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Discipline

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Student Learning Outcomes

Discipline: Degree: AA - Liberal Arts Emphasis Social and Behavioral Sciences - A8991
Course Name Course Number Objectives
Abnormal Psychology PSYC 19
  • Identify and analyze major psychological disorders using signs and symptoms from the current DSM.
  • Identify and apply theoretical perspectives used to describe the causes of mental disorders.
  • Explain the criteria for defining abnormal behavior.
  • Compare and contrast the major theoretical perspectives in abnormal psychology.
  • Explain the history, structure, use and limitations of the DSM 5.
  • Compare various research methods that are used to study abnormal behavior.
  • Identify symptoms of disorders, incl. adjustment, anxiety, mood, somatoform, psychotic, personality, dissociation, eating, sleeping, gender, sexual, & substance-related.
  • Evaluate legal definitions of insanity and incompetence.
  • Analyze ethical issues in treatment of disorders.
  • Apply diagnostic criteria to suggest possible diagnoses and treatment for disorders to case studies.
  • Explain sociocultural issues in diagnosis and treatment.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social institutions and human behavior.
African American Politics POLI 35
  • Students will be able to identify significant changes that have occurred in African-American political participation since the passage of the Voting Rights Act.
  • Students will be able to assess the success of African Americans in attaining representation in various levels of government.
  • Students will be able to differentiate among changes in the American constitutional government over time.
Biological Anthropology ANTH 1
  • Students will be able to name one hominin species, describe it, provide an approximate date, and explain why the species can be considered transitional
  • Students will be able to identify the origins of evolutionary thought and the major historical figures in the field.
  • Students will be able to contrast and compare scientific and creationist views of evolution.
  • Students will be able to define and illustrate the mechanisms of evolution (such as those responsible for genetic diseases) including mutation, natural selection, gene flow, genetic drift, and non-random mating.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the various genetic theories of human behavior and modern variation.
  • Students will be able to identify living and fossil nonhuman primates in terms of skeletal attributes and observed or inferred behaviors.
  • Students will be able to compare behaviors among primate species, including claims of language and other cultural attributes.
  • Students will be able to describe the basic methods of paleoanthropology and explain the various dating techniques.
  • Students will be able to identify and differentiate among hominid fossils including the robust and other australopithecines; early genus Homo; Homo erectus; Neanderthals and other archaics; and modern Homo sapiens.
  • Students will be able to evaluate various approaches to the classification of nonhuman and hominid primates such as cladistics vs. traditional systematics and issues about lumping vs. splitting species.
  • Students will be able to evaluate theories relating to the origins of bipedalism, tool use, language, modern Homo sapiens, art and symbolism.
  • Students will be able to locate other primates [i.e., other than Homo sapiens] on a world map.
Biological Anthropology - Honors ANTH 1H
  • Students will be able to describe at least 5 physical and behavioral differences between monkeys and apes
  • Students will be able to identify the origins of evolutionary thought and the major historical figures in the field.
  • Students will be able to contrast and compare scientific and creationist views of evolution.
  • Students will be able to define and illustrate the mechanisms of evolution (such as those responsible for genetic diseases) including mutation, natural selection, gene flow, genetic drift, and non-random mating.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the various genetic theories of human behavior and modern variation.
  • Students will be able to identify living and fossil nonhuman primates in terms of skeletal attributes and observed or inferred behaviors.
  • Students will be able to compare behaviors among primate species, including claims of language and other cultural attributes.
  • Students will be able to describe the basic methods of paleoanthropology and explain the various dating techniques.
  • Students will be able to identify and differentiate among hominid fossils including the robust and other australopithecines; early genus Homo; Homo erectus; Neanderthals and other archaics; and modern Homo sapiens.
  • Students will be able to evaluate various approaches to the classification of nonhuman and hominid primates such as cladistics vs. traditional systematics and issues about lumping vs. splitting species.
  • Students will be able to evaluate theories relating to the origins of bipedalism, tool use, language, modern Homo sapiens, art and symbolism.
Biological Psychology PSYC 1B
  • Identify the major anatomical structures, and their functions, of the nervous system.
  • Identify the major structures and main sequence of events of neural chemical transmission.
  • Students will apply biopsychological principles/ findings to their own lives.
  • Identify the major structures of the brain from coronal, mid sagittal, and horizontal views.
  • Describe the effects of various types of brain damage and disease (i.e., strokes, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, etc.) upon the nervous system.
  • Describe the research on pre/post natal development of the brain and neuroplasticity.
  • Explain the role of natural selection in nervous system functioning
  • Explain the neural impulse in terms of the voltage and chemical changes that occur in the neuron.
  • Explain the process of synaptic transmission and the hypothesized effects of neurotransmitters on behavior.
  • Analyze the different methods of investigation of the nervous system.
  • Classify the different types of neurons and glial cells in the nervous system.
  • Evaluate the research evidence concerning the role that different brain areas play in the following behaviors and/or functions: perception, biological rhythms, motivation and emotion, sexual behaviors, response to stress, learning and memory, lateralization and languages.
  • Appraise the role of genetics in understanding behavior and/or nervous system functioning.
Child Development SOC 15
  • Students will be able to apply a sociological understanding physical growth and social, emotional, and cognitive development from conception to adolescence across all major concepts of child development.
  • Students will be able to apply a sociological understanding of the various social and environmental forces that shape child development.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will know major concepts of child development.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
Child Growth and Lifespan Development CHLD 10
  • Students completing CHLD 10 - Child Growth and Development will be able to summarize and compare theories of development.
  • Students completing CHLD 10 - Child Growth and Development will be able to describe typical development in the physical, cognitive, and social/emotional domains throughout the lifespan.
  • Students completing CHLD 10 - Child Growth and Development will be able to identify biological and environmental factors that influence development from conception through the end of life.
  • Students completing CHLD 10 - Child Growth and Development will be able to collect and analyze data on relationships, skills, and competencies at various ages throughout the life span..
  • Students completing CHLD 10 - Child Growth and Development will be able to analyze data from observations of a child's play focusing on its various developmental functions.
  • Students completing CHLD 10 - Child Growth and Development will be able to demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
Child Growth and Lifespan Development- Honors CHLD 10H
  • Students completing CHLD 10H - Child Growth and Development - Honors will be able to describe typical development in the physical, cognitive, and social/emotional domains throughout the lifespan.
  • Students completing CHLD 10H - Child Growth and Development - Honors will be able to identify biological and environmental factors that influence development from conception through the end of life.
  • Students completing CHLD 10H - Child Growth and Development - Honors will be able to summarize and compare theories of development.
  • Students completing CHLD 10H - Child Growth and Development - Honors will be able to collect and analyze data on relationships, skills, and competencies at various ages throughout the lifespan.
  • Students completing CHLD 10H - Child Growth and Development - Honors will be able to demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
Child, Family, School, and Community CHLD 1
  • Students completing CHLD 1 - Child, Family and Community will be able to identify and analyze theories of socialization that address the interrelationship of child, family, and community as well as family systems, beliefs and dynamics that promote healthy family relationships.
  • Students completing CHLD 1 - Child, Family and Community will be able to examine and describe the agents of socialization (family, peers, school, media and community) and social issues that influence the developing child.
  • Students completing CHLD 1 - Child, Family and Community will be able to critically assess how changing educational, political, social, economic and cultural factors directly impact the lives of children and families.
  • Students completing CHLD 1 - Child, Family and Community will be able to explore and evaluate community support services and agencies that are available to families, develop referral skills that help children and families access empowering community resources and analyze effective advocacy skills that establish effectual public policies pertaining to children and families
  • Students completing CHLD 1 - Child, Family and Community will be able to critique strategies that support and empower families through respectful, reciprocal relationships to involve all families in their children's development and learning.
  • Students enrolled in CHLD 1 will be able to analyze one’s own goals and sense of self as related to family history and life experiences, assessing how this impacts relationships with children and families.
Contemporary Health Issues BIOL 5
  • Students completing an assignment in Area E courses will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
  • Students will be able to identify patterns of disease and disability in the U.S.
  • Students will be able to describe the components of a behavior modification program.
  • Students will be able to examine the effects of stress on physical and mental health.
  • Students will be able to identify the benefits of prenatal care and testing.
  • Students will be able to describe risk reduction strategies for preventing sexually transmitted diseases.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the interaction between fitness and nutrition and chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer.
  • Students will be able to describe the effects of psychoactive drugs on multiple body systems.
  • Students will be able to identify risk factors for intentional and unintentional injuries.
  • Students will be able to synthesize the interaction of multiple environmental hazards.
  • Students will be able to analyze problems in health care delivery in the U.S.
  • Students will be able to compare and evaluate elements of a nutritionally healthy diet.
  • Students will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
Developmental Psychology PSYC 14
  • Apply major theories in developmental psychology. (changed from identify to apply - 7/3/13)
  • Evaluate the relative contributions of nature and nurture to human development.
  • Analyze the developmental changes that take place during the prenatal, infancy, early and middle childhood, adolescence, early adulthood, middle adulthood stages, and later adulthood, and death.
  • Analyze the attachment process and its impact on psychological development throughout the lifespan.
  • Analyze the stages of bereavement and death with an understanding of cultural differences.
  • Compare the major development theorists including Erikson, Piaget, Vygotsky, Ainsworth, Lorenz, Levinson, Watson, Skinner, Kohlberg, Gilligan, White and Freud.
  • Evaluate scientific research methods (longitudinal, cross-sectional, sequential, twin method) used in developmental psychology.
  • Evaluate the historical and current traditional approaches to the study of developmental psychology.
  • Evaluate the Nature versus Nurture Controversy as it applies to developmental psychology.
  • Evaluate the implication of cultural processes on the psychological development of the individual.
  • Students will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social institutions and human behavior.
Elementary Statistics Math 110
  • Determine the appropriate statistical methods by data type and number of populations or treatments.
  • Utilize statistical techniques with a variety of applications that pertain to business, the social, natural and physical sciences.
  • Students will be able to determine descriptive statistics from a sample
  • Students will be able to use sample statistics to develop a confidence interval for population parameters
  • Using sample statistics from one or more samples, students will be able to test a claim made about a population parameter.
  • Using bivariate data, students will be able to determine whether a significant linear correlation exists between two variables and determine the equation of the regression line.
  • Math 110 students will feel comfortable in their math class.
  • Math 110 students will demonstrate the thinking skill of accurate self-assessment.
  • Math 110 students will feel that mathematics is a beneficial part of their education.
  • Math 110 students will feel they have the resources necessary for their success.
  • Math 110 students will demonstrate the ability and willingness to take the steps necessary to succeed in their math class.
  • Define basic statistical terms and notation.
  • Describe the proper methods of sampling.
  • Describe the distributions of quantitative data in terms of center, shape, and spread.
  • Infer from observational and experimental studies.
  • Explain the basic concepts of probability theory and calculate probabilities.
  • Employ the principles of inferential statistics in estimation and hypothesis testing.
  • Utilize computer technology in statistical analyses.
Elementary Statistics -Honors Math 110H
  • Students will be able to determine descriptive statistics from a sample.
  • Students will be able to use sample statistics to develop a confidence interval for population parameters
  • Using sample statistics from one or more samples, students will be able to test a claim made about a population parameter
  • Using bivariate data, students will be able to determine whether a significant linear correlation exists between two variables and determine the equation of the regression line.
  • Math 110H students will feel comfortable in their math class.
  • Math 110H students will demonstrate the thinking skill of accurate self-assessment.
  • Math 110H students will feel that mathematics is a beneficial part of their education.
  • Math 110H students will feel they have the resources necessary for their success.
  • Math 110H students will demonstrate the ability and willingness to take the steps necessary to succeed in their math class.
  • Define basic statistical terms and notation.
  • Describe the proper methods of sampling.
  • Describe the distributions of quantitative data in terms of center, shape, and spread.
  • Infer from observational and experimental studies.
  • Explain the basic concepts of probability theory and calculate probabilities.
  • Determine the appropriate statistical methods by data type and number of populations or treatments.
  • Employ the principles of inferential statistics in estimation and hypothesis testing.
  • Utilize statistical techniques with a variety of applications that pertain to business, the social, natural and physical sciences.
  • Utilize computer technology in statistical analyses.
  • Demonstrate ability to combine appropriate data gathering techniques and ability to express statistical conclusions in formal writing to complete a large, semester-long project.
Fundamentals of Genetics BIOL 34
  • Students will be able to determine the mode of inheritance of a human genetic disorder from examining a pedigree of inheritance of that disorder.
  • Students will be able to solve genetics problems including those involving dominance, incomplete dominance, multiple genes, sex linkage, and epistasis.
  • Students will be able to solve genetics problems involving linkage and recombination.
  • Students will be able to describe the components of the eukaryotic genome.
  • Students will be able to relate the structures of DNA to DNA replication.
  • Students will be able to explain the process of RNA and protein synthesis and how these processes are regulated.
  • Students will be able to describe the role of gene expression in development using specific genes as examples.
  • Students will be able to describe types of mutations at the molecular level.
  • Students will be able to describe types of mutations at the chromosomal level including aneuploidies, deletions, duplications, inversions and translocations.
  • Students will be able to discuss the relationship between mutation and molecular evolution and evolution in organisms.
  • Students will be able to describe the methods and applications of recombinant DNA technology.
  • Students will be able to identify and discuss the ethical and moral implications of genetic technology including recombinant DNA technology.
  • students will be able to provide the correct map distance between genes with data from a three point cross.
General Cultural Anthropology ANTH 22
  • Students will be able to examine the field of anthropology and its history as a holistic discipline.
  • Students will be able to explain ethnographic field work and cultural relativism.
  • Students will be able to identify and analyze ethnocentric attitudes and beliefs in themselves and as expressed by others.
  • Students will be able to illustrate the evolution of culture through the development of civilization.
  • Students will be able to distinguish human language as a unique form of communication.
  • Students will be able to explain and analyze the potential influence of culture on personality development, and on the structure of marriage and the motivation for particular marriage rules.
  • Students will be able to analyze and describe differences between kinship and nonkinship systems of organization in various societies, as well as the various patterns of political organizations.
  • Students will be able to contrast and compare the various subsistence patterns required in various environments including methods of exchange and differences in consumption practices.
  • Students will be able to contrast and compare the universal functions of religion and art in various cultures.
  • Students will be able to evaluate and describe the influence of American culture on various ethnic groups.
  • Students will be able to identify and predict the current and future problems facing humanity.
Geography of California GEOG 30
  • Analyze the relationship between humans and the environment of California.
  • Recognize and evaluate how human and physical processes differ from place to place and analyze the distributional and locational relationship of things in the state of California.
  • Describe the physical processes that shape the natural environments of California.
  • Explain patterns of urban development in the state and distinguish current trends in urban development in California.
  • Explain the origins and development of agriculture and industry in California.
  • Analyze the influence of varying cultural and ethnic groups in the shaping of the cultural landscapes of California.
  • Analyze the use of natural resources in the state, particularly the role of water in the development of both the economic and social landscape of California.
  • Identify and evaluate how human and physical processes differ from place to place and be able to analyze the distributional and locational relationship of things in the state of California.
Geography of California - Honors GEOG 30H
  • Analyze the relationship between humans and the environment of California.
  • Recognize and evaluate how human and physical processes differ from place to place and analyze the distributional and locational relationship of things in the state of California.
  • Describe the physical processes that shape the natural environments of California.
  • Explain patterns of urban development in the state and distinguish current trends in urban development in California.
  • Explain the origins and development of agriculture and industry in California.
  • Analyze the influence of varying cultural and ethnic groups in the shaping of the cultural landscapes of California.
  • Analyze the use of natural resources in the state, particularly the role of water in the development of both the economic and social landscape of California.
  • Identify and evaluate how human and physical processes differ from place to place and be able to analyze the distributional and locational relationship of things in the state of California.
History of Africa HIST 35
  • Students will be able to identify through analysis the role of institutions (religious, political, economic, social, educational, etc.) in the development of African culture.
  • Students will be able to identify and evaluate major agents of change/reform in African History
  • Students completing an assignment in Humanities Area C will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area D2 courses will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
History of Asia HIST 11
  • Students completing an assignment in Area C (Arts) courses will be able to analyze modes of artistic expression
  • Students will be able to identify and evaluate major agents of change/reform in Asian History
  • Students will be able to identify through analysis the role of institutions (religious, political, economic, social, educational, etc.) in the development of Asian culture.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area D2 courses will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior
History of Asia HIST 10
  • Students will be able to identify and evaluate major agents of change/reform in Asian History
  • Students will be able to identify through analysis the role of institutions (religious, political, economic, social, educational, etc.) in the development of Asian culture.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area D2 courses will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will be able to identify and evaluate major agents of change/reform in Asian history.
  • Students completing an assignment in Humanities Area C will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression
History of Native Americans HIST 44
  • Students will be able to identify and evaluate major agents of change/reform in Native American History
  • Students will be able to identify through analysis the role of institutions--religious, political, economic, social, educational, etc.) in the development of Native American culture.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area D2 courses will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior
History of the African American HIST 31
  • Students completing an assignment in Area C (Arts) courses will be able to analyze modes of artistic expression
  • Students will be able to differentiate among changes in American Constitutional government over time as those changes effect African Americans within the political/constitutional process.
  • Students will be able to identify and evaluate major agents of change/reform in the role and place of African Americans in American History.
History of the African American HIST 30
  • Students will be able to differentiate among changes in American Constitutional government over time as those changes effect African Americans within the political/constitutional process.
  • Students will be able to identify and evaluate major agents of change/reform in the role and place of African Americans in American History.
  • Students completing an assignment in Humanities Area C will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression
  • Students will be able to differentiate among changes in the American constitutional government over time.
History of the Mexican American HIST 40
  • Students will be able to identify and evaluate major agents of change/reform in American History effecting Mexican Americans
  • Students will be able to identify through analysis the role of institutions--religious, political, economic, social, educational, etc.) in the development of Mexican American culture.
  • Students completing an assignment in Humanities Area C will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression
  • Students completing an assignment in Area C (Arts) courses will be able to analyze modes of artistic expression.
History of the United States HIST 1
  • Students will be able to differentiate among changes in the American constitutional government over time
  • Students will comprehend the basic elements of the American Constitution, including the Bill of Rights and important Constitutional Amendments relating to the Reconstruction Era and the Progressive Era. Students will understand the significance of the Supreme Court's enforcement of the Constitution.
  • Students will be able to identify and evaluate major agents of change/reform in American History.
  • Students completing an assignment in Area C (Arts) courses will be able to analyze modes of artistic expression.
History of the United States HIST 8
  • Students will be able to identify and evaluate major agents of change/reform in American History
  • Students will be able to differentiate among changes in American Constitutional government over time.
  • Students will be able to differentiate among changes in the American constitutional government over time.
  • Students completing an assignment in Area C (Arts) courses will be able to analyze modes of artistic expression
History of the United States HIST 7
  • Students will be able to differentiate among changes in American Constitutional government over time.
  • Students will be able to identify and evaluate major agents of change/reform in American History
  • Students completing an assignment in Humanities Area C will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression
  • Students will be able to differentiate among changes in the American constitutional government over time
History of the United States - Honors HIST 8H
  • Students will be able to identify and evaluate major agents of change/reform in American History
  • Students will be able to differentiate among changes in American Constitutional government over time.
History of the United States - Honors HIST 7H
  • Students will be able to differentiate among changes in American Constitutional government over time.
  • Students will be able to identify and evaluate major agents of change/reform in American History
Human Geography GEOG 2
  • Describe the tools and theories used in geographic research.
  • Evaluate the relationship of humans and the environment.
  • Analyze the spatial variation of humans and their activities around the world.
  • Describe the scope of the discipline of geography and the tools used by geographers to study human processes on the earth.
  • Analyze the spatial expression and cultural impacts of contemporary globalization.
  • Describe the distribution of humans globally and explain the tools used by geographers to evaluate human population change.
  • Synthesize theories of human migration to explain historical and contemporary patterns of human mobility.
  • Explain spatial variation of and describe patterns of cultural and social expression including language, religion, ethnicity, race, gender, sexuality, political processes, urbanization, development, agriculture, manufacturing and service economies.
  • Describe human impacts on the environment including impacts of the use of renewable and non-renewable energy resources.
Human Geography - Honors GEOG 2H
  • Analyze the spatial variation of humans and their activities around the world.
  • Evaluate the relationship between humans and the environment.
  • Describe the tools and theories used in geographic research.
  • Describe the scope of the discipline of geography and the tools used by geographers to study human processes on the earth.
  • Analyze the spatial expression and cultural impacts of contemporary globalization.
  • Describe the distribution of humans globally and explain the tools used by geographers to evaluate human population change.
  • Synthesize theories of human migration to explain historical and contemporary patterns of human mobility.
  • Explain spatial variation of and describe patterns of cultural and social expression including language, religion, ethnicity, race, gender, sexuality, political processes, urbanization, development, agriculture, manufacturing and service economies.
  • Describe human impacts on the environment including impacts of the use of renewable and non-renewable energy resources.
Human Reproduction, Development and Aging BIOL 13
  • Students will compare and evaluate opposing positions on a controversial issue in lifespan development.
  • Students completing an assignment in Area E courses will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
  • Students will be able to explain the major developmental theories and scientific methods used to study development.
  • Students will be able to describe male and female sexual anatomy and physiology, including sex hormones and their actions.
  • Students will be able to describe cell division, and the principles of genetics, with special emphasis on their impact on human development.
  • Students will be able to explain conception, embryological and fetal development, and the birth process, as well as problems that may arise in any of these stages.
  • Students will able to summarize the biophysical, cognitive, and psychosocial development of infants, toddlers, children, adolescents and adults, and factors that influence these developmental areas.
  • Students will be able to discuss the impact of death in our Western culture, and how we deal with dying, death, loss and bereavement.
Human Sexuality BIOL 15
  • Students will compare and evaluate opposing positions on a controversial issue in human sexuality.
  • Students demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being
  • Students will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
Human Sexuality - Honors BIOL 15H
  • Students completing an assignment in Area E courses will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
  • Students will be able to describe how cultural values and ethics influence human sexuality.
  • Students will be able to judge the validity of sexual research.
  • Students will be able to explain behavioral aspects of human sexuality, regarding gender, relationships and communication.
  • Students will be able to describe male and female sexual anatomy, physiology and sexual response.
  • Students will be able to describe common sexual disorders and therapies, and the sexual abilities and needs of disabled people.
  • Students will be able to outline the characteristics of major sexually transmitted diseases.
  • Students will be able to explain the multi-faceted aspects of sexual orientation.
  • Students will be able to explain sexuality over the lifespan.
  • Students will be able to outline the advantages and disadvantages of various family planning methods.
  • Students will be able to describe the events of pregnancy, delivery, and how to enhance the birth of a healthy baby.
  • Students will be able to describe common variations in sexual behavior.
  • Students will be able to discuss issues of power, violence and commercialization of sexuality.
  • Students will be able to compare and evaluate opposing positions on a controversial issue in human sexuality.
  • Students demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
  • Students will be able to analyze controversies related to current issues in sexual science, and construct reasonable solutions/compromises.
  • Students will be able to locate seminal articles related to a field of sexology and critically evaluate the subsequent progression of data and hypotheses.
  • Students will be able to synthesize data collected from a literature review, meta-analysis and/or original research in an area of interest related to human sexuality.
Humans and the Environment BIOL 6
  • Students will develop intelligent activism in efforts to save the environment from deterioration.
  • Students will learn ecological principles, differentiate which ecological principles relate to specific ecological situations inspected in class and/or determine the relevance of environmental science to their daily lives
  • Appraise the complexities of the biological and environmental problems confronting humans.
  • Integrate ecological principles into everyday thought and apply them to decision- making.
  • Illustrate the basic ecological concept that everything living and non-living is interconnected.
  • Examine the differences between a frontier society and a sustainable earth society.
  • Contrast the laws of matter and thermodynamics and assess their connections to pollution.
  • Evaluate the concept of carrying capacity as it relates to the earth's resources and matter recycling systems.
  • Evaluate the "J"-shaped curves of increasing population, natural resource use and pollution with respect to their ability to disrupt the earth's life support system.
  • Evaluate the task of moving from simplistic, linear thinking to circular, cybernetic thinking that is harmonious with the ecological cycles that sustain us.
Intercultural Communication SPCH 7
  • Students will examine the relationship between communication and culture.
  • Students will evaluate their own intercultural competencies
  • Students will demonstrate cultural sensitivity in conflict management
  • Students will examine cultural factors that influence perceptions.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will feel more confident.
  • Students will define culture.
Intercultural Communication - Honors SPCH 7H
  • Students will examine the relationship between communication and culture.
  • Students will feel more confident.
  • Students will define culture.
  • Students will evaluate their own intercultural competencies
  • Students will demonstrate cultural sensitivity in conflict management
  • Students will examine cultural factors that influence perceptions.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
Introduction to Criminology SOC 5
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will know major concepts of criminology.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
  • Students will be able to use criminological theories and research to analyze of the nature, extent, and causes of crime and delinquency.
  • Students will be able to apply a sociological understanding to assess how race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and age affect victimization patterns, arrest rates, charges, sentencing, and treatment of criminals.
Introduction to Electronic Media R-TV 01
  • All RTV program students will have an increased awareness of skills required for full-time work in the entertainment industry.
  • All RTV program students will have an increased awareness of professionals in the entertainment industry.
  • Identify key developments in the history of major U.S. electronic media industries, especially their evolution as social, political, and economic forces in U.S. society.
  • Describe the technical evolution of electronic media.
  • Identify the principal means of economic and political support for different electronic media, and discuss their impact.
  • Analyze regulations of electronic media.
  • Define commonly-used electronic communication technology.
  • Identify the business structure and revenue streams for each medium.
Introduction to Gerontology SOC 4
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will know major concepts of gerontology.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
Introduction to Human Services PSYC 17
  • Evaluate how the following factors affect services clients receive: culture, language, financial status, intellect, educational level, physical ability, mental health, age, gender, sexual orientation.
  • Achieve more clarity in one's own desire to pursue a career in Human Service.
  • Apply modalities to interacting and communicating with clients.
  • Differentiate models of human service delivery.
Introduction to International Relations POLI 9
  • Define, explain, analyze and compare core theories in International Relations and explain which theory best describes international relations and why.
  • Describe the International Relations concept Levels of Analysis and argue which level, or levels, best explains and analyzes international relations.
  • Describe the roles of national, international, transnational and sub-national actors in promoting or hindering international cooperation.
  • Analyze and evaluate key topics such as globalization, conflict, cooperation, diplomacy, international law, human rights, and international political economy.
  • Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the United Nations, World Trade Organization, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the Cold War and its aftermath, the politics of the Middle East and American foreign policy.
  • Explain the impact of important historical events on the contemporary study of international relations and world politics.
  • Explain two theories of International Relations and argue which theory best explains International Relations and support said theory with appropriate evidence.
  • Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the United Nations, World Trade Organization, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the Cold War and its Aftermath, the politics of the Middle East and American foreign policy.
  • Analyze the relationship between social, political and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Explain the impact of important historical events on the contemporary study of international relations and world politics.
  • Students demonstrate comprehension of two theories of International Relations, able to argue which theory best explains International Relations support said argument with appropriate evidence.
Introduction to Psychology PSYC 1A
  • Differentiate the major theoretical perspectives of psychology.
  • Demonstrate psychology is a science by explaining how psychology utilizes the scientific method.
  • Apply psychological principles to personal observations and / or experiences.
  • Identify the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, core empirical findings, and historic trends in psychology.
  • Compare and contrast major theoretical perspectives of psychology (e.g., psychoanalytic, behavioral, humanistic, etc.)
  • Apply concepts and theories from the following general domains: (a) biological bases of behavior and mental processes, (b) sensation and perception, (c) consciousness, (d) learning and memory, (e) cognition, intelligence, and language (f) lifespan development (g) motivation and emotion, (h) gender and sexuality, (i) stress and health, (j) social psychology, (k) personality, and (l) psychological disorders and approaches to treatment.
  • Apply psychological principles to personal experience.
  • Compare and contrast research methods in psychology, including advantages and disadvantages of each (e.g., observation, case study, survey, correlational method, experimental method).
  • Distinguish between scientific and non-scientific methods of understanding.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social institutions and human behavior.
Introduction to Psychology - Honors PSYC 1AH
  • Be able to differentiate the major theoretical perspectives of psychology.
  • Explain how psychology utilizes the scientific method
  • Apply psychological principles to personal experiences.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social institutions and human behavior.
Latino Politics in the United States POLI 25
  • Students will be able to identify significant changes that have occurred over the past two decades in representation by latinos in American government and politics.
  • Students will be able to identify similarities and differences in public opinion held by different Latino communities such as Mexican-Americans and Cuban-Americans.
  • Students will be able to differentiate among changes in the American constitutional government over time.
Marriage and the Family SOC 14
  • Students will use sociological concepts to identify the intersection of race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups as well as the impact on the socialization and interaction within the changing family.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will know major concepts of marriage and family.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
Marriage and the Family - Honors SOC 14H
  • Students will use sociological concepts to identify the intersection of race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups as well as the impact on the socialization and interaction within the changing family.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will know major concepts of marriage and family.
Mass Media and Society JOUR 100
  • Students will understand the respective functions of the fields that comprise the mass media, advertising, and public relations.
  • Students will be familiar with basic mass media law and ethics.
Neurobiology and Behavior BIOL 17
  • Students will be able to evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives (area B GEO being used as course level SLO).
  • Students will be able to describe how the nervous and endocrine systems cooperate to generate and control behavior.
  • Students will be able to construct time-activity budgets for various animal species.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast proximate and ultimate causes of behavior.
  • Students will be able to design zoo exhibits that would be appropriate for a particular animal's behavioral requirements.
  • Students will be able to describe how evolution could select for particular types of behaviors.
  • Students will be able to explain the role of cultural transmission in the behavior of animals.
  • Students will be able to assess the costs and benefits of various behaviors such as eating seeds instead of insects or sleeping instead of looking for food.
  • Students will be able to describe evolutionary processes. Students will be able to correctly describe the evolutionary process and be able to explain how this process can shape the behavior of an animal.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Students will be able to correctly identify the method of training seen in an animal show and be able to apply it to determine how the behavior was trained.
  • Students will be able to more accurately identify animals after attending a field trip.
Political Science POLI 1
  • Marshall empirical data to support a political science theory.
  • Differentiate among changes in the American constitutional government over time.
  • Identify constitutional amendments, which have expanded the right to vote.
  • Differentiate powers delegated to the U.S. from those reserved to the states.
  • Evaluate the role of political parties, interest groups, elections and the mass media in the American political system with an emphasis on the state of California and its relations to the national government.
  • Evaluate the role of Congress, the presidency, the courts and their interaction with state and local governments.
  • Analyze policy areas such as foreign and economic policy, civil rights and civil liberties, environmental and educational policies in order to predict or evaluate the consequences of various policy alternatives.
  • Differentiate powers delegated to the U.S. from those reserved to the states.
  • Identify constitutional amendments which have expanded the right to vote.
Political Science - Honors POLI 1H
  • Students completing Political Science 1 will be able to marshall empirical data to support a theory.
  • Students will be able to differentiate among changes in the American constitutional government over time.
Principles of Cultural Anthropology ANTH 5
  • Students will be able to recognize the immense scope of the multi-faceted discipline of anthropology and explain the relationships between its basic areas of inquiry: physical anthropology, cultural anthropology, linguistics and archaeology.
  • Students will be able to assess the historical development of anthropology as a Western academic discipline, giving particular attention to the significant contributions and perspectives of women, minority and non-Western cultural anthropologists.
  • Students will be able to examine the basic conceptual framework which structures the anthropological study of humanity, identifying the crucial distinctions between ethnocentrism and the practice of cultural relativism.
  • Students will be able to analyze the key methodological practices of cultural anthropology, with its major focus on pursuing ethnographic research through fieldwork.
  • Students will be able to relate how the processes in any cultural system operate by analyzing the integrated, synergistic nature of all such systems.
  • Students will be able to recognize the diversity of human cultures by contrasting comparative ethnographic information from a significant variety of world societies.
  • Students will be able to critically evaluate the dynamics of culture change (both voluntary and involuntary), and apply this knowledge to understanding the complexities of culturally heterogeneous societies.
  • Students will be able to analyze how anthropological knowledge and insights can be applied to current societal issues, and then be extrapolated to an analytic evaluation of humanity's future.
Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics BUSC 1A
  • Students completing BUSC 1A - Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics will correctly know the use of monetary policy and make comments on the monetary policy being used by the FED.
  • Students completing BUSC 1A - Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics will correctly know the use of fiscal policy and will be able to comment on the fiscal policy used by the government.
  • Students completing BUSC 1A - Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics will know Fiscal Policy, various types of Fiscal Policies, and the tools available to the federal government to use Fiscal Policy. The students will also know the difference between an expansionary and a contractionary fiscal policy.
  • Students completing BUSC 1A - Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics will know the monetary policy and the tools available to the Fed to use a certain type of monetary policy. The students will know the difference between an expansionary monetary policy and a contractionary monetary policy.
  • Students completing BUSC 1A - Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics will be able to discuss current fiscal policy of the federal government and will be able to form their opinion.
  • The students were asked to write a report on the use of fiscal policy used during Reagan administration. They were asked to discuss the 1981 Economic Recovery Act (ERA) and its effect on the economic activity during that period. More than 80% of the students were able to explain the fiscal policy and 1981 ERA effects on the economy with a clear understanding of the fiscal policy. (2017-18) Students were asked to write a summary report of 1981 Economic Recovery Act and compare it with Tax Reform of 2017. More than 80% of the students were able to highlight the similarities between two tax reforms, corporate income tax rates cuts and personal income tax rates cuts. They were able explain the expected impact in these tax rates cuts on unemployment rates in the economy. They were able to relate the recent news of bonuses given to employees as a result of corporate income tax rate cuts and got more than 80% score.
Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics - Honors BUSC 1AH
  • Students completing BUSC 1AH - Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics - Honors will correctly know the use of monetary policy and will be able to comment on the monetary policy used by the FED.
  • Students completing BUSC 1AH - Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics - Honors will correctly know the use of fiscal policy and will be able to comment on the fiscal policy being used by the government.
  • Students completing BUSC 1AH - Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics - Honors will know Fiscal Policy, various types of Fiscal Policies, and the tools available to the federal government to use Fiscal Policy. The students will also know the difference between an expansionary and a contractionary fiscal policy.
  • Students completing BUSC 1AH - Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics - Honors will know the monetary policy and the tools available to the Fed to use a certain type of monetary policy. The students will know the difference between an expansionary monetary policy and a contractionary monetary policy.
Principles of Economics - Microeconomics BUSC 1B
  • Students were asked to determine the merits of price-quantity determination in the market economy of the Unites States.
  • Students completing BUSC 1B - Principles of Economics - Microeconomics will correctly know consumer's behavior to maximize their utility in allocating scarce resources to satisfy their infinite wants.
  • Students completing BUSC 1B - Principles of Economics - Microeconomics will be able to choose quantities of different commodities having different price tags by spending limited amount of money to maximize satisfaction
  • Students completing BUSC 1B - Principles of Economics - Microeconomics will use producer's behavior to determine price of the product they produce under various market situations to maximize profit
  • Students were asked to discuss the reason for not giving welfare recipients their welfare benefits in cash rather than in-kind.
  • Students should be able to distinguish between public and private goods. Students should also be able to explain why private market fails to provide public goods.
  • Students should be able explain externalities and distinguish between external costs and external benefits.
Principles of Economics -Microeconomics - Honors BUSC 1BH
  • Students completing BUSC 1BH - Principles of Economics - Microeconomics - Honors will know to allocate scarce resources on various commodities to maximize satisfaction
  • Students completing BUSC 1BH - Principles of Economics - Microeconomics - Honors will use producer's behavior to determine price of the product they produce under various market situations to maximize profit
  • Students completing BUSC 1BH - Principles of Economics - Microeconomics - Honors will correctly know the consumers' behavior to maximize their utility by allocating scarce resources.
  • Students completing BUSC 1BH - Principles of Economics - Microeconomics - Honors will correctly know the producers' behavior to maximize their profit by allocating scarce resources.
  • Students should be able to distinguish between public goods and private goods. Students should be able to explain why private market fails to provide public goods.
  • Students were given a research paper to discuss and analyze "Coase Theorem" with respect to market failure and government intervention in the presence of externalities. They were asked to use examples to make their point. 100% of the student were able to discuss "Coase Theorem" properly citing some other research studies. All students got over 85% score in this paper.
Psychology of Sexuality PSYC 26
  • Identify and describe sexual and reproductive anatomy, physiology, and sexual responses.
  • Describe differences in sexual attitudes and behaviors based on diversity.
  • Demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing your lifelong personal well-being.
  • Describe historical and current research methods in studying human sexuality.
  • Describe dysfunctional and atypical sexual behaviors and therapy
  • Describe the sexual marketplace and discuss potentially controversial issues related to prostitution and pornography.
  • Describe sexuality from conception, pregnancy, and birth to childhood, adolescence, and adulthood.
  • Describe the implications of various types of sexual aggression and violence.
  • Explain various types of love, communication, and sexual behaviors in relationships.
  • Identify various structures of male and female sexual anatomy and discuss their functions in the physiology of human sexual responding.
  • Identify symptoms of various sexually transmitted diseases and discuss their prevalence, transmission, and treatment.
  • Analyze and evaluate different theories of gender and sexual orientation.
  • Compare and contrast various methods of contraception.
Race, Culture, Sex, and Mass Media Images JOUR 107
  • Students will recognize how the mass media contributes to racial, cultural, gender, and sexual stereotyping.
  • Students will analyze how the mass media and advertising contributes to racial, cultural, gender, and sexual stereotyping.
Sociology SOC 2
  • Students will be able to understand and demonstrate the analysis of how controversial public issues arise in contemporary American society and the interplay between race, class, gender, sexuality and other social groups.
  • Students will be able to identify and analyze how sociological principles and concepts are applied in the understanding of social problems.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
Sociology SOC 1
  • Students will identify and apply the main sociological theoretical frameworks to analyze social stratification based on race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups.
  • Students will apply sociological research to distinguish the interrelatedness of various social intuitions and the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will identify the role of culture and socialization in the development of one’s beliefs, opinions, and values.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will know major concepts of sociology.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
Sociology - Honors SOC 1H
  • Students will identify and apply the main sociological theoretical frameworks to analyze social stratification based on race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups.
  • Students will apply sociological research to distinguish the interrelatedness of various social intuitions and the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will thoroughly know the major concepts of General Sociology.
  • Students will demonstrate an thorough understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will thoroughly analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students will identify the role of culture and socialization in the development of one’s beliefs, opinions, and values.
Sociology - Honors SOC 2H
  • Students will be able to identify and analyze how sociological principles and concepts are applied in the understanding of social problems.
  • Students will be able to understand and demonstrate the analysis of how controversial public issues arise in contemporary American society and the interplay between race, class, gender, sexuality and other social groups.
  • Students will demonstrate an thorough understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will thoroughly analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior
  • Students will know major concepts of social problems.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
Sociology of Ethnic Relations SOC 20
  • Students will know major concepts of race and ethnicity.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will use sociological research concepts and theories to identify and analyze the social constructions of race and ethnicity, its interactions with different aspects of society, and its impact on the experiences of different racial/ethnic groups.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
  • Students will use sociological research concepts and theories to identify and analyze the social constructions of race and ethnicity, its interactions with different aspects of society, and its impact on the experiences of different racial/ethnic groups.
Sociology of Ethnic Relations - Honors SOC 20H
  • Students will know major concepts of the sociology of race and ethnic relations.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students will use sociological research concepts and theories to identify and analyze the social constructions of race and ethnicity, its interactions with different aspects of society, and its impact on the experiences of different racial/ethnic groups.
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences PSYC 10
  • Perform and evaluate descriptive (e.g., mean, median, mode, variance, standard deviation) and inferential (e.g., Pearson correlation, t tests, z test, and one-way analysis of variance) statistics.
  • Using SPSS software, correctly input data, analyze data, and interpret output for descriptive statistics, t tests, correlation, and one-way analysis of variance.
  • Define and distinguish basic statistical terms and notation including scales of measurement.
  • Chart and interpret simple and cumulative frequency distributions.
  • Distinguish the difference between sample and population distributions and analyze the role played by the Central Limit Theorem.
  • Compute and describe the effects of various measures of central tendency and variability.
  • Describe and explain the normal curve including how z-scores are used and calculated.
  • Describe and interpret statistical error, effect size and power.
  • Formulate and test research hypotheses through the use of various inferential statistical procedures: t-tests, ANOVA, chi-square.
  • Compute and interpret descriptive statistics including correlation and regression.
  • Conduct and interpret statistical analyses using statistical software.
The Native American ANTH 30
  • Students will be able to evaluate theories of origins and genetic relationships of prehistoric Native American populations with Asian populations.
  • Students will be able to describe adaptive measures related to ecological influences in each culture area.
  • Students will be able to compare unique qualities of culture areas and determine common traits.
  • Students will be able to describe Native American contributions to the world in sciences and arts.
  • Students will be able to identify special problems faced today by Native Americans.
  • Students will be able to identify Native American locations on a map.
  • Students will be able to name and describe theories of origin for indigenous peoples of the America, and list specific facts that support the theories.
The Psychology of Women PSYC 25
  • Describe, compare and contrast the predominant theories of gender development.
  • Identify gender role messages in popular culture.
  • Demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to the role of gender in your personal experience.
  • Explain the concept of privilege as it relates to various minority groups.
  • Identify women's psychological and physical health issues and the response of the healthcare system in providing treatment.
  • Identify the sources of sex bias in psychological research and discuss gender-fair research methods and interpretations.
  • Define sexual orientation and identify issues related to the lesbian, bisexual, and transgender female experience.
  • Describe the prevalent theoretical perspectives, including the psychoanalytic and feminist perspectives, on gender identity development and gender differences.
  • Describe gender differences in verbal and nonverbal communication patterns and how language treatment differs between genders.
  • Describe psychological and physiological aspects of female sexuality and sexual dysfunctions.
  • Explain the rationale for the study of the Psychology of Women and define related terms (i.e., feminism, sexism, sex, gender, privilege, gender role).
  • Explain how ethnic, cultural and socioeconomic factors impact women's experience in the workplace.
  • Analyze how gender stereotypes, discrimination, gender role expectations, and family-related issues affect women.
  • Differentiate between real and stereotypic gender differences, such as differences in abilities, achievements, emotions, and motivation, and reasons for those differences.
  • Discuss female victimization, particularly in the areas of rape, intimate partner abuse, sexual harassment, and childhood sexual abuse.
  • Synthesize course information to develop more critical appraisal and analysis of gender-related issues in contemporary society, and identify future trends that will continue to affect women.
The Urban World GEOG 8
  • Describe the tools and theories used in research related to urban geographies.
  • Analyze the spatial variation of urban patterns around the world.
The Wild West - A History, 1800-1890 HIST 16
  • Students will be able to explain and evaluate the story of America's westward advance as part of the wider story of the development of the American nation and its democracy.
  • Using both primary and secondary sources, students will be able to determine and critically analyze competing perspectives on the history, culture, and society of the American West.
  • Analyze how different historians have assessed the history of the American West and its influence upon the development of the American nation and democracy.
Women in American History - Beyond the Stereotypes HIST 36
  • Students will be able to differentiate among changes in American Constitutional government over time effecting the status, positions, and/or role of women.
  • Students will be able to identify and evaluate major agents of change/reform in American History pertaining to women.
  • Students will be able to differentiate among changes in the American constitutional government over time
  • Students will be able to identify and evaluate major agents of change/reform in American history pertaining to women
  • Students completing an assignment in Area C (Arts) courses will be able to analyze modes of artistic expression.
World Regional Geography GEOG 5
  • Evaluate the geographic situation, problems and prospects for each world region.
  • Explain the geographic tools used in regional analysis.
  • Analyze the spatial variation of human activities and physical processes in distinctive world regions.
  • Define the concept of region in geographic analysis.
  • Identify the location of the world’s countries, major urban centers, bodies of water, and other landform features.
  • Explain patterns of physical processes in distinctive world regions including climate and landform evolution.
  • Explain patterns of human processes in distinctive world regions including demographics, migration, language, religion, ethnicity, political processes, development and economic activities.
  • Describe the physical, social, economic, political and cultural relationships between distinctive world regions.
  • Evaluate the primary causes of deforestation in Southeast Asia.
  • Analyze the impacts of colonialism in Sub-Saharan Africa.
  • Analyze the relationship between social, political and/or economic institutions and human behavior.