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Student Learning Outcomes

Discipline: Degree: AS - Audio Arts - S0434
Course Name Course Number Objectives
Acoustics for Audio Production MUSA 110
  • Students will be able to calculate a variety of acoustic phenomena such as wavelength, frequency, amplitude, reverberant time, and transmission loss.
  • Students will be able to use acoustic principles to make creative and technical decisions related to audio production.
  • Students will be able to analyze spaces and apply techniques for managing the acoustic properties of those spaces.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of psychoacoustic responses in humans and be able to account for these responses in audio productions.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate how sound is captured and the ability to control both wanted and unwanted sounds acoustically.
Audio Capstone MUSA 250
  • Students will be able to describe the concepts, history, and current trends of producing.
  • Students will be able to critically analyze existing productions from creative and technical perspectives.
  • Students will be able to oversee and manage a complex audio project.
  • Students will be able to apply leadership and communication skills to lead a group of artists and technicians.
  • Students will be able to apply advanced creative and technical techniques to multi-track audio productions.
  • Students will be able to conceptualize and deliver complex audio productions for a specified purpose.
Audio for Multimedia MUSA 210
  • Students will be able to describe the history of sound for multimedia.
  • Students will be able to identify key developments and contributions to the field of sound for multimedia.
  • Students will be able to critically analyze soundtracks, scores, and sound for multimedia.
  • Students will be able to edit and synchronize audio and visual media using computer workstations.
  • Students will be able to design and edit musical and nonmusical sounds for a variety of visual media.
  • Students will be able to collaborate with artists and technicians from a variety media fields to produce multimedia recordings.
Audio Recording MUSA 150
  • Students will be able to describe the principles of a recording system including signal flow, microphones, signal processing, digital audio, and monitoring.
  • Students will be able to understand and demonstrate proper signal flow and connections between recording components.
  • Students will be able to determine proper microphone selection and placement for a given audio source.
  • Students will be able to operate the hardware, software, and equipment in a modern audio recording system.
  • Students will be able to produce high fidelity audio recordings for a variety of applications.
Beginning Radio Production R-TV 11A
  • Students will be able to correctly identify and state the use of the major pieces of equipment found in a radio studio.
  • Students will be able to set a proper microphone level suitable to create a broadcast-quality recording.
  • Identify equipment needed for operation of a studio.
  • Differentiate various editing effects of voice, sound and music in both tape-based and digital technologies.
  • Explain the components of an interview.
  • Combine voice, music and sound effects in the creation of a radio commercial suitable for airing.
  • Demonstrate proper maintenance of studio equipment.
Business of Audio Production MUSA 130
  • Students will be able to explain the components of contracts, production companies, mechanicals, composer agreements.
  • Students will be able to discuss the roles of marketing, promotion, advertisement, merchandising, and live performances.
  • Students will be able to describe the principles of copyright, publishing, licensing, and royalties as they relate to audio production.
  • Students will be able to describe the function and role of industry personnel and organizations.
  • Students will be able to describe emerging trends in the audio industry.
  • Students will be able to identify key players, organizations, and opportunities in the industry.
Electronic Music MUSA 120
  • Students will be able to explain and demonstrate MIDI and audio editing techniques.
  • Students will be able to describe the principles of digital audio workstations.
  • Students will be able to create prescribed sounds utilizing various synthesis and sampling techniques.
  • Students will be able to create compositions or live performances using a digital audio workstation.
  • Students will be able to apply effects processing appropriately for compositional effect.
  • Students will be able to complete a creative audio project from conceptualization to distribution.
Electronics Theory ELEC 50A (VOC)
  • As a consequence of significant program modification in which electronics math concepts will be covered in the ELEC 50A theory course, students in ELEC 50A will be able to numerically analyze a series-parallel circuit.
  • Students completing ELEC 50A will be able to make accurate readings of voltage, current, and resistance using analog and digital multimeters.
  • Define common terms and recognize symbols used in DC electronic circuits.
  • Explain circuit operation of various DC circuitry.
  • Analyze from problems various DC unknown quantities.
  • Analyze from schematics various DC unknown quantities.
  • Predict unknown electronic quantities before solving electronic formulas.
  • Measure and record electrical quantities.
  • Demonstrate proper use of test equipment
  • Troubleshoot various defects in DC circuitry.
  • Calculate unknown electrical quantities in DC circuits.
Electronics Theory ELEC 50B (VOC)
  • Students completing ELEC 50B will be able to employ polar and/or rectangular notation to determine the magnitude and phase shift of an unknown circuit parameter (voltage, current, impedance, and/or power).
  • Students will be able to accurately measure amplitude and time parameters of a periodic waveform displayed on the oscilloscope screen.
  • Define common terms and recognize symbols used in AC electronics. (MO)
  • Analyze operation of AC circuits. (MO)
  • Calculate unknown electrical quantities in AC circuits. (MO)
  • Measure and record AC electrical quantities. (MO)
  • Demonstrate the proper use of test equipment (oscilloscope, function generator, frequency counter) when measuring electrical quantities in a lab exercise. (MO)
  • Compare and contrast characteristics of series versus parallel AC circuits. (MO)
  • Evaluate the characteristics of frequency selective circuits. (MO)
Fundamentals of Audio Technology MUSA 100
  • Students will be able to demonstrate a conceptual and practical understanding of digital audio workstations including audio and MIDI sequencing.
  • Students will be able to explain and demonstrate the fundamentals of synthesis and sampling.
  • Students will be able to describe the properties and components of audio systems.
  • Students will be able to configure and operate simple analog and digital audio systems.
  • Students will be able to create basic audio clips using analog and digital audio systems.
  • Students will be able to describe the history of and current trends in audio technology.
  • Students will be able to explain and demonstrate the fundamentals of audio including waveforms, frequency, amplitude, and harmonics.
Introduction to Electronic Media R-TV 01
  • All RTV program students will have an increased awareness of skills required for full-time work in the entertainment industry.
  • All RTV program students will have an increased awareness of professionals in the entertainment industry.
  • Identify key developments in the history of major U.S. electronic media industries, especially their evolution as social, political, and economic forces in U.S. society.
  • Describe the technical evolution of electronic media.
  • Identify the principal means of economic and political support for different electronic media, and discuss their impact.
  • Analyze regulations of electronic media.
  • Define commonly-used electronic communication technology.
  • Identify the business structure and revenue streams for each medium.
Live Sound Engineering MUSA 160
  • Students will be able to describe the principles of a live sound system including signal flow, microphones, signal processing, and monitoring.
  • Students will be able to diagnose and troubleshoot common problems encountered in a live sound reinforcement environment.
  • Students will be able to understand the interaction of audio electronics and acoustics in various environments
  • Students will be able to engineer live performances in a variety of genres.
  • Students will be able to collaborate with other engineers and non-engineers to put on a live sound event.
Music Theory MUS 2
  • Students will know, by the number and type of accidentals, all 15 major keys and 15 minor keys.
  • MUS 2 students will be able to name the chord quality of all diatonic triads and seventh chords in both the major and minor modes.
  • Identify pitches and pitch registers when notated on the staff using G, F or C clefs, or when designated on the piano keyboard.
  • Calculate the duration of notes and rests.
  • Calculate the beat value, beat division, beat type and meter for any regular time signature.
  • Recognize and construct major scales, minor scales and their respective key signatures.
  • Memorize, recall and interpret the circle of fifths
  • Evaluate minor melodies for tonal problems and employ accidentals to correct these problems.
  • Recognize, calculate and construct intervals between pitches.
  • Calculate interval inversions.
  • Distinguish between consonant and dissonant intervals in music notation.
  • Recognize and distinguish the four types of contrapuntal motion.
  • Evaluate two-voice first species tonal counterpoint on the basis of its adherence to style rules and aesthetic guidelines
  • Identify and construct triads and seventh chords
  • Memorize and recall all diatonic triad and seventh chord qualities in major and minor.
  • Analyze diatonic music for harmony using Roman numerals and bass position figures when the non-chord tones have been omitted or identified for the student
  • Classify cadences by type
Musicianship - Ear Training and Sight Singing MUS 5A
  • MUS 5A students will be able to sing on sight a short diatonic melody mixing stepwise motion and occasional skips through the tonic harmony.
  • MUS 5A students will be able to transcribe a diatonic melody played four times at the piano. This melody may use stepwise motion only, except for skips through the tonic triad and skips between 're' and 'ti'.
  • Students will demonstrate, through dictation, an aural understanding of major-mode melodies making use of rhythmic divisions, stepwise motion and occasional leaps through adjacent tones of the tonic and dominant triads.
  • Using the moveable-do solfege system, sight sing diatonic melodies and patterns that incorporate stepwise motion and occasional leaps outlining the tonic, dominant and leading tone triads.
  • Using the moveable-do solfege system, sing from memory diatonic melodies, patterns and duets that incorporate stepwise motion and occasional leaps outlining the tonic, dominant and leading tone triads.
  • Perform at sight rhythm pieces in simple meters that incorporate divisions as small as one-quarter of a beat (e.g., sixteenths in 4/4).
  • Perform at sight rhythm pieces in compound meters that incorporate divisions as small as one-third of a beat (e.g., eighths in 6/8).
  • Demonstrate, in written and verbal response, aural recognition of major, natural minor, harmonic minor and melodic minor scales.
  • Demonstrate, in written and verbal response, aural recognition of interval size for melodically played diatonic note pairs less than or equal to the octave where the first note of each pair is tonic.
  • Demonstrate, in written and verbal response, aural recognition of interval quality for note pairs a second, third, sixth or seventh apart when played melodically.
  • Demonstrate, in written and verbal response, aural recognition of interval size for note pairs a perfect fourth, perfect fifth and perfect octave apart.
  • Demonstrate, in written and verbal response, aural recognition of major, minor, diminished and augmented triads.
  • Transcribe, in correct musical notation, simple meter rhythms incorporating quarter-beat divisions and compound meter rhythms incorporating triplet divisions.
  • Transcribe, in correct musical notation, diatonic major and minor melodies consisting of stepwise motion and leaps through the tonic, dominant and leading tone triads.
Small Business Management BUSM 66 (VOC)
  • I am able to describe business planning for small business
  • I am able to discuss the legal forms of business ownership
  • I am able to discuss the marketing research process
Songwriting MUSA 230
  • Students will be able to compose original songs and lyrics in specified genres.
  • Students will be able to analyze songs for genre, form, structure, groove, and lyrical elements.
  • Students will be able to perform original songs as a soloist or with an ensemble.
  • Students will be able to create lead sheets for original compositions.
  • Students will be able to collaborate with others to produce a recording of a song.
  • Students will be able to describe the history and development of songwriting.
Sound Design for Live Performance MUSA 220
  • Students will be able to critically analyze live sound performances from creative and technical perspectives.
  • Students will be able to use current technology to design and playback sound in live performance settings.
  • Students will be able to perform audio productions in front of an audience.
  • Students will be able to design sounds for non-musical live performances.
  • Students will be able to create new and unique sounds for a variety of live applications.
  • Students will be able to collaborate effectively with artists, performers, technicians, and organizers to produce audio for live events.
Stagecraft THTR 14
  • Students who complete THTR 14 will know basic terminology related to scenery construction and theatrical lighting.
  • Students who complete THTR 14 will demonstrate construction skills common to stage carpentry.
  • Students who complete THTR 14 will know basic terminology related to scenery construction and theatrical lighting.
  • Create scenic elements that demonstrate mastery of the tools and equipment necessary for scenery construction.
  • Research, analyze and evaluate the problems of design and lighting for main stage productions.
  • Develop practical experience in the technical concerns of mounting actual theatrical production.
  • Research, analyze and evaluate the design and lighting for the main stage production of the Theater Department.
  • Evaluate and critique solutions to design problems in oral and written form.
  • Know and practice key safety issues relating to shop and backstage work.
Studio Engineering MUSA 200
  • Students will be able to design and set up multi-track recording sessions in a studio.
  • Students will be able to engineer all technical components in studio recording and mixing sessions.
  • Students will be able to manage the workflow and division of labor in studio recording and mixing sessions.
  • Students will be able to use critical listening to make technical and creative decisions while recording and mixing.
  • Students will be able to serve in a variety of roles in a recording setting, including runner, assistant, lead, and mix engineer.
  • Students will be able to apply a wide range of signal processing to audio for desired effect.
  • Students will be able to capture, edit, and mix high fidelity multi-track audio productions.
Work Experience in Audio Arts MUSA 299
  • Students will be able to produce audio to the standards and direction of site supervisor.
  • Students will be able to examine and analyze roles in the organization.
  • Students will be able to explain the entry-level and advancement opportunities available in the chosen area of audio production.
  • Students will be able to identify skills needed to successfully operate as an individual or within a team to produce audio.
  • Students will be able to self-assess knowledge and skills gained though the work experience.