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Mt. SAC Emergency Alert

Alert: Mt. SAC is transitioning online. CLASSES will resume online after March 28. Instructors will communicate next steps to students. OFFICES are shifting to remote services as well. Learn more about our COVID-19 response at www.mtsac.edu/health.

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Discipline

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Student Learning Outcomes

Discipline: Nursing Degree: AS - Licensed Vocational Nurse to RN - S1201
Course Name Course Number Objectives
Child Growth and Lifespan Development CHLD 10
  • Students completing CHLD 10 - Child Growth and Development will be able to summarize and compare theories of development.
  • Students completing CHLD 10 - Child Growth and Development will be able to describe typical development in the physical, cognitive, and social/emotional domains throughout the lifespan.
  • Students completing CHLD 10 - Child Growth and Development will be able to identify biological and environmental factors that influence development from conception through the end of life.
  • Students completing CHLD 10 - Child Growth and Development will be able to collect and analyze data on relationships, skills, and competencies at various ages throughout the life span..
  • Students completing CHLD 10 - Child Growth and Development will be able to analyze data from observations of a child's play focusing on its various developmental functions.
  • Students completing CHLD 10 - Child Growth and Development will be able to demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
Developmental Psychology PSYC 14
  • Apply major theories in developmental psychology. (changed from identify to apply - 7/3/13)
  • Evaluate the relative contributions of nature and nurture to human development.
  • Analyze the developmental changes that take place during the prenatal, infancy, early and middle childhood, adolescence, early adulthood, middle adulthood stages, and later adulthood, and death.
  • Analyze the attachment process and its impact on psychological development throughout the lifespan.
  • Analyze the stages of bereavement and death with an understanding of cultural differences.
  • Compare the major development theorists including Erikson, Piaget, Vygotsky, Ainsworth, Lorenz, Levinson, Watson, Skinner, Kohlberg, Gilligan, White and Freud.
  • Evaluate scientific research methods (longitudinal, cross-sectional, sequential, twin method) used in developmental psychology.
  • Evaluate the historical and current traditional approaches to the study of developmental psychology.
  • Evaluate the Nature versus Nurture Controversy as it applies to developmental psychology.
  • Evaluate the implication of cultural processes on the psychological development of the individual.
  • Students will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social institutions and human behavior.
Freshman Composition ENGL 1A
  • Students will write an essay in which they synthesize information from a variety of sources.
  • Students will apply MLA format for citing and documenting sources.
Human Anatomy ANAT 35
  • Students will be able to recognize and describe the fundamental classes of tissues and distinguish between tissue types within each class.
  • Students will be able to describe the structure of organs at the histological level.
  • Students will be able to locate and describe the major organs of the mammalian body.
  • Students will be able to review the organization of each organ system and describe and define its components.
  • Students will be able to sequence pathways of movement and flow in such organ systems as circulatory, nervous, reproductive, digestive and respiratory systems.
  • Students will be able to identify bone markings and their normal variations on human specimens.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate accurate dissection technique and identification of important muscles, viscera, blood vessels and nerves in the cat, and structures of the sheep brain, eye and heart.
  • Students will be able to master muscle anatomy and give the name location, origin and insertion of muscles.
  • Students will be able to master the anatomy of the Human Skeletal System including names of bones, whether a paired bone is from the left or right side of the body, and diagnostic features of bones.
  • After taking Anat 35 students can give the name location, origin and insertion of muscles.
Human Physiology ANAT 36
  • Determine the number of ATP produced in the complete aerobic respiration of either a triglyceride, a simple sugar, or any combination thereof.
  • Collect and analyze ECG data.
  • Explain the mechanisms of cellular, cardiopulmonary, neuromuscular, sensory, digestive, renal, and reproductive physiology, and the regulation of these mechanisms.
  • Describe key interactions between organ systems, including acid and base regulation, fluid balance, and metabolic regulation.
  • Apply tools of the scientific method including data acquisition (conventional and computerized), simple statistical analysis, and presentation of data to reporting of data collected in laboratory activities.
  • Make predictions and draw conclusions which demonstrate physiological principles of physical transport, bioenergetics, hemodynamics, cardiovascular and respiratory dynamics, digestive enzyme kinetics, and renal function.
  • Predict changes in normal physiological pathways that occur in common pathologies.
  • Predict the outcomes of laboratory exercises according to concepts, principles, and laws discussed in the course.
Introduction to Psychology PSYC 1A
  • Differentiate the major theoretical perspectives of psychology.
  • Demonstrate psychology is a science by explaining how psychology utilizes the scientific method.
  • Apply psychological principles to personal observations and / or experiences.
  • Identify the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, core empirical findings, and historic trends in psychology.
  • Compare and contrast major theoretical perspectives of psychology (e.g., psychoanalytic, behavioral, humanistic, etc.)
  • Apply concepts and theories from the following general domains: (a) biological bases of behavior and mental processes, (b) sensation and perception, (c) consciousness, (d) learning and memory, (e) cognition, intelligence, and language (f) lifespan development (g) motivation and emotion, (h) gender and sexuality, (i) stress and health, (j) social psychology, (k) personality, and (l) psychological disorders and approaches to treatment.
  • Apply psychological principles to personal experience.
  • Compare and contrast research methods in psychology, including advantages and disadvantages of each (e.g., observation, case study, survey, correlational method, experimental method).
  • Distinguish between scientific and non-scientific methods of understanding.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social institutions and human behavior.
Introductory Human Physiology ANAT 10B
  • Determine the number of ATP produced in the complete aerobic respiration of either a triglyceride, a simple sugar, or any combination thereof.
  • Analyze EKG data.
  • Acquire laboratory-generated data and perform statistical analyses within the framework of the scientific method.
  • Predict the outcome of laboratory exercises according to concepts, principles, and laws discussed in the course.
  • Evaluate case studies by applying physiological principles on a molecular, cellular, organ, and systems level.
  • Explain the mechanisms of cellular, cardiopulmonary, neuromuscular, sensory, digestive, renal, and reproductive physiology, and the regulation of these mechanisms.
  • Demonstrate the ability to describe key interactions between organ systems including acid/base regulation, fluid balance, and metabolic regulation.
  • Compare and contrast normal physiology and pathophysiology observed in specific disease states.
Introductory to Human Anatomy ANAT 10A
  • Identify and locate major bone markings on all human bones and determine which side of the body a bone belongs to.
  • Identify and describe structures of the eukaryotic cell.
  • Describe the functional classes of tissues, and distinguish between tissue subtypes.
  • Locate and describe the major organs of the human and cat.
  • Review the organs/structures in each organ system and describe the components of each.
  • Describe the structure of the major organs of the human body at the tissue level.
  • Sequence functional pathways in organ systems such as circulatory, nervous, digestive, respiratory, musculoskeletal, and reproductive systems.
  • Use anatomical regions and directional terms to describe positions and relative positions in the human body.
  • Identify body cavities and their contents.
  • Students' developmental learning will be addressed through tailored instruction using clicker technology such that students who are taught in courses using clicker technology will have a greater ability to solve metric problems.
  • Students' developmental learning will be addressed through tailored instruction using clicker technology such that students who are taught in courses using clicker technology will have greater abilities to understand new terminology through recognizing the meanings of prefixes, suffixes and word roots.
  • 75% of students will solve metric-metric and metric-English problems.
  • Students will understand 75% of the new terminology through recognizing the word roots, prefixes, and suffixes.
Leadership in Nursing NURS 9
  • Each student will demonstrate the ability to discuss, recognize and differentiate objectives of nursing leadership and management by week-6 of the course.
Maternity Nursing NURS 4
  • Perform a complete admission assessment of a newborn infant. (Lab- MO)
Medical-Surgical Nursing: Circulation and Oxygenation NURS 8
  • Course completers will successfully identify life threatening events in the cardiac patient.
  • Each student will demonstrate knowledge of the appropriate nursing intervention associated to the corresponding rhythm strip.
Medical-Surgical Nursing: Integration/Regulation NURS 10
  • Each student will demonstrate an appropriate neurological assessment by week-4 of the course.
  • Students will demonstrate effective geriatric patient education for a neurological / endocrine patient.
Medical-Surgical Nursing: Nutrition/Elimination/Surgical Asepsis NURS 7
  • Each student will successfully demonstrate insertion of an intravenous catheter
Microbiology MICR 22
  • Explain the basic features of every group of microorganisms.
  • Describe the physiology and genetic processes of microorganisms.
  • Apply physical and chemical methods of controlling microorganisms.
  • Explain the dynamics of host-parasite interaction.
  • Diagnose specific diseases on the basis of symptoms and laboratory test results.
  • Perform basic microbiology lab procedures using appropriate PPE required for this laboratory course.
  • Demonstrate safe handling and proper hazardous waste disposal procedures for microorganisms and chemicals used.
  • Analyze, using student’s own experimental design, effective hand washing.
  • Demonstrate how to properly use the compound light microscope, as well as know its parts, their functions, how to safely transport and clean it.
  • Perform aseptic transfer techniques and interpretations of laboratory results.
  • Students are able to demonstrate aseptic techniques that are appropriate for the allied health fields.
Pediatric Nursing NURS 6
  • Each student will be competent in administering medication to the pediatric patient using the milligram to kilogram formula.
Preceptorship in Nursing NURS 11
  • Students will successfully perform patient centered care safely and accurately to include medication administration, head to toe assessment, and nursing interventions .
Principles of Microbiology MICR 1
  • Be able to determine etiologic agent and identify disease given a series of original infectious diseases case studies.
  • Students will be able to describe the structures/functions of external and internal components of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
  • Students will be able to draw standard growth curves for bacterial cultures and explain factors affecting bacterial growth.
  • Students will be able to Describe characteristics of selected pathogens, and the diseases caused by each.
  • Students will be able to describe the role of genes, chromosomes, mutations and human manipulation in heredity of prokaryotic cells.
  • Students will be able to contrast the metabolic processes of fermentation and aerobic metabolism, noting cycles involved, energy production and end products.
  • Students will be able to outline the general characteristics of viruses, prions, and viroids.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the best method to control microbes in various settings (chemical, physical or chemotherapeutic agents).
  • Students will be able to describe the course of infectious diseases, including the interactions with host defenses.
  • Students will be able to identify the fundamental concepts of immunity, immunization, immune deficiencies and immunological testing.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate aseptic technique and safe handling of microbial cultures
  • Students will be able to prepare smears, perform staining procedures and record microscopic observations.
  • Students will be able to identify an unknown bacterial organism based on results of lab procedures performed and through a miniaturized multitest system; compare findings of these two methods.
  • Students will be able to evaluate physical, chemical and chemotherapeutic agents.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the level of contamination in water, milk, specific food products.
  • Students will be able to perform quantitative plating and turbidity measures to determine the number of bacteria present in a culture sample.
  • Students will be able to describe and accurately draw various microbes based on microscopic observations.
  • Students will be able to perform a molecular separation technique (gel electrophoresis) and identify a DNA source using DNA fingerprinting.
  • Students will be able to observe bacterial transformation by plasmid DNA and describe an acquired phenotypic trait of the transformed cells.
  • Students will be able to use an immunobiotechnological procedure (ELISA) to detect a positive HIV reaction in a simulation.
Psychiatric Nursing NURS 5
  • By week three of the course each student will complete a Full Psychiatric Assessment.
Public Speaking SPCH 1A
  • Students will feel more confident.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the reliability of information sources
  • Students will understand the need to adapt communication style to acknowledge the differences in others.
  • Students will utilize appropriate speech organization.
  • Students will deliver an organized verbal response to a prompt with little to no preparation time.
  • Students will be able to articulate an argument with reasoning and support.
  • Students will create full-sentence outlines using appropriate, credible research sources and attribution.
  • Students will speak extemporaneously (with minimal notes).
  • Students will be able to use electronic resources to conduct research.
  • Students will perform five speeches.
  • Students will evaluate the reliability of information sources.
  • Students will write formal speech outlines.
  • Students will be able to perform basic speech delivery skills
  • Students will critically evaluate public speeches.
  • Students will create and effectively utilize visual aids
  • Students will reduce communication apprehension.
  • Students will enjoy public speaking.