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Student Learning Outcomes

Discipline: Degree: AA - Liberal Arts Emphasis Environmental Studies - A0411
Course Name Course Number Objectives
Biology for Majors BIOL 4
  • Students completing this project will be able to demonstrate the ability to show the relevance of biology on their daily lives.
  • Students will have the ability to form a hypothesis, collect data, conduct statistical analysis, and interpret data.
  • Students will be able to examine the chemical organization and structure of cells, and relate these to cellular processes including transport, synthesis and cell reproduction.
  • Students will be able to apply principles of the scientific method in experimental situations and demonstrate explain the purpose and expected outcomes of laboratory experiments.
  • Students will be able to evaluate experimental results in the laboratory and explain why these may differ from expected results.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the components of the organizational hierarchy within the biosphere.
  • Students will be able to describe the structure of DNA, its mechanism of replication and the implications of this process on inheritance, evolution and biodiversity.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration, and explain the significance of the similarities and differences between the two processes.
  • Students will be able to integrate the principles of ecology to explain relationships within the biosphere and human impact on the planet.
Biology for Majors - Honors BIOL 4H
  • Students completing this project will be able to demonstrate the ability to show the relevance of biology on their daily lives.
  • Students will have the ability to form a hypothesis, collect data, conduct statistical analysis, and interpret data.
  • Students will be able to apply principles of the scientific method in experimental situations and demonstrate explain the purpose and expected outcomes of laboratory experiments.
  • Students will be able to evaluate experimental results in the laboratory and explain why these may differ from expected results.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the components of the organizational hierarchy within the biosphere.
  • Students will be able to describe the structure of DNA, its mechanism of replication and the implications of this process on inheritance, evolution and biodiversity.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration, and explain the significance of the similarities and differences between the two processes.
  • Students will be able to integrate the principles of ecology to explain relationships within the biosphere and human impact on the planet.
  • Students will be able to examine the chemical organization and structure of cells, and relate these to cellular processes including transport, synthesis and cell reproduction.
Calculus and Analytic Geometry Math 180
  • Students can compute instantaneous rates of change in applications
  • Students can evaluate integrals of elementary functions using the method of substitution.
  • Students can differentiate algebraic and transcendental functions
  • Students can solve optimization problems.
  • Math students feel they have the resources necessary for their success.
  • Students will feel that mathematics is a beneficial part of their education
  • Represent functions verbally, algebraically, numerically and graphically. Construct mathematical models of physical phenomena. Graph functions with transformations. Use logarithmic and exponential functions in applications. Solve calculus problems using a computer algebra system.
  • Prove limits using properties of limits and solve problems involving the formal definition of the limits. Solve problems involving continuity of functions. Evaluate limits at infinity and represent these graphically. Use limits to find slopes of tangent lines, velocities, other rates of change and derivatives.
  • Compute first and higher order derivatives of polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric functions. Evaluate derivatives using the product, quotient and chain rules and implicit differentiation.
  • Apply derivatives to rates of change and related rates problems, linear approximations and differentials, increasing and decreasing functions, maximum and minimum values, inflections and concavity, graphing, optimization problems, and Newton's Method. Apply the Mean Value Theorem in example problems. Use L'Hospital's Rule to evaluate limits of indeterminate forms. Use a Computer Algebra Systems in applications of calculus.
  • Evaluate indefinite integrals and definite integrals using the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Evaluate integrals using the substitution rule and integration by parts.
Calculus for Business Math 140
  • Students will understand the use of the derivative and be able to accurately differentiate a given function as suggested by the notation and/or the wording of the problem.
  • Students will understand the use of the integral and will be able to accurately integrate a given function as suggested by the notation and/or the wording of the problem.
  • Math students feel they have the resources necessary for their success.
  • Students will feel that mathematics is a beneficial part of their education
  • Evaluate the limit of a function.
  • Apply the definition of continuity.
  • Determine the first and higher-order derivatives for functions (algebraic, exponential, logarithmic and combinations of these), explicitly and implicitly.
  • Apply the derivative to curve sketching, related rates, and optimization problems.
  • Solve real-life problems using the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
  • Select and use the appropriate integration technique suitable to given problems.
  • Apply calculus techniques to analyze functions of several variables.
  • Analyze a variety of applied problems using calculus.
  • Solve separable differential equations.
Chemistry for Allied Health Majors CHEM 10
  • Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical bonding concepts such as writing the electron-dot (Lewis) structure, predicting molecular geometry, and determining whether a given bond is ionic, nonpolar covalent or polar-covalent.
  • Students enrolling in CHEM 10 are able to perform appropriate algebra skills.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of acid-base concepts such as predicting products of neutralization reaction, comparing relative acidity of solutions based on pH, and calculating the concentrations of hydronium ions, hydroxide ions, and pH of acidic and basic solutions.
  • Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical bonding concepts such as writing the electron-dot (Lewis) structure, predicting molecular geometry, and determining whether a given bond is ionic, nonpolar covalent or polar-covalent.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives. This GEO assessment was based on the topic of Reaction Rates
  • Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of acid-base concepts such as predicting products of neutralization reaction, comparing relative acidity of solutions based on pH, and calculating the concentrations of hydronium ions, hydroxide ions, and pH of acidic and basic solutions.
  • Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical bonding concepts such as writing the electron-dot (Lewis) structure, predicting molecular geometry, and determining whether a given bond is ionic, nonpolar covalent or polar-covalent.
  • Chem 10 student will be successful at defining a chemical reaction and identifying the observations that indicate a chemical reaction.
  • 1) Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of acid-base concepts such as comparing relative acidity of solutions based on pH 2) Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of acid-base concepts such as calculating the concentrations of hydronium ions, hydroxide ions, and pH of acidic and basic solutions
  • Express measurements using correct significant figures. Perform calculations, set up and solve problems using conversion factors.
  • Analyze the structure of an atom, and write electron configurations for elements in the Periodic Table.
  • Differentiate types of radioactivity, contrast methods of medical applications, write nuclear equations and solve problems relating to half-lives of radioactive substances.
  • Identify the types of bonds, predict bond polarity, and write the names or formulas for inorganic compounds.
  • Compare and contrast the three states of matter and forms of energy. Evaluate energy profiles of chemical reactions and calculate the energy for changes of state.
  • Complete and balance various types of chemical equations including oxidation-reduction reactions. Apply the concept of mole to solve for quantities in chemical reactions.
  • Apply the concepts of reversible reactions to explain chemical equilibrium.
  • Apply gas laws to describe the behavior of gases. Set up and solve gas law problems.
  • Solve various solution problems including solubility, concentration, and dilution. Compare solution properties such as osmosis, dialysis, electrolytes, and non-electrolytes.
  • Identify common characteristics of acids and bases including names, strengths, reactions, ionization in aqueous solution, pH scale, and buffers. Calculate the pH of solutions and evaluate the effects of adding an acid/base to a buffer system.
  • Compare and contrast the structure and properties, apply the IUPAC naming system, identify functional groups, and draw structural formulas for organic compounds.
  • Demonstrate proper and safe laboratory techniques, record observations, collect and analyze data, and form conclusion by performing both qualitative and quantitative experiments that support lecture topics.
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  • Perform calculations, set up and solve problems using conversion factors.
Conservation Biology BIOL 25
  • Differentiate between biosphere reserves, national parks, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands, national forest lands, and national wildlife refuges in terms of management philosophies and objectives.
  • Apply principles of the design of nature reserves to the Mt. SAC Wildlife Sanctuary.
  • Compare and contrast similarities and differences between laws that apply to national parks and laws that apply to multiple use public lands.
  • Apply current theories of genetics to illustrate problems with inbreeding and small population sizes.
  • Determine, from sample sets of data, the relationship between habitat island size and the degree of isolation on extinction rates.
  • Analyze the significance of biodiversity to ecological function.
  • Describe the relationship between the illegal trade in the wool of the Tibetan antelope and the illegal trade in tiger parts from India used for traditional Chinese medicine.
  • Integrate principles of ecology to explain relationships between habitat loss and extinction.
  • Participate in a group project that requires verbal presentation of a topic related to natural resource conservation.
Earth Science GEOL 8
  • Students will be able to describe the geologic, meteorologic, oceanographic, and astronomic processes that affect the Earth today.
  • Students will be able to synthesize inter-relationships between geologic, meteorologic, oceanographic and astronomic processes.
  • Students will be able to analyze global plate tectonics and its influence on the formation and occurrence of minerals, rocks, earthquakes and volcanoes, continents and oceans, and their physical features.
  • Students will be able to describe and classify essential minerals and rocks that compose the Earth's crust.
  • Analyze atmospheric circulation patterns, their influence on ocean circulation (surface currents, waves, upwellings, etc.), and the physical and chemical factors affecting local and regional weather and climate.
  • Students will be able to describe the origin and composition of Earth's atmosphere and how physical and chemical differences between air masses create clouds, precipitation, lightning and thunder, hurricanes, and tornadoes.
  • Students will be able to describe the origin and nature of the solar system (planets, moons, asteroids, meteoroids, comets) and other astronomic features (stars, galaxies) beyond Earth's solar system.
  • Students will be able to apply scientific terminology and methodology to analyze the natural processes affecting the Earth.
  • Students will be able to assess atmospheric circulation patterns, their influence on ocean circulation (surface currents, waves, upwellings, etc.), and the physical and chemical factors affecting local and regional weather and climate.
  • Plate tectonics
  • Types of rocks - Formation (Geol8)
  • Ocean Circulation
Earth Science - Honors GEOL 8H
  • Students will be able to synthesize inter-relationships between geologic, meteorologic, oceanographic and astronomic processes.
  • Students will be able to describe the geologic, meteorologic, oceanographic, and astronomic processes that affect the Earth today.
  • Students will be able to analyze global plate tectonics and its influence on the formation and occurrence of minerals, rocks, earthquakes and volcanoes, continents and oceans, and their physical features.
  • Students will be able to describe and classify essential minerals and rocks that compose the Earth's crust.
  • Students will be able to describe the origin and composition of Earth's atmosphere and how physical and chemical differences between air masses create clouds, precipitation, lightning and thunder, hurricanes, and tornadoes.
  • Students will be able to describe the origin and nature of the solar system (planets, moons, asteroids, meteoroids, comets) and other astronomic features (stars, galaxies) beyond Earth's solar system.
  • Analyze atmospheric circulation patterns, their influence on ocean circulation (surface currents, waves, upwellings, etc.), and the physical and chemical factors affecting local and regional weather and climate.
  • Students will be able to apply scientific terminology and methodology to analyze the natural processes affecting the Earth.
  • Students will be able to evaluate contemporary scientific issues and relate these to Earth's physical environment and processes.
Earth Science Laboratory GEOL 8L
  • Students will be able to apply the scientific method in analyzing Earth's processes.
  • Students will be able to interpret information portrayed on graphs, tables, and maps.
  • Students will be able to classify and identify essential minerals and rocks that compose the Earth's crust.
  • Students will be able to describe the steps and results of a scientific investigation.
  • Students will be able to utilize appropriate methods and tools for data collection in the Earth Sciences.
  • Students will be able to interpret spatial data in the Earth Sciences.
  • Students will be able to apply simple mathematical formulas in describing the velocity of seismic waves, locating an earthquake epicenter, calculating rates of motion of tectonic plates, and determining physical characteristics of ocean waves.
  • (1) SLO: The student will be able to correctly identify the mineral quartz. (2) SLO: The student will be able to determine distance using a topographic map. (3) SLO: The student will be able to calculate the velocity of a wave. (4) SLO: The student will be able to apply principles of relative dating to a hypothetical rock outcrop. A dike intrudes a sandstone. Which of the units is younger? (5) SLO: The student will be able to list the planets in the Solar System.
Ecology and Field Biology BIOL 3
  • Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to show the relevance of biology on their daily lives.
  • Students will be able to explain the concept of natural selection through ecological examples of comparative adaptations.
  • Students will be able to integrate principles of ecology to explain relationships within the biosphere and man's impact on the planet.
  • Students will be able to use dichotomous keys in identification of plant and animal species.
  • Students will be able to examine current ecological applications (i.e. sharing of neighborhoods by people and predatory species, effectiveness of the endangered species act, fragmentation of wildlife habitat, etc.).
  • Students will be able to diagram biogeochemical cycles and their relationship to environmental problems such as acid rain and global warming.
  • Students will be able to apply scientific theories and concerns (e.g. human population growth).
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast environmental topics such as ozone depletion vs. global warming, various animal mating systems, various foraging strategies, etc.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate various field techniques such as insect collection/ mounting, plant pressing, vegetation line transects, etc.
  • Students will be able to identify various local habitat types and their associated organisms, including amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals and plants.
Elementary Statistics Math 110
  • Determine the appropriate statistical methods by data type and number of populations or treatments.
  • Utilize statistical techniques with a variety of applications that pertain to business, the social, natural and physical sciences.
  • Students will be able to determine descriptive statistics from a sample
  • Students will be able to use sample statistics to develop a confidence interval for population parameters
  • Using sample statistics from one or more samples, students will be able to test a claim made about a population parameter.
  • Using bivariate data, students will be able to determine whether a significant linear correlation exists between two variables and determine the equation of the regression line.
  • Math 110 students will feel comfortable in their math class.
  • Math 110 students will demonstrate the thinking skill of accurate self-assessment.
  • Math 110 students will feel that mathematics is a beneficial part of their education.
  • Math 110 students will feel they have the resources necessary for their success.
  • Math 110 students will demonstrate the ability and willingness to take the steps necessary to succeed in their math class.
  • Define basic statistical terms and notation.
  • Describe the proper methods of sampling.
  • Describe the distributions of quantitative data in terms of center, shape, and spread.
  • Infer from observational and experimental studies.
  • Explain the basic concepts of probability theory and calculate probabilities.
  • Employ the principles of inferential statistics in estimation and hypothesis testing.
  • Utilize computer technology in statistical analyses.
Elementary Statistics -Honors Math 110H
  • Students will be able to determine descriptive statistics from a sample.
  • Students will be able to use sample statistics to develop a confidence interval for population parameters
  • Using sample statistics from one or more samples, students will be able to test a claim made about a population parameter
  • Using bivariate data, students will be able to determine whether a significant linear correlation exists between two variables and determine the equation of the regression line.
  • Math 110H students will feel comfortable in their math class.
  • Math 110H students will demonstrate the thinking skill of accurate self-assessment.
  • Math 110H students will feel that mathematics is a beneficial part of their education.
  • Math 110H students will feel they have the resources necessary for their success.
  • Math 110H students will demonstrate the ability and willingness to take the steps necessary to succeed in their math class.
  • Define basic statistical terms and notation.
  • Describe the proper methods of sampling.
  • Describe the distributions of quantitative data in terms of center, shape, and spread.
  • Infer from observational and experimental studies.
  • Explain the basic concepts of probability theory and calculate probabilities.
  • Determine the appropriate statistical methods by data type and number of populations or treatments.
  • Employ the principles of inferential statistics in estimation and hypothesis testing.
  • Utilize statistical techniques with a variety of applications that pertain to business, the social, natural and physical sciences.
  • Utilize computer technology in statistical analyses.
  • Demonstrate ability to combine appropriate data gathering techniques and ability to express statistical conclusions in formal writing to complete a large, semester-long project.
Elements of Physical Geography GEOG 1
  • Apply geographical methodology in the interpretation of spatial relationships involving distance, area, and direction on the earth's surface.
  • Examine the physical forces and processes which operate within the natural environment.
  • Students will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Recognize and identify how physical processes differ from place to place on the globe.
  • Define geography as an integrative discipline using examples of the Earth’s four spheres.
  • Describe common patterns of temperature and temperature inversions, high and low pressure, ocean and land winds, global winds, rain and desert patterns.
  • Compare and correlate the Earth’s major climates and biomes.
  • Locate major physical features of Earth on a series of world maps.
  • Distinguish between internal, mountain-building processes and external, landform-shaping processes.
Elements of Physical geography - Honors GEOG 1H
  • Examine the physical forces and processes which operate within the natural environment.
  • Recognize and identify how human and physical processes differ from place to place.
  • Apply geographical methodology in the interpretation of spatial relationships involving distance, area and direction on the Earth’s surface.
  • Define geography as an integrative discipline using examples of the Earth’s four spheres.
  • Describe common patterns of temperature and temperature inversions, high and low pressure, ocean and land winds, global winds, rain and desert patterns.
  • Compare and correlate the Earth’s major climates and biomes.
  • Locate major physical features of Earth on a series of world maps.
  • Distinguish between internal, mountain-building processes and external, landform-shaping processes.
Energy Science PHSC 3
  • Students will be able to explain how understanding the relationship between fossils fuel use and climate change relates to real life.
  • Students can identify the particular heat transfer mechanisms at play in the design of a solar water heating collector.
  • Students can explain the science behind global warming, and can explain the relationship between the use of fossil fuels and climate change.
  • Explain the pivotal role energy production and consumption play in maintaining the standard of living in a modern, technological society.
  • Explain how an electrical generator produces electricity, and how energy from a variety of sources is transformed into electrical energy.
  • Calculate the power generated by a given volume flow of water falling through a known distance through a hydroelectric generator of known efficiency.
  • Describe the processes underlying nuclear power generation, and be able to calculate the theoretical energy yielded from both fission and fusion reactions.
  • Apply basic heat transfer processes to explain the design of solar thermal collectors and systems.
  • Calculate the efficiency of an energy-transfer processes.
  • Analyze the technical, social, and economic factors driving our present energy production and distribution systems.
  • Describe the challenges that must be surmounted for alternative energy production to become fully integrated into the modern energy mix.
Engineering Physics PHYS 4A
  • Physics 4A students will be able to calculate the moment of inertia of a typical continuous body.
  • Students will be able to apply the material from the course to real life situations.
  • Students will be able to design an experiment to find the rotational inertia of an object.
  • Students will be able to propagate uncertainty.
  • Students will analytically predict the period of a physical pendulum, then design an experiment to measure the period.
Environmental Geology GEOL 9
  • EXAMINE DATA TO CALCULATE, INTERPRET AND PREDICT THE EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTALLY IMPORTANT GEOLOGIC PROCESSES See att doc
  • Study the sketch to analyze ground water quality. See att doc
  • Students will be able to describe the causes and results of geologic processes and their consequences to humans
Environmental Politics POLI 10
  • Students should be able to define sustainability taking account of social, economic, and environmental indicators.
  • Students should be able to identify and compare competing models of sustainable political economy.
Ethics PHIL 12
  • Students will be able to analyze major philosophical schools of thought, including Virtue Ethics, Deontological Ethics, and Utilitarianism. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to apply moral reasoning to contemporary ethical issues and moral problems. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to analyze primary texts in ethics. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to analyze the ideas of the major moral philosophers. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will identify philosophers (such as Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche, Sartre) and their ethical systems.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast various ethical systems (including Deontological, Teleological, Virtue Ethics).
  • Students completing an assignment in Ethics will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their ethics coursework.
Ethics - Honors PHIL 12H
  • Students will be able to analyze major philosophical schools of thought, including Virtue Ethics, Deontological Ethics, and Utilitarianism. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to apply moral reasoning to contemporary ethical issues and moral problems. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to analyze primary texts in ethics. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to analyze the ideas of the major moral philosophers. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to identify both culture and its influence on human expression.
  • Students will be able to identify the different Ethical Systems (Deontological, Teleological, Virtue Ethics)
  • Students will identify knowledge of Philosophers and their Ethical systems
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students will identify philosophers (such as Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche, Sartre) and their ethical systems.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast various ethical systems (including Deontological, Teleological, Virtue Ethics).
General Biology - GE BIOL 1
  • Students will be able to analyze data and construct a graph of their results in a scientifically appropriate manner.
  • Students' developmental learning will be addressed through tailored instruction using clicker technology such that students who are taught in courses using clicker technology will have a greater ability to solve metric problems.
  • Students' developmental learning will be addressed through tailored instruction using clicker technology such that students who are taught in courses using clicker technology will have greater abilities to understand new terminology through recognizing the meanings of prefixes, suffixes and word roots.
  • An advisory prereq of READ 100 has been added to Bio 1 course outline. It is currently in the queue for review by Ed Design.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Classify the molecules of living systems and apply basic principles of chemistry to their interaction.
  • Relate cell structure and physiology.
  • Compare and contrast the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in terms of energy transformation in cells.
  • Evaluate how life forms duplicate, maintain control, and exhibit hereditary patterns.
  • Summarize the various types of evidence used to examine evolutionary principles.
  • Assess how population and community dynamics are affected by ecological interactions.
  • Describe how the systems of the human body interact to maintain homeostasis.
  • Explain why evolution is the most all-encompassing scientific explanation for the history of life and the similarities in biochemistry and physiological processes among living things.
  • Can students answer general questions about community and population ecology and natural selection after completing a related activity in lab?
General Chemistry I CHEM 50
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of solution chemistry such as calculating molarity, making dilutions, and performing stoichiometric calculations.
  • Chem. 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of oxidation-reduction (redox) chemistry such as calculating oxidation numbers, identifying a redox reaction, finding oxidizing and reducing agents, and recognizing oxidation and reduction half-reactions of a redox reaction.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of oxidation-reduction concepts, such as: a. Determining oxidation numbers b. Identifying redox reactions c. Determining the oxidizing and reducing agents in a chemical reaction d. Classifying half-reactions as oxidation or reduction
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of solution chemistry such as: a. calculating molarity b. making dilutions c. performing stoichiometric calculations.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives. This assessment deals with dilutions.
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of solution chemistry such as: a. calculating molarity b. making dilutions c. performing stoichiometric calculations.
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of stoichiometric principles, such as: a. Mole-to-mole conversions b. Mole-to-mass conversions c. Mass-to-mass conversions d. Identifying limiting reactant e. Calculating the theoretical yield f. Calculating the amount of excess reactant
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of oxidation-reduction concepts, such as: a. Determining oxidation numbers b. Identifying redox reactions c. Determining the oxidizing and reducing agents in a chemical reaction d. Classifying half-reactions as oxidation or reduction
General Chemistry I - Honors CHEM 50H
  • Chem 50H students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of solution chemistry such as calculating molarity, making dilutions, and performing stoichiometric calculations.
  • Chem 50H students will be able to; a. predict a compound?s water solubility, b. predict a compound?s water reaction and electrolyte classification, c. predict single and double replacement reaction products including, neutralization, gas formation and, d. identify the net ionic equation for a reaction
  • Chem 50H students will be able to record measurements from common laboratory devices to the proper precision of each device.
  • Chemistry experiment and laboratory report: Determine the enthalpy of 2 different chemical reactions by preparing, experimenting, calculating, and reporting chemical results properly, using critical thinking in offering suggestions on how to improve results in further experimentation.
  • Chem 50H students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of stoichiometric principles, such as: a. Mole-to-mole conversions b. Mole-to-mass conversions c. Mass-to-mass conversions d. Identifying limiting reactant e. Calculating the theoretical yield f. Calculating the amount of excess reactant
General Physics PHYS 2AG
  • Students will be able to find the minimum coefficient of friction for a particular equilibrium situation.
  • Students will be able to correctly write the equation of motion to describe a system involving both translation and rotation.
  • Students will be able to experimentally analyze a hanging spring – mass system.
  • Students will be able to analyze a system with two masses, massive pulley, incline and friction.
  • Students will be able to express the velocity of an object in x and y components and magnitude with angle.
  • Students will be able to apply conservation of momentum to solve a problem.
  • students will correctly choose axes perpendicular and parallel to acceleration (not necessarily the surface)
  • Physics 2AG students will be able to draw a correct rigid body diagram for a typical rigid body problem.
  • Students should be able to measure the acceleration of a falling body.
  • Students will be able to apply the material from the course to real life situations.
Geography of California GEOG 30
  • Analyze the relationship between humans and the environment of California.
  • Recognize and evaluate how human and physical processes differ from place to place and analyze the distributional and locational relationship of things in the state of California.
  • Describe the physical processes that shape the natural environments of California.
  • Explain patterns of urban development in the state and distinguish current trends in urban development in California.
  • Explain the origins and development of agriculture and industry in California.
  • Analyze the influence of varying cultural and ethnic groups in the shaping of the cultural landscapes of California.
  • Analyze the use of natural resources in the state, particularly the role of water in the development of both the economic and social landscape of California.
  • Identify and evaluate how human and physical processes differ from place to place and be able to analyze the distributional and locational relationship of things in the state of California.
Geography of California - Honors GEOG 30H
  • Analyze the relationship between humans and the environment of California.
  • Recognize and evaluate how human and physical processes differ from place to place and analyze the distributional and locational relationship of things in the state of California.
  • Describe the physical processes that shape the natural environments of California.
  • Explain patterns of urban development in the state and distinguish current trends in urban development in California.
  • Explain the origins and development of agriculture and industry in California.
  • Analyze the influence of varying cultural and ethnic groups in the shaping of the cultural landscapes of California.
  • Analyze the use of natural resources in the state, particularly the role of water in the development of both the economic and social landscape of California.
  • Identify and evaluate how human and physical processes differ from place to place and be able to analyze the distributional and locational relationship of things in the state of California.
Human Geography GEOG 2
  • Describe the tools and theories used in geographic research.
  • Evaluate the relationship of humans and the environment.
  • Analyze the spatial variation of humans and their activities around the world.
  • Describe the scope of the discipline of geography and the tools used by geographers to study human processes on the earth.
  • Analyze the spatial expression and cultural impacts of contemporary globalization.
  • Describe the distribution of humans globally and explain the tools used by geographers to evaluate human population change.
  • Synthesize theories of human migration to explain historical and contemporary patterns of human mobility.
  • Explain spatial variation of and describe patterns of cultural and social expression including language, religion, ethnicity, race, gender, sexuality, political processes, urbanization, development, agriculture, manufacturing and service economies.
  • Describe human impacts on the environment including impacts of the use of renewable and non-renewable energy resources.
Human Geography - Honors GEOG 2H
  • Analyze the spatial variation of humans and their activities around the world.
  • Evaluate the relationship between humans and the environment.
  • Describe the tools and theories used in geographic research.
  • Describe the scope of the discipline of geography and the tools used by geographers to study human processes on the earth.
  • Analyze the spatial expression and cultural impacts of contemporary globalization.
  • Describe the distribution of humans globally and explain the tools used by geographers to evaluate human population change.
  • Synthesize theories of human migration to explain historical and contemporary patterns of human mobility.
  • Explain spatial variation of and describe patterns of cultural and social expression including language, religion, ethnicity, race, gender, sexuality, political processes, urbanization, development, agriculture, manufacturing and service economies.
  • Describe human impacts on the environment including impacts of the use of renewable and non-renewable energy resources.
Humans and the Environment BIOL 6
  • Students will develop intelligent activism in efforts to save the environment from deterioration.
  • Students will learn ecological principles, differentiate which ecological principles relate to specific ecological situations inspected in class and/or determine the relevance of environmental science to their daily lives
  • Appraise the complexities of the biological and environmental problems confronting humans.
  • Integrate ecological principles into everyday thought and apply them to decision- making.
  • Illustrate the basic ecological concept that everything living and non-living is interconnected.
  • Examine the differences between a frontier society and a sustainable earth society.
  • Contrast the laws of matter and thermodynamics and assess their connections to pollution.
  • Evaluate the concept of carrying capacity as it relates to the earth's resources and matter recycling systems.
  • Evaluate the "J"-shaped curves of increasing population, natural resource use and pollution with respect to their ability to disrupt the earth's life support system.
  • Evaluate the task of moving from simplistic, linear thinking to circular, cybernetic thinking that is harmonious with the ecological cycles that sustain us.
Humans and the Environment Laboratory BIOL 6L
  • Students will summarize and evaluate in writing critical ecological concerns regarding Mt. San Antonio College?s Wildlife Sanctuary
  • Students will learn ecological principles, differentiate which ecological principles relate to specific ecological situations inspected in lab and determine the relevance of environmental science to their daily lives
  • Select appropriate ecological principles from the textbook and integrate these principles in preparing written field notebooks.
  • Analyze the ecological principles presented in a variety of environmental articles.
  • Assess the potential problems of abused ecosystems and describe these problems.
  • Summarize the characteristics of California native plant communities.
  • Examine the process of energy production from waste resources.
  • Illustrate a flow chart of an urban water reclamation plant.
  • Analyze and evaluate the pros and cons of resource recycling.
  • Examine and evaluate the biological and social values of the Mt. San Antonio College Wildlife Sanctuary and other ecological reserves.
  • Summarize and evaluate critical ecological concerns along the Southern California coast.
  • Analyze information and describe the effects of nuclear weapons on the abiotic and biotic environment.
Introduction to General Chemistry CHEM 40
  • Chemistry 40 students will be able to interpret information and determine the sub-atomic particles and structure of atoms, isotopes and ions.
  • Chemistry 40 students will be able to apply the principles of stoichiometry to calculate the quantities of any component in a balanced chemical reaction equation.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • CHEM 40 students will be able to assign a molecular geometry of linear, bent, trigonal planar, trigonal pyramidal, or tetrahedral to a given molecule.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives. This assessment involved using household chemicals to identify counterfeit currency.
  • Chemistry 40 students will be able to apply the principles of stoichiometry to calculate the quantities of any component in a balanced chemical reaction equation.
  • Chemistry 40 students will be able to interpret information and determine the sub-atomic particles and structure of atoms, isotopes and ions.
  • Chemistry 40 students will be able to apply the principles of stoichiometry to calculate the quantities of any component in a balanced chemical reaction equation.
  • Students will be able to calculate the percent composition, molar masses, empirical and molecular formula of compounds from appropriate data.
  • This GEO assessment was based on the topic of the Household Chemicals experiment and the following questions were selected: In the Household Chemicals experiment, you observed one of the reactions between iodine and starch. The counterfeit banknote detection pen is a device used to by businesses to detect fake bills. The pen uses iodine-based ink to detect authenticity. Keep in mind that all US dollar bills are printed on paper made out of cotton fibers which do not contain starch while counterfeit bills are usually printed on paper containing some starch. In your own words (in five sentences or less) describe what would happen when ink from a counterfeit banknote detection pen writes on real United States bills versus a counterfeit bill. Please describe what kind of observation you would expect to witness. Would you be able to detect a counterfeit banknote?
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems GEOG 10 (VOC)
  • Perform simple spatial data analysis using appropriate software.
  • Apply principles of geographic data display to GIS problems.
  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate the results of GIS analysis through appropriate maps, documents and web pages.
  • Manipulate geographic data and the fundamentals of geographic data structures
  • Describe the fundamentals of cartography and the importance of map projections in constructing effective maps.
  • Construct simple spatial databases.
  • Analyze case studies of geographic problems and the procedures used to solve them.
  • Perform simple spatial data analysis using appropriate software.
  • Apply principles of geographic data display to GIS problems.
  • Communicate the results of GIS analysis through appropriate maps, documents and web pages.
  • Construct and maintain computer GIS files.
  • Use desktop GIS software.
  • Perform simple spatial data analysis using appropriate software.
  • Assess procedures necessary for spatial problem solving through the implementation of a method or tool.
  • Explore GIS career opportunities in a discipline specific field.
Introduction to Oceanography OCEA 10
  • Students will be able to describe how atmospheric circulation influences ocean circulation (surface currents, waves, upwelling, etc.); explain how physical and chemical factors of the ocean affect weather and climate.
  • Students will be able to provide examples of ways in which modern knowledge of the ocean was achieved through use of the scientific method.
  • Students will be able to apply scientific terms and the scientific method in analyzing ocean processes and the results of those processes.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the human impact on the ocean, especially in coastal areas and in relation to global climate change
  • Students will be able to summarize the geologic time scale, and apply it to the age of the Earth and ocean.
  • Student will be able to interpret / apply the effect of oceanographic processes.
  • Course embedded short answer questions.
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  • Students will be able to describe distinctive properties of the water molecule and show how these properties relate to the physical and chemical properties of seawater.
  • Students will be able to describe how atmospheric circulation influences ocean circulation.
  • Students will be able to explain how physical and chemical factors of the ocean affect global and local weather and climate in the past, present and future.
Introduction to Oceanography - Honors OCEA 10H
  • Students will be able to explain how volcanic eruptions, weathering, erosion, sedimentation, and the motion of tectonic plates are responsible for the origin and character of Earth's ocean.
  • Students will be able to provide examples of ways in which modern knowledge of the ocean was achieved through use of the scientific method.
  • Students will be able to describe how atmospheric circulation influences ocean circulation.
  • Students will be able to explain how physical and chemical factors of the ocean affect global and local weather and climate in the past, present and future.
  • Students will be able to apply scientific terms and the scientific method in analyzing ocean processes and the results of those processes.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the human impact on the ocean, especially in coastal areas and in relation to global climate change. 8. Identify and explain current developments in oceanography and their scientific significance.
  • Student will be able to interpret / apply the effect of oceanographic processes.
  • Course embedded short answer questions.
  • Students will be able to describe distinctive properties of the water molecule, and show how those properties relate to the physical and chemical properties of seawater.
Introduction to Oceanography Laboratory OCEA 10L
  • Students will be able to describe the steps involved in obtaining results in a scientific investigation.
  • Students will be able to collect and analyze ocean salinity, temperature, water depth, and pH data.
  • Students will be able to apply simple mathematical formulas and tools to determine rate of motion of tectonic plates, physical characteristics of ocean waves (e.g. velocity), bathymetry, and chemical characteristics of seawater.
  • Students will be able to interpret information displayed in graphs, tables, charts, and maps.
  • Students will be able to apply the scientific method in analyzing oceanographic data and interpreting ocean processes.
  • (1) SLO: The student will be able to calculate the velocity of tectonic plates given appropriate geophysical data. (2) SLO: The student will be able to explain the origin of lithogenous and biogenous sediment. (3) SLO: The student will be able to calculate the velocity of a wave. (4) SLO: The student will be able to determine ocean floor physiography using a bathymetric map. (5) SLO: The student will be able to analyze ocean salinity data.Generally, which locations exhibit the highest surface salinities?
  • Students will be able to analyze and interpret oceanographic data and interpreting ocean processes such as those responsible for differences in salinity, temperature, density, and changing climate.
Marine Biology BIOL 20
  • Students will be able to distinguish organisms that belong to class Chondrichthyes (fishes with a cartilaginous skeleton) form organisms that belong to class Osteichthyes (fishes with a bony skeleton).
  • Students will be able to describe two major differences between vertebrate and invertebrate marine organisms.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily live
  • Students will be able to differentiate between the major phyla of marine organisms.
  • Students will be able to explain factors that influence winds, currents and tides.
  • Students will be able to identify dominant invertebrates and vertebrates associated with the southern California coast.
  • Students will be able to summarize ecological principles associated with marine ecosystems.
  • Students will be able to explain the process of plate tectonics and its significance in marine environments.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the biological and political factors that are associated with overfishing.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the geological, physical, and chemical aspects of the marine environment and explain how marine organisms adapt to each aspect.
  • Students will be able to analyze the limiting factors of oceanic provinces.
Marine Biology - Laboratory BIOL 21
  • Students will demonstrate an ability to recognize chordgrass, pickleweed, and salt grass and describe the elevational distribution of these plants in a salt marsh.
  • Students will be able to identify 5 different organisms found in the intertidal zone of southern California.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Students will be able to differentiate between the major phyla of marine organisms based on anatomical differences discovered in laboratory dissections.
  • Students will be able to identify dominant invertebrates and vertebrates of the intertidal regions in a field situation by observing differences in distribution at different elevations above sea level.
  • Students will be able to summarize ecological principles associated with marine ecosystems.
  • Students will be able to analyze external and internal anatomy of marine organisms and describe differences in structure between various classes of marine organisms within a particular phylum.
  • Students will be able to relate anatomical structure to life style of various marine organisms, and analyze the significance of the structure and functions of organ systems to the mode of life in the marine environment.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the biological and physical aspects of the marine environment, and explain adaptations of marine organisms to each aspect.
Physical Geography Laboratory GEOG 1L
  • Interpret maps.
  • Construct maps using cartographic principles.
  • Evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Construct and interpret maps using cartographic principles.
  • Apply principles of earth-sun relationships to concepts of time, seasonal variations in solar energy receipt and overall climatic patterns on earth.
  • Perform functions of temperature and pressure change using lapse rates.
  • Relate the distribution of vegetation to biomes and soil types.
  • Analyze landform features through an understanding of tectonic processes as well as exogenic processes such as erosion and deposition.
Physical Geography Laboratory - Honors GEOG 1LH
  • Interpret maps.
  • Construct maps using cartographic principles.
  • Students will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Construct and interpret maps using cartographic principles.
  • Apply principles of earth-sun relationships to concepts of time, seasonal variations in solar energy receipt and overall climatic patterns on earth.
  • Perform functions of temperature and pressure change using lapse rates.
  • Relate the distribution of vegetation to biomes and soil types.
  • Analyze landform features through an understanding of tectonic processes as well as exogenic processes such as erosion and deposition.
Physical Geology GEOL 1
  • Students will be able to apply scientific thinking and scientific method to analyze geologic problems, and the causes and effects of geologic processes.
  • Students will be able to analyze deep time as it relates to the physical and chemical evolution of Earth over time.
  • Students will be able to use simple tools and techniques for field and lab identification of common minerals and rocks.
  • Students will be able to analyze how tectonics influences the formation and occurrence of minerals, rocks, earthquakes, volcanoes, oceans, continents, and landscapes.
  • Students will be able to analyze patterns and trends in observable data from a natural system, and form conclusions based on those patterns and trends.
  • Develop SLOs for Geol1 to be tested during Spring 09
Physical Science PHSC 9
  • Students will be able to describe the methods of energy transfer.
  • Students will be able to describe macroscopic observations and properties in terms of a microscopic (atomic) model.
  • Students will be able to describe the role of each component in a simple electric circuit.
  • Students will be able to accurately take and record measurements of a variety of physical quantities in lab.
  • Students will be able to identify the difference between and atom, molecule, and compound.
  • Students will be able to use Newton's laws to find the acceleration of an object.
  • Students will be able to apply the material from the course to real life situations.
  • Students will be able to write a balanced chemical equation for a double replacement reaction.
  • Students will identify which material has the greatest specific heat capacity.
Physics PHYS 1
  • Physics 1 students will be able to make measurements with optical instruments.
  • Students will be able to construct and make current and voltage measurements on parallel and series circuits.
  • Students will be able to use physics principles to explain how a loudspeaker converts an alternating electrical input into sound
  • Students will be able to apply a concept from the class to a real-life situation and give a reasonable solution.
  • 70% of the students should be able to apply some concept from the class to a real-life situation and give a reasonable answer
Plant Structures, Functions, and Diversity BTNY 3
  • Students will use the Scientific Method for a plant growth project to develop an understanding for how science works.
  • Students will learn a variety of values of botanical organisms inspected in during class and determine the relevance of Botany to their daily lives
  • Identify cells and tissues in stems, leaves and roots.
  • Compare and contrast the anatomical and morphological differences between stems, leaves and roots.
  • Distinguish modifications of stems, leaves and roots with respect to various environmental conditions related to water and food.
  • Evaluate various theories dealing with uptake of water and food and associated transport pathways in vascular plants.
  • Examine, monitor and analyze the growth and development of plants from seed to seed and relate deficiencies in nutrients to growth changes.
  • Summarize the characteristics of plant communities and biomes.
  • Examine the major lines of evolution of plants and the phylogenetic relationships from bacteria to angiosperms, including the work of Charles Darwin and natural selection.
  • Illustrate the ecological concept that every living and non-living thing is interconnected, with emphasis on biotic as well as abiotic factors such as soil and exposure to sun/wind.
  • Compare and contrast the reproductive structures of bacteria, algae, fungi, bryophytes, lower vascular plants, ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms.
  • Discuss the importance of biodiversity and conservation.
  • Value plants, fungi, algae, and the natural world.
Political Science POLI 1
  • Marshall empirical data to support a political science theory.
  • Differentiate among changes in the American constitutional government over time.
  • Identify constitutional amendments, which have expanded the right to vote.
  • Differentiate powers delegated to the U.S. from those reserved to the states.
  • Evaluate the role of political parties, interest groups, elections and the mass media in the American political system with an emphasis on the state of California and its relations to the national government.
  • Evaluate the role of Congress, the presidency, the courts and their interaction with state and local governments.
  • Analyze policy areas such as foreign and economic policy, civil rights and civil liberties, environmental and educational policies in order to predict or evaluate the consequences of various policy alternatives.
  • Differentiate powers delegated to the U.S. from those reserved to the states.
  • Identify constitutional amendments which have expanded the right to vote.
Political Science - Honors POLI 1H
  • Students completing Political Science 1 will be able to marshall empirical data to support a theory.
  • Students will be able to differentiate among changes in the American constitutional government over time.
Precalculus Mathematics Math 160
  • Students will be able to analyze a variety of functions.
  • Students will be able to solve different types of trigonometric equations.
  • Math students feel they have the resources necessary for their success.
  • Students will feel that mathematics is a beneficial part of their education
  • Graph functions using translations and reflections.
  • Determine the domains of functions.
  • Operate with functions.
  • Find the inverse of functions
  • Use linear and quadratic functions to solve application problems.
  • Solve for the complex roots of polynomial functions.
  • Analyze polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric equations.
  • Solve polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric equations.
  • Operate with vectors, including the dot product; use vectors to solve application problems.
  • Find the partial fraction decomposition of rational expressions.
  • Graph conic sections; recognize or derive their properties, and write their equations.
  • Solve and graph systems of nonlinear equations.
  • Analyze arithmetic and geometric sequences.
  • Use the binomial theorem.
Principles of Cultural Anthropology ANTH 5
  • Students will be able to recognize the immense scope of the multi-faceted discipline of anthropology and explain the relationships between its basic areas of inquiry: physical anthropology, cultural anthropology, linguistics and archaeology.
  • Students will be able to assess the historical development of anthropology as a Western academic discipline, giving particular attention to the significant contributions and perspectives of women, minority and non-Western cultural anthropologists.
  • Students will be able to examine the basic conceptual framework which structures the anthropological study of humanity, identifying the crucial distinctions between ethnocentrism and the practice of cultural relativism.
  • Students will be able to analyze the key methodological practices of cultural anthropology, with its major focus on pursuing ethnographic research through fieldwork.
  • Students will be able to relate how the processes in any cultural system operate by analyzing the integrated, synergistic nature of all such systems.
  • Students will be able to recognize the diversity of human cultures by contrasting comparative ethnographic information from a significant variety of world societies.
  • Students will be able to critically evaluate the dynamics of culture change (both voluntary and involuntary), and apply this knowledge to understanding the complexities of culturally heterogeneous societies.
  • Students will be able to analyze how anthropological knowledge and insights can be applied to current societal issues, and then be extrapolated to an analytic evaluation of humanity's future.
Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics BUSC 1A
  • Students completing BUSC 1A - Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics will correctly know the use of monetary policy and make comments on the monetary policy being used by the FED.
  • Students completing BUSC 1A - Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics will correctly know the use of fiscal policy and will be able to comment on the fiscal policy used by the government.
  • Students completing BUSC 1A - Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics will know Fiscal Policy, various types of Fiscal Policies, and the tools available to the federal government to use Fiscal Policy. The students will also know the difference between an expansionary and a contractionary fiscal policy.
  • Students completing BUSC 1A - Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics will know the monetary policy and the tools available to the Fed to use a certain type of monetary policy. The students will know the difference between an expansionary monetary policy and a contractionary monetary policy.
  • Students completing BUSC 1A - Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics will be able to discuss current fiscal policy of the federal government and will be able to form their opinion.
  • The students were asked to write a report on the use of fiscal policy used during Reagan administration. They were asked to discuss the 1981 Economic Recovery Act (ERA) and its effect on the economic activity during that period. More than 80% of the students were able to explain the fiscal policy and 1981 ERA effects on the economy with a clear understanding of the fiscal policy. (2017-18) Students were asked to write a summary report of 1981 Economic Recovery Act and compare it with Tax Reform of 2017. More than 80% of the students were able to highlight the similarities between two tax reforms, corporate income tax rates cuts and personal income tax rates cuts. They were able explain the expected impact in these tax rates cuts on unemployment rates in the economy. They were able to relate the recent news of bonuses given to employees as a result of corporate income tax rate cuts and got more than 80% score.
Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics - Honors BUSC 1AH
  • Students completing BUSC 1AH - Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics - Honors will correctly know the use of monetary policy and will be able to comment on the monetary policy used by the FED.
  • Students completing BUSC 1AH - Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics - Honors will correctly know the use of fiscal policy and will be able to comment on the fiscal policy being used by the government.
  • Students completing BUSC 1AH - Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics - Honors will know Fiscal Policy, various types of Fiscal Policies, and the tools available to the federal government to use Fiscal Policy. The students will also know the difference between an expansionary and a contractionary fiscal policy.
  • Students completing BUSC 1AH - Principles of Economics - Macroeconomics - Honors will know the monetary policy and the tools available to the Fed to use a certain type of monetary policy. The students will know the difference between an expansionary monetary policy and a contractionary monetary policy.
Principles of Economics - Microeconomics BUSC 1B
  • Students were asked to determine the merits of price-quantity determination in the market economy of the Unites States.
  • Students completing BUSC 1B - Principles of Economics - Microeconomics will correctly know consumer's behavior to maximize their utility in allocating scarce resources to satisfy their infinite wants.
  • Students completing BUSC 1B - Principles of Economics - Microeconomics will be able to choose quantities of different commodities having different price tags by spending limited amount of money to maximize satisfaction
  • Students completing BUSC 1B - Principles of Economics - Microeconomics will use producer's behavior to determine price of the product they produce under various market situations to maximize profit
  • Students were asked to discuss the reason for not giving welfare recipients their welfare benefits in cash rather than in-kind.
  • Students should be able to distinguish between public and private goods. Students should also be able to explain why private market fails to provide public goods.
  • Students should be able explain externalities and distinguish between external costs and external benefits.
Principles of Economics -Microeconomics - Honors BUSC 1BH
  • Students completing BUSC 1BH - Principles of Economics - Microeconomics - Honors will know to allocate scarce resources on various commodities to maximize satisfaction
  • Students completing BUSC 1BH - Principles of Economics - Microeconomics - Honors will use producer's behavior to determine price of the product they produce under various market situations to maximize profit
  • Students completing BUSC 1BH - Principles of Economics - Microeconomics - Honors will correctly know the consumers' behavior to maximize their utility by allocating scarce resources.
  • Students completing BUSC 1BH - Principles of Economics - Microeconomics - Honors will correctly know the producers' behavior to maximize their profit by allocating scarce resources.
  • Students should be able to distinguish between public goods and private goods. Students should be able to explain why private market fails to provide public goods.
  • Students were given a research paper to discuss and analyze "Coase Theorem" with respect to market failure and government intervention in the presence of externalities. They were asked to use examples to make their point. 100% of the student were able to discuss "Coase Theorem" properly citing some other research studies. All students got over 85% score in this paper.
Sociology SOC 2
  • Students will be able to understand and demonstrate the analysis of how controversial public issues arise in contemporary American society and the interplay between race, class, gender, sexuality and other social groups.
  • Students will be able to identify and analyze how sociological principles and concepts are applied in the understanding of social problems.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
Sociology - Honors SOC 2H
  • Students will be able to identify and analyze how sociological principles and concepts are applied in the understanding of social problems.
  • Students will be able to understand and demonstrate the analysis of how controversial public issues arise in contemporary American society and the interplay between race, class, gender, sexuality and other social groups.
  • Students will demonstrate an thorough understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will thoroughly analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior
  • Students will know major concepts of social problems.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
Special Projects in Biology BIOL 99A
  • Deliver an oral presentation with appropriate visual aids showing the results and conclusions of the project and experiences obtained
  • Write a paper demonstrating understanding of the research project or activity
  • Design a project, research paper, or experiment.
  • Create a proposal for the project, research paper, or experiment.
  • Evaluate information from a minimum of five sources (primary literature or other sources approved by the instructor) that relate to the project.
  • Apply ethical standards to research and/or other projects involving animal or human subjects.
  • Implement or complete the project, research paper, or experiment.
  • Integrate information from various sources, including initial information obtained in development of the project, in a collegiate-level research paper or project report.
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences PSYC 10
  • Perform and evaluate descriptive (e.g., mean, median, mode, variance, standard deviation) and inferential (e.g., Pearson correlation, t tests, z test, and one-way analysis of variance) statistics.
  • Using SPSS software, correctly input data, analyze data, and interpret output for descriptive statistics, t tests, correlation, and one-way analysis of variance.
  • Define and distinguish basic statistical terms and notation including scales of measurement.
  • Chart and interpret simple and cumulative frequency distributions.
  • Distinguish the difference between sample and population distributions and analyze the role played by the Central Limit Theorem.
  • Compute and describe the effects of various measures of central tendency and variability.
  • Describe and explain the normal curve including how z-scores are used and calculated.
  • Describe and interpret statistical error, effect size and power.
  • Formulate and test research hypotheses through the use of various inferential statistical procedures: t-tests, ANOVA, chi-square.
  • Compute and interpret descriptive statistics including correlation and regression.
  • Conduct and interpret statistical analyses using statistical software.
Weather and Atmospheric Environment Laboratory METO 3L
  • Students will be able to comprehend common weather phenomena.
  • Students will be able to Analyze the socio-economic impact of weather and climate change.
  • Students will be able to assess current weather conditions and explain the processes that created these conditions.
  • Students will be able to use electronic and analog equipment in weather data collection.
  • Students will be able to interpret and analyze weather data.
  • Students will be able to predict/forecast weather patterns based on trends in available data.
  • 1) Using a sling psychrometer determine the relative humidity and dew point inside the class and outside the building. 2) Using the temperature data provided and the saturation mixing ratio table, calculate relative humidity. 3) On the meteogram identify when the cold front and/or warm front passed each given location. 4) Calculate the noon sun angle for the dates and locations listed. 5) Using the data provided on the map, identify/dram the locations of the warm and/or cold fronts, the dry line (if present), and general wind directions.
Weather and the Atmospheric Environment METO 3
  • Students will be able to comprehend common weather phenomena.
  • Students will be able to describe and explain current weather events and the processes that created these conditions.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in problem solving skills as they relate to meteorology.
  • Students will be able to interpret and analyze various weather conditions.
  • Students will be able to analyze basic weather trends based on current weather data.
  • Students will be able to Analyze the socio-economic impact of weather and climate change.
  • Student will be able to analyze the map and evaluate meteorologic data
  • 5 multiple choice questions to asses comprehension of common weather phenomena.
  • 11 weather map questions to asses students' ability to analyze basic weather trends based on weather data/map.
World Regional Geography GEOG 5
  • Evaluate the geographic situation, problems and prospects for each world region.
  • Explain the geographic tools used in regional analysis.
  • Analyze the spatial variation of human activities and physical processes in distinctive world regions.
  • Define the concept of region in geographic analysis.
  • Identify the location of the world’s countries, major urban centers, bodies of water, and other landform features.
  • Explain patterns of physical processes in distinctive world regions including climate and landform evolution.
  • Explain patterns of human processes in distinctive world regions including demographics, migration, language, religion, ethnicity, political processes, development and economic activities.
  • Describe the physical, social, economic, political and cultural relationships between distinctive world regions.
  • Evaluate the primary causes of deforestation in Southeast Asia.
  • Analyze the impacts of colonialism in Sub-Saharan Africa.
  • Analyze the relationship between social, political and/or economic institutions and human behavior.