounds.
  • Demonstrate proper and safe laboratory techniques, record observations, collect and analyze data, and form conclusion by performing both qualitative and quantitative experiments that support lecture topics.
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  • Perform calculations, set up and solve problems using conversion factors.
Ecology and Field Biology BIOL 3
  • Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to show the relevance of biology on their daily lives.
  • Students will be able to explain the concept of natural selection through ecological examples of comparative adaptations.
  • Students will be able to integrate principles of ecology to explain relationships within the biosphere and man's impact on the planet.
  • Students will be able to use dichotomous keys in identification of plant and animal species.
  • Students will be able to examine current ecological applications (i.e. sharing of neighborhoods by people and predatory species, effectiveness of the endangered species act, fragmentation of wildlife habitat, etc.).
  • Students will be able to diagram biogeochemical cycles and their relationship to environmental problems such as acid rain and global warming.
  • Students will be able to apply scientific theories and concerns (e.g. human population growth).
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast environmental topics such as ozone depletion vs. global warming, various animal mating systems, various foraging strategies, etc.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate various field techniques such as insect collection/ mounting, plant pressing, vegetation line transects, etc.
  • Students will be able to identify various local habitat types and their associated organisms, including amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals and plants.
Fundamentals of Genetics BIOL 34
  • Students will be able to determine the mode of inheritance of a human genetic disorder from examining a pedigree of inheritance of that disorder.
  • Students will be able to solve genetics problems including those involving dominance, incomplete dominance, multiple genes, sex linkage, and epistasis.
  • Students will be able to solve genetics problems involving linkage and recombination.
  • Students will be able to describe the components of the eukaryotic genome.
  • Students will be able to relate the structures of DNA to DNA replication.
  • Students will be able to explain the process of RNA and protein synthesis and how these processes are regulated.
  • Students will be able to describe the role of gene expression in development using specific genes as examples.
  • Students will be able to describe types of mutations at the molecular level.
  • Students will be able to describe types of mutations at the chromosomal level including aneuploidies, deletions, duplications, inversions and translocations.
  • Students will be able to discuss the relationship between mutation and molecular evolution and evolution in organisms.
  • Students will be able to describe the methods and applications of recombinant DNA technology.
  • Students will be able to identify and discuss the ethical and moral implications of genetic technology including recombinant DNA technology.
  • students will be able to provide the correct map distance between genes with data from a three point cross.
General Biology - GE BIOL 1
  • Students will be able to analyze data and construct a graph of their results in a scientifically appropriate manner.
  • Students' developmental learning will be addressed through tailored instruction using clicker technology such that students who are taught in courses using clicker technology will have a greater ability to solve metric problems.
  • Students' developmental learning will be addressed through tailored instruction using clicker technology such that students who are taught in courses using clicker technology will have greater abilities to understand new terminology through recognizing the meanings of prefixes, suffixes and word roots.
  • An advisory prereq of READ 100 has been added to Bio 1 course outline. It is currently in the queue for review by Ed Design.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Classify the molecules of living systems and apply basic principles of chemistry to their interaction.
  • Relate cell structure and physiology.
  • Compare and contrast the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in terms of energy transformation in cells.
  • Evaluate how life forms duplicate, maintain control, and exhibit hereditary patterns.
  • Summarize the various types of evidence used to examine evolutionary principles.
  • Assess how population and community dynamics are affected by ecological interactions.
  • Describe how the systems of the human body interact to maintain homeostasis.
  • Explain why evolution is the most all-encompassing scientific explanation for the history of life and the similarities in biochemistry and physiological processes among living things.
  • Can students answer general questions about community and population ecology and natural selection after completing a related activity in lab?
General Chemistry I CHEM 50
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of solution chemistry such as calculating molarity, making dilutions, and performing stoichiometric calculations.
  • Chem. 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of oxidation-reduction (redox) chemistry such as calculating oxidation numbers, identifying a redox reaction, finding oxidizing and reducing agents, and recognizing oxidation and reduction half-reactions of a redox reaction.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of oxidation-reduction concepts, such as: a. Determining oxidation numbers b. Identifying redox reactions c. Determining the oxidizing and reducing agents in a chemical reaction d. Classifying half-reactions as oxidation or reduction
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of solution chemistry such as: a. calculating molarity b. making dilutions c. performing stoichiometric calculations.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives. This assessment deals with dilutions.
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of solution chemistry such as: a. calculating molarity b. making dilutions c. performing stoichiometric calculations.
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of stoichiometric principles, such as: a. Mole-to-mole conversions b. Mole-to-mass conversions c. Mass-to-mass conversions d. Identifying limiting reactant e. Calculating the theoretical yield f. Calculating the amount of excess reactant
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of oxidation-reduction concepts, such as: a. Determining oxidation numbers b. Identifying redox reactions c. Determining the oxidizing and reducing agents in a chemical reaction d. Classifying half-reactions as oxidation or reduction
General Chemistry I - Honors CHEM 50H
  • Chem 50H students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of solution chemistry such as calculating molarity, making dilutions, and performing stoichiometric calculations.
  • Chem 50H students will be able to; a. predict a compound?s water solubility, b. predict a compound?s water reaction and electrolyte classification, c. predict single and double replacement reaction products including, neutralization, gas formation and, d. identify the net ionic equation for a reaction
  • Chem 50H students will be able to record measurements from common laboratory devices to the proper precision of each device.
  • Chemistry experiment and laboratory report: Determine the enthalpy of 2 different chemical reactions by preparing, experimenting, calculating, and reporting chemical results properly, using critical thinking in offering suggestions on how to improve results in further experimentation.
  • Chem 50H students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of stoichiometric principles, such as: a. Mole-to-mole conversions b. Mole-to-mass conversions c. Mass-to-mass conversions d. Identifying limiting reactant e. Calculating the theoretical yield f. Calculating the amount of excess reactant
General Chemistry II CHEM 51
  • Chem 51 students will be able to; a. Examine and predict the common ion effect on an equilibrium b. Recognize buffer a solution c. Determine pH of a buffer solutions d. Determine pH of a buffer solution upon addition of a strong acid or base. e. Determine chemical quantities needed in order to prepare a buffer solution.
  • Chem 51 students will be able to determine the order, rate law, and rate constant of a chemical equation based on a. Initial rates vs concentration data and b. Graphical analysis of concentration vs time data
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Chem 51 students will be able to a. determine the equilibrium constant expression (Law of Mass Action) when given a balanced chemical equation b. relate the magnitude of the equilibrium constant to the general position of the equilibrium c. determine the value of the equilibrium constant when given concentrations of reactants and/or products and the equilibrium expression d. apply stoichiometric principles to determine concentrations of reactants and/or products (simple algebraic or quadratic equation method) when given initial conditions, the value of the equilibrium constant, and the equilibrium expression e. apply Le Chatelier's Principle to an equilibrium system to predict the shift in equilibrium position when reaction conditions of concentration, temperature, or volume are changed
  • Chem 51 students will be able to a. examine and predict the effect of common ions on an aqueous equilibrium system b. recognize a buffer solution c. determine pH of a buffer solution d. determine pH of a buffer solution upon addition of a strong acid or base e. determine Kb from a corresponding Ka or vice versa f. determine chemical quantities needed in order to prepare a buffer solution of given pH and acid or base concentration
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives. The Chem 51 GEO assessment question for Fall 2012 dealt with solubility equilibria and Le Chatelier?s Principle
  • SLO on Common Ion Effect and Solubility Product Constant (Ksp) focused on the following measureable objectives: 2. Write equilibrium expression for reversible chemical systems. Calculate the equilibrium position, value of the equilibrium constant, and concentrations of all components of the system. 3. Apply Le Chatelier's Principle to systems at equilibrium to predict responses to stresses on the systems. The questions focused on determination of solubility, understanding the concept of Ksp, and the effects of the common ion effect on solubility. Some of the questions related directly to experiences that they had in several lab experiments.
  • By using the concept of Le Chatelier’s Principle, students will be able to a. predict the effect that causes the reaction to shift toward products in a gas phase reaction initially at equilibrium. b. predict the correct effect of different stresses on a gas phase reaction at equilibrium c. predict the correct effect of adding a substance that reacts with a component in the equilibrium system of a slightly soluble salt that was used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment d. predict the correct effect (by color of solution) from adding common ion in the aqueous phase equilibrium system used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment e. predict the correct effect (by color of solution) from adding a substance that reacts with a component in the equilibrium system used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment. The questions focused on determining the direction of shift of a reaction upon adding a variety of stresses to a system at equilibrium. Some of the questions related directly to experiences that they had in several lab experiments
  • By using the concept of Le Chatelier’s Principle, students will be able to a. predict the effect that causes the reaction to shift toward products in a gas phase reaction initially at equilibrium. b. predict the correct effect of different stresses on a gas phase reaction at equilibrium c. predict the correct effect of adding a substance that reacts with a component in the equilibrium system of a slightly soluble salt that was used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment d. predict the correct effect (by color of solution) from adding common ion in the aqueous phase equilibrium system used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment e. predict the correct effect (by color of solution) from adding a substance that reacts with a component in the equilibrium system used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment. The questions focused on determining the direction of shift of a reaction upon adding a variety of stresses to a system at equilibrium. Some of the questions related directly to experiences that they had in several lab experiments.
  • Chem 51 students will be able to a. examine and predict the effect of common ions on an aqueous equilibrium system b. examine and predict the effect of common ions on an aqueous equilibrium system as applied to the Solubility Procudt Constant (Ksp) Experiment c. predicting degree of solubility based on solubility product constants d. calculating the value of the solubility of a solution containing a common ion The questions focused on determination of solubility, understanding the concept of Ksp, and the effects of the common ion effect on solubility. Some of the questions related directly to experiences that they had in several lab experiments.
  • Chem 51 students will be able to a. Define and identify a buffer solution b. Determine the pH of a buffer solution c. Predict the change in pH of a buffer solution upon addition of a strong acid or base d. Determine the chemical quantitates needed in order to prepare a buffer solution of given pH and acid or base concentration
  • Student will be able to understand kinetics
Horticultural Science AGOR 1 (VOC)
  • Students completing AGOR 1 will be able to explain concepts related to plant structure and function.
  • Students completing AGOR 1 will be able to describe climatic and microclimate interactions and how they influence plant growth.
  • Students completing AGOR 1 will be able to explain how different types of soils can be managed to improve plant growth
  • Students completing AGOR 1 will be able to correctly identify the nutrients required to correct nutrient deficiencies in plants.
  • GEO- Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives.
Humans and the Environment BIOL 6
  • Students will develop intelligent activism in efforts to save the environment from deterioration.
  • Students will learn ecological principles, differentiate which ecological principles relate to specific ecological situations inspected in class and/or determine the relevance of environmental science to their daily lives
  • Appraise the complexities of the biological and environmental problems confronting humans.
  • Integrate ecological principles into everyday thought and apply them to decision- making.
  • Illustrate the basic ecological concept that everything living and non-living is interconnected.
  • Examine the differences between a frontier society and a sustainable earth society.
  • Contrast the laws of matter and thermodynamics and assess their connections to pollution.
  • Evaluate the concept of carrying capacity as it relates to the earth's resources and matter recycling systems.
  • Evaluate the "J"-shaped curves of increasing population, natural resource use and pollution with respect to their ability to disrupt the earth's life support system.
  • Evaluate the task of moving from simplistic, linear thinking to circular, cybernetic thinking that is harmonious with the ecological cycles that sustain us.
Humans and the Environment Laboratory BIOL 6L
  • Students will summarize and evaluate in writing critical ecological concerns regarding Mt. San Antonio College?s Wildlife Sanctuary
  • Students will learn ecological principles, differentiate which ecological principles relate to specific ecological situations inspected in lab and determine the relevance of environmental science to their daily lives
  • Select appropriate ecological principles from the textbook and integrate these principles in preparing written field notebooks.
  • Analyze the ecological principles presented in a variety of environmental articles.
  • Assess the potential problems of abused ecosystems and describe these problems.
  • Summarize the characteristics of California native plant communities.
  • Examine the process of energy production from waste resources.
  • Illustrate a flow chart of an urban water reclamation plant.
  • Analyze and evaluate the pros and cons of resource recycling.
  • Examine and evaluate the biological and social values of the Mt. San Antonio College Wildlife Sanctuary and other ecological reserves.
  • Summarize and evaluate critical ecological concerns along the Southern California coast.
  • Analyze information and describe the effects of nuclear weapons on the abiotic and biotic environment.
Integrated Pest Management AGOR 24 (VOC)
  • Course completers will be able to formulate and implement a complete Integrated Pest Management program for a specific site.
  • Students completing AGOR 24 will be able to give a professional quality oral presentation
  • Successful completers will be able to identify local pests and disorders of trees, turf, and ornamental landscapes.
  • Students successfully completing this course will be able to demonstrate knowledge of Laws and Regulations of California Department of Pesticide Regulation
Interior Landscaping AGOR 15 (VOC)
  • Course completers will be able to recognize and explain the benefits of plants in the interior.
  • Course completers will be able to identify and explain appropriate irrigation practices for interior applications.
  • Course completers will be able to interact with clients in a professional manner.
  • Students completing AGOR 15 will be able to give a professional quality oral presentation.
Introduction to General Chemistry CHEM 40
  • Chemistry 40 students will be able to interpret information and determine the sub-atomic particles and structure of atoms, isotopes and ions.
  • Chemistry 40 students will be able to apply the principles of stoichiometry to calculate the quantities of any component in a balanced chemical reaction equation.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • CHEM 40 students will be able to assign a molecular geometry of linear, bent, trigonal planar, trigonal pyramidal, or tetrahedral to a given molecule.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives. This assessment involved using household chemicals to identify counterfeit currency.
  • Chemistry 40 students will be able to apply the principles of stoichiometry to calculate the quantities of any component in a balanced chemical reaction equation.
  • Chemistry 40 students will be able to interpret information and determine the sub-atomic particles and structure of atoms, isotopes and ions.
  • Chemistry 40 students will be able to apply the principles of stoichiometry to calculate the quantities of any component in a balanced chemical reaction equation.
  • Students will be able to calculate the percent composition, molar masses, empirical and molecular formula of compounds from appropriate data.
  • This GEO assessment was based on the topic of the Household Chemicals experiment and the following questions were selected: In the Household Chemicals experiment, you observed one of the reactions between iodine and starch. The counterfeit banknote detection pen is a device used to by businesses to detect fake bills. The pen uses iodine-based ink to detect authenticity. Keep in mind that all US dollar bills are printed on paper made out of cotton fibers which do not contain starch while counterfeit bills are usually printed on paper containing some starch. In your own words (in five sentences or less) describe what would happen when ink from a counterfeit banknote detection pen writes on real United States bills versus a counterfeit bill. Please describe what kind of observation you would expect to witness. Would you be able to detect a counterfeit banknote?
Introductory Organic and Biochemistry CHEM 20
  • Classify organic molecules based on functional groups Differentiate constitutional isomers from cis-trans isomers (stereoisomers) Relate the physical properties of organic molecules to their structure Propose and name the products of organic chemical reactions
  • Classify biomolecules as lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, or nucleic acids. Identify the function of biomolecules in living systems. Identify the locations, steps, and products involved in metabolic pathways. Identify the locations, steps, and products involved in gene expression.
  • Classify organic molecules based on functional groups Differentiate constitutional isomers from cis-trans isomers (stereoisomers) Relate the physical properties of organic molecules to their structure Propose and name the products of organic chemical reactions
  • Classify biomolecules as lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, or nucleic acids. Identify the function of biomolecules in living systems. Identify the locations, steps, and products involved in metabolic pathways. Identify the locations, steps, and products involved in gene expression.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives. The topic of this assessment is the application of intermolecular attractions to biological systems.
  • Students will be able to: Describe the fate of proteins that enter the body. Describe what happens to the excess amino acids in the body? Describe the ultimate fate of the nitrogen atoms from excess amino acids? Describe TWO different possible fates of the carbon skeletons from excess amino acids.
  • Given a segment of DNA, students will be able to: 1. Identify which strand is used for transcription and draw the primary structure of the mRNA produced in the transcription underneath the strand. 2. Write the sequence of polypeptide that will be produced from the DNA. 3. Clearly describe the effect on the protein chain when a base pair is mutated.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
Landscape Irrigation - Design and Installation AGOR 62 (VOC)
  • Course completers will be able to evaluate a site and develop a functional design that meets client criteria
  • Identify the proper components of a efficient automatic irrigation system
Landscape Irrigation Systems Management AGOR 63 (VOC)
  • Students will be able to determine the distribution uniformity of an irrigation system.
  • Completers will be able to properly repair a PVC piping system used in Irrigation.
Landscaping and Nursery Management AGOR 32 (VOC)
  • Students completing this course will be able to explain the organizational structure of the nursery industry.
  • Students completing AGOR 32 will be able to demonstrate good customer relations skills.
  • Demonstrate a work ethic appropriate to the plant production industry.
Marine Biology BIOL 20
  • Students will be able to distinguish organisms that belong to class Chondrichthyes (fishes with a cartilaginous skeleton) form organisms that belong to class Osteichthyes (fishes with a bony skeleton).
  • Students will be able to describe two major differences between vertebrate and invertebrate marine organisms.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily live
  • Students will be able to differentiate between the major phyla of marine organisms.
  • Students will be able to explain factors that influence winds, currents and tides.
  • Students will be able to identify dominant invertebrates and vertebrates associated with the southern California coast.
  • Students will be able to summarize ecological principles associated with marine ecosystems.
  • Students will be able to explain the process of plate tectonics and its significance in marine environments.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the biological and political factors that are associated with overfishing.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the geological, physical, and chemical aspects of the marine environment and explain how marine organisms adapt to each aspect.
  • Students will be able to analyze the limiting factors of oceanic provinces.
Marine Biology - Laboratory BIOL 21
  • Students will demonstrate an ability to recognize chordgrass, pickleweed, and salt grass and describe the elevational distribution of these plants in a salt marsh.
  • Students will be able to identify 5 different organisms found in the intertidal zone of southern California.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Students will be able to differentiate between the major phyla of marine organisms based on anatomical differences discovered in laboratory dissections.
  • Students will be able to identify dominant invertebrates and vertebrates of the intertidal regions in a field situation by observing differences in distribution at different elevations above sea level.
  • Students will be able to summarize ecological principles associated with marine ecosystems.
  • Students will be able to analyze external and internal anatomy of marine organisms and describe differences in structure between various classes of marine organisms within a particular phylum.
  • Students will be able to relate anatomical structure to life style of various marine organisms, and analyze the significance of the structure and functions of organ systems to the mode of life in the marine environment.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the biological and physical aspects of the marine environment, and explain adaptations of marine organisms to each aspect.
Organic Chemistry CHEM 80
  • Chemistry 80 students should be able to analyze 3-D, Fisher, and Newman projection formulae to determine their structural relationships and relative energies.
  • Chemistry 80 students will be able to predict products and discuss reaction mechanisms of nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions and be able to draw all associated intermediate and transition intermediates.
  • Chem 80 students will be able to analyze 3D, Fischer and Newman projection formula to determine their structural relationships and relative energies.
  • Chem 80 students will be able to predict products and analyze reaction mechanisms of nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions and be able to draw all associated intermediate and transition states.
  • Provided with a molecular formula and the infrared (IR), 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR spectra for an unknown organic molecule, CHEM 80 students will be able to propose a correct structure for the molecule. The assessment consisted of questions in a multiple-choice standardized-exam format (ACS Standardized National Exam), focusing on IR and NMR. In addition, a student survey was administered to gauge the effectiveness of replacing the old computers with new ones in the CTC Lab. Some of the questions targeted direct experience using the CTC lab.
  • CHEM 80 students will be able to demonstrate the effectiveness of the CTC Lab. These updated tools promote their success in organic chemistry.
Organic Chemistry CHEM 81
  • Provided with a molecular formula and the infrared (IR), 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR spectra for an unknown organic molecule, CHEM 81 students will be able to propose a correct structure for the unknown molecule.
  • students will be able to evaluate a multistep synthesis An exit exam where students will analyze the reaction intermediates and reagents necessary to accomplish the multistep synthesis of a given target molecule.
  • Students will use spectral data, such as IR, HNMR, CNMR, DEPT and MS, to determine the structure of a simple organic molecule or product of a reaction.
  • Students will predict the major product of a single-step organic reaction.
  • Provide wit a molecular formula and the infrared(IR), 1H-­-NMR,13C-­-NMR spectra for an unknown organic molecule, CHEM 81 students will be able to propose a correct structure for the unknown molecule.
  • Provided with a molecular formula and the infrared (IR), 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR spectra for an unknown organic molecule, CHEM 81 students will be able to propose a correct structure for the unknown molecule.
  • SLO 2 (Evaluation of a Multi-Step Synthesis) - CHEM 81 students will be able to evaluate a mechanism of a multi-step synthesis reaction.
Ornamental Plants - Herbaceous AGOR 29 (VOC)
  • Course completers will be able to explain the binomial method of plant nomenclature.
  • Course completers will be able to identify common herbaceous landscape plants
Ornamental Plants - Trees and Woody Shrubs AGOR 30 (VOC)
  • Course completers will be able to explain the binomial method of plant nomenclature.
  • Course completers will be able to identify common landscape trees and woody shrubs
Plant and Animal Biology BIOL 2
  • Students will be able to construct cladogram. Students will be able to correctly analyze and construct a cladogram using shared and derived characteristics placing species and their characteristics in the proper positions.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives (area B GEO being used as course level SLO)
  • Students will be able to discuss evolutionary changes throughout the geological time scale including topics on systematics, taxonomy, and biological diversity.
  • Students will be able to analyze the current taxonomic classification schemes and discuss how taxonomy is a work in progress.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and describe how they are arranged in a classification hierarchy.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the different taxonomic groups (bacteria, protists, plants, animals and fungi) and discuss evolutionary changes that led to their adaptive radiation throughout geological time.
  • Students will be able to define the concept of alteration of generation, and analyze the modifications that have occurred in different organismal groups.
  • Students will be able to describe the life cycles of the important phyla in detail emphasizing evolutionary trends through geological time.
  • Students will be able to describe plant form and function emphasizing evolutionary trends throughout the plant kingdom (including structure, function, growth, transport, nutrition, control systems, reproduction and development.)
  • Students will be able to describe animal form and function emphasizing evolutionary trends throughout the animal kingdom (including structure, function, nutrition, circulation, gas exchange, immune response, internal controls, chemical signals, reproduction, development, behavior, nervous and sensory systems).
  • Students will be able to complete an analysis of plant and animal interactions in relationship to their biomes.
  • Students will be able to classify plants to Family. Students will be able to correctly analyze plant characteristics and be able to place unfamiliar plants into their correct plant families.
Plant Propagation/Greenhouse Management AGOR 2 (VOC)
  • Course completers will be able to formulate growing media that is appropriate for use in propagation of plants.
  • Course completers will be able to integrate proper sanitation and disease prevention procedures
  • Course completers will be able to demonstrate commercial plant propagation techniques used in the nursery industry.
  • Students completing AGOR 2 will be able to demonstrate a work ethic appropriate to the plant production industry.
Plant Structures, Functions, and Diversity BTNY 3
  • Students will use the Scientific Method for a plant growth project to develop an understanding for how science works.
  • Students will learn a variety of values of botanical organisms inspected in during class and determine the relevance of Botany to their daily lives
  • Identify cells and tissues in stems, leaves and roots.
  • Compare and contrast the anatomical and morphological differences between stems, leaves and roots.
  • Distinguish modifications of stems, leaves and roots with respect to various environmental conditions related to water and food.
  • Evaluate various theories dealing with uptake of water and food and associated transport pathways in vascular plants.
  • Examine, monitor and analyze the growth and development of plants from seed to seed and relate deficiencies in nutrients to growth changes.
  • Summarize the characteristics of plant communities and biomes.
  • Examine the major lines of evolution of plants and the phylogenetic relationships from bacteria to angiosperms, including the work of Charles Darwin and natural selection.
  • Illustrate the ecological concept that every living and non-living thing is interconnected, with emphasis on biotic as well as abiotic factors such as soil and exposure to sun/wind.
  • Compare and contrast the reproductive structures of bacteria, algae, fungi, bryophytes, lower vascular plants, ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms.
  • Discuss the importance of biodiversity and conservation.
  • Value plants, fungi, algae, and the natural world.
Soil Science and Management AGOR 50 (VOC)
  • Course completers will be able to evaluate the soil conditions at an existing site and make specific recommendations for the immediate and long-term correction of all problems
  • Course completers will be able to predict the potential effects that certain chemical and physical properties of soils will have on overall plant health.
  • Course completers will be able to identify and explain all aspects of a standard soil test.
Sports Turf Management AGOR 40 (VOC)
  • Students completing AGOR 40 will be able to give a professional quality oral presentation.
  • Course completers will be able to assess the use of artificial surfaces for sports areas and present an argument in favor of, or in opposition to, the use of artificial surfaces.
  • Course completers will be able to formulate and propose an all-inclusive management program for a sports turf area
  • Course completers will be able to formulate and propose an all-inclusive management program for a sports turf area
Turf Management AGOR 39 (VOC)
  • Course completers will be able to identify common turf species and describe their uses
  • Students completing AGOR 39 will be able to give a professional quality oral presentation.
  • Course completers will be able to formulate and implement a complete Turf Management program for a specific site.
Urban Arboriculture AGOR 75 (VOC)
  • Students completing this course will be able to demonstrate proper pruning skills for pruning woody trees and shrubs.
  • Students will be able to explain the nutritional needs of trees.
  • Course completers will be able to describe proper safety techniques for use in arboriculture practices.
  • Course completers will be able to demonstrate proper use of Personal Protective Equipment.
Work Experience in Nursery Operations AGOR 91
  • Employers of HorticultureWork Experience Students will rate the technical skills of their students as above average.
  • Employers of Horticulture Work Experience Students will rate the work habits of their students as above average.