Ask Joe
Menu

Discipline

  • Results for SLO Disciplines>

Student Learning Outcomes

Discipline: Degree: AS-T - Geology - S0670
Course Name Course Number Objectives
Calculus and Analytic Geometry Math 180
  • Students can compute instantaneous rates of change in applications
  • Students can evaluate integrals of elementary functions using the method of substitution.
  • Students can differentiate algebraic and transcendental functions
  • Students can solve optimization problems.
  • Math students feel they have the resources necessary for their success.
  • Students will feel that mathematics is a beneficial part of their education
  • Represent functions verbally, algebraically, numerically and graphically. Construct mathematical models of physical phenomena. Graph functions with transformations. Use logarithmic and exponential functions in applications. Solve calculus problems using a computer algebra system.
  • Prove limits using properties of limits and solve problems involving the formal definition of the limits. Solve problems involving continuity of functions. Evaluate limits at infinity and represent these graphically. Use limits to find slopes of tangent lines, velocities, other rates of change and derivatives.
  • Compute first and higher order derivatives of polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric functions. Evaluate derivatives using the product, quotient and chain rules and implicit differentiation.
  • Apply derivatives to rates of change and related rates problems, linear approximations and differentials, increasing and decreasing functions, maximum and minimum values, inflections and concavity, graphing, optimization problems, and Newton's Method. Apply the Mean Value Theorem in example problems. Use L'Hospital's Rule to evaluate limits of indeterminate forms. Use a Computer Algebra Systems in applications of calculus.
  • Evaluate indefinite integrals and definite integrals using the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Evaluate integrals using the substitution rule and integration by parts.
Calculus and Analytic Geometry Math 181
  • Students can determine convergence of infinite series of various forms using various techniques.
  • Students can describe objects algebraically and geometrically in various 2- or 3-dimensional coordinate systems.
  • Students can integrate algebraic and transcendental function using a variety of techniques
  • Students can apply the definite integral to applications.
  • Math students feel they have the resources necessary for their success.
  • Students will feel that mathematics is a beneficial part of their education
  • Use definite integrals to calculate areas between curves, volumes - including solids of revolution, work, the mean value of functions, arc lengths, areas of surfaces of revolution, moments, centers of mass, and other physics applications.
  • Differentiate hyperbolic functions and integrate functions that result in hyperbolic forms.
  • Evaluate indefinite and definite integrals (proper and improper) using integration by parts, trigonometric identities and substitutions, partial fractions, tables, computer algebra systems, and numerical techniques.
  • Solve separable differential equations with applications.
  • Plot curves parametrically and in polar coordinates, using calculus to compute associated areas, arc-lengths, and slopes.
  • Test for convergence for sequences and series using the integral, comparison, alternating series, ratio, and root tests.
  • Determine representations of functions as power series including Taylor and Maclaurin series.
  • Use power series in applications.
General Chemistry I CHEM 50
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of solution chemistry such as calculating molarity, making dilutions, and performing stoichiometric calculations.
  • Chem. 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of oxidation-reduction (redox) chemistry such as calculating oxidation numbers, identifying a redox reaction, finding oxidizing and reducing agents, and recognizing oxidation and reduction half-reactions of a redox reaction.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of oxidation-reduction concepts, such as: a. Determining oxidation numbers b. Identifying redox reactions c. Determining the oxidizing and reducing agents in a chemical reaction d. Classifying half-reactions as oxidation or reduction
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of solution chemistry such as: a. calculating molarity b. making dilutions c. performing stoichiometric calculations.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives. This assessment deals with dilutions.
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of solution chemistry such as: a. calculating molarity b. making dilutions c. performing stoichiometric calculations.
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of stoichiometric principles, such as: a. Mole-to-mole conversions b. Mole-to-mass conversions c. Mass-to-mass conversions d. Identifying limiting reactant e. Calculating the theoretical yield f. Calculating the amount of excess reactant
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of oxidation-reduction concepts, such as: a. Determining oxidation numbers b. Identifying redox reactions c. Determining the oxidizing and reducing agents in a chemical reaction d. Classifying half-reactions as oxidation or reduction
General Chemistry I - Honors CHEM 50H
  • Chem 50H students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of solution chemistry such as calculating molarity, making dilutions, and performing stoichiometric calculations.
  • Chem 50H students will be able to; a. predict a compound?s water solubility, b. predict a compound?s water reaction and electrolyte classification, c. predict single and double replacement reaction products including, neutralization, gas formation and, d. identify the net ionic equation for a reaction
  • Chem 50H students will be able to record measurements from common laboratory devices to the proper precision of each device.
  • Chemistry experiment and laboratory report: Determine the enthalpy of 2 different chemical reactions by preparing, experimenting, calculating, and reporting chemical results properly, using critical thinking in offering suggestions on how to improve results in further experimentation.
  • Chem 50H students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of stoichiometric principles, such as: a. Mole-to-mole conversions b. Mole-to-mass conversions c. Mass-to-mass conversions d. Identifying limiting reactant e. Calculating the theoretical yield f. Calculating the amount of excess reactant
General Chemistry II CHEM 51
  • Chem 51 students will be able to; a. Examine and predict the common ion effect on an equilibrium b. Recognize buffer a solution c. Determine pH of a buffer solutions d. Determine pH of a buffer solution upon addition of a strong acid or base. e. Determine chemical quantities needed in order to prepare a buffer solution.
  • Chem 51 students will be able to determine the order, rate law, and rate constant of a chemical equation based on a. Initial rates vs concentration data and b. Graphical analysis of concentration vs time data
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Chem 51 students will be able to a. determine the equilibrium constant expression (Law of Mass Action) when given a balanced chemical equation b. relate the magnitude of the equilibrium constant to the general position of the equilibrium c. determine the value of the equilibrium constant when given concentrations of reactants and/or products and the equilibrium expression d. apply stoichiometric principles to determine concentrations of reactants and/or products (simple algebraic or quadratic equation method) when given initial conditions, the value of the equilibrium constant, and the equilibrium expression e. apply Le Chatelier's Principle to an equilibrium system to predict the shift in equilibrium position when reaction conditions of concentration, temperature, or volume are changed
  • Chem 51 students will be able to a. examine and predict the effect of common ions on an aqueous equilibrium system b. recognize a buffer solution c. determine pH of a buffer solution d. determine pH of a buffer solution upon addition of a strong acid or base e. determine Kb from a corresponding Ka or vice versa f. determine chemical quantities needed in order to prepare a buffer solution of given pH and acid or base concentration
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives. The Chem 51 GEO assessment question for Fall 2012 dealt with solubility equilibria and Le Chatelier?s Principle
  • SLO on Common Ion Effect and Solubility Product Constant (Ksp) focused on the following measureable objectives: 2. Write equilibrium expression for reversible chemical systems. Calculate the equilibrium position, value of the equilibrium constant, and concentrations of all components of the system. 3. Apply Le Chatelier's Principle to systems at equilibrium to predict responses to stresses on the systems. The questions focused on determination of solubility, understanding the concept of Ksp, and the effects of the common ion effect on solubility. Some of the questions related directly to experiences that they had in several lab experiments.
  • By using the concept of Le Chatelier’s Principle, students will be able to a. predict the effect that causes the reaction to shift toward products in a gas phase reaction initially at equilibrium. b. predict the correct effect of different stresses on a gas phase reaction at equilibrium c. predict the correct effect of adding a substance that reacts with a component in the equilibrium system of a slightly soluble salt that was used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment d. predict the correct effect (by color of solution) from adding common ion in the aqueous phase equilibrium system used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment e. predict the correct effect (by color of solution) from adding a substance that reacts with a component in the equilibrium system used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment. The questions focused on determining the direction of shift of a reaction upon adding a variety of stresses to a system at equilibrium. Some of the questions related directly to experiences that they had in several lab experiments
  • By using the concept of Le Chatelier’s Principle, students will be able to a. predict the effect that causes the reaction to shift toward products in a gas phase reaction initially at equilibrium. b. predict the correct effect of different stresses on a gas phase reaction at equilibrium c. predict the correct effect of adding a substance that reacts with a component in the equilibrium system of a slightly soluble salt that was used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment d. predict the correct effect (by color of solution) from adding common ion in the aqueous phase equilibrium system used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment e. predict the correct effect (by color of solution) from adding a substance that reacts with a component in the equilibrium system used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment. The questions focused on determining the direction of shift of a reaction upon adding a variety of stresses to a system at equilibrium. Some of the questions related directly to experiences that they had in several lab experiments.
  • Chem 51 students will be able to a. examine and predict the effect of common ions on an aqueous equilibrium system b. examine and predict the effect of common ions on an aqueous equilibrium system as applied to the Solubility Procudt Constant (Ksp) Experiment c. predicting degree of solubility based on solubility product constants d. calculating the value of the solubility of a solution containing a common ion The questions focused on determination of solubility, understanding the concept of Ksp, and the effects of the common ion effect on solubility. Some of the questions related directly to experiences that they had in several lab experiments.
  • Chem 51 students will be able to a. Define and identify a buffer solution b. Determine the pH of a buffer solution c. Predict the change in pH of a buffer solution upon addition of a strong acid or base d. Determine the chemical quantitates needed in order to prepare a buffer solution of given pH and acid or base concentration
  • Student will be able to understand kinetics
General Chemistry II - Honors CHEM 51H
  • Chem 51 students will be able to a. Define and identify a buffer solution b. Determine the pH of a buffer solution c. Predict the change in pH of a buffer solution upon addition of a strong acid or base d. Determine the chemical quantitates needed in order to prepare a buffer solution of given pH and acid or base concentration
Historical Geology GEOL 2
  • Students will be able to analyze causes and effects of Earth processes in the evolution of life and the Earth's crust using the scientific method and scientific thinking.
  • Students will be able to describe how global tectonics has influenced geography, climate, and evolution of life through time.
  • Students will be able to describe and categorize sedimentary rocks and construct geologic maps.
  • Students will be able to articulate the concept of deep geologic time using the record of rocks and fossils.
  • Students will be able to reconstruct paleogeographic conditions through analysis of biogeochemical data
Physical Geology GEOL 1
  • Students will be able to apply scientific thinking and scientific method to analyze geologic problems, and the causes and effects of geologic processes.
  • Students will be able to analyze deep time as it relates to the physical and chemical evolution of Earth over time.
  • Students will be able to use simple tools and techniques for field and lab identification of common minerals and rocks.
  • Students will be able to analyze how tectonics influences the formation and occurrence of minerals, rocks, earthquakes, volcanoes, oceans, continents, and landscapes.
  • Students will be able to analyze patterns and trends in observable data from a natural system, and form conclusions based on those patterns and trends.
  • Develop SLOs for Geol1 to be tested during Spring 09