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Student Learning Outcomes

Discipline: Degree: AA - Liberal Arts Emphasis Kinesiology and Wellness - A8986
Course Name Course Number Objectives
Advanced First Aid/CPR/Emergency Response KIN 5
  • Students will take a written exam to qualify for an American Red Cross - First Responder/Emergency Response CPR and First Aid Card.
  • Students will be able to pass the skills tests, established by the American Red Cross, with the skill level needed to qualify for the First Responder, CPR for the Professional Rescuer ARC cards.
  • 80% of the students will meet the CPR standards which include Adult, Infant and Child CPR Techniques as required by the American Red Cross Certification.
  • Compare and contrast the difference between manual compressions?and using an AED.
  • Perform with competency, the techniques used for immobilization.
  • Identify and analyze the different body systems.
  • Recognize scenarios that require CPR and First Aid skills.
  • Assess the signs and symptoms of various life threatening?conditions and demonstrate the appropriate actions to provide?care.
  • Identify skills necessary for certification in American Red Cross Emergency Medical Response.
Biological Psychology PSYC 1B
  • Identify the major anatomical structures, and their functions, of the nervous system.
  • Identify the major structures and main sequence of events of neural chemical transmission.
  • Students will apply biopsychological principles/ findings to their own lives.
  • Identify the major structures of the brain from coronal, mid sagittal, and horizontal views.
  • Describe the effects of various types of brain damage and disease (i.e., strokes, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, etc.) upon the nervous system.
  • Describe the research on pre/post natal development of the brain and neuroplasticity.
  • Explain the role of natural selection in nervous system functioning
  • Explain the neural impulse in terms of the voltage and chemical changes that occur in the neuron.
  • Explain the process of synaptic transmission and the hypothesized effects of neurotransmitters on behavior.
  • Analyze the different methods of investigation of the nervous system.
  • Classify the different types of neurons and glial cells in the nervous system.
  • Evaluate the research evidence concerning the role that different brain areas play in the following behaviors and/or functions: perception, biological rhythms, motivation and emotion, sexual behaviors, response to stress, learning and memory, lateralization and languages.
  • Appraise the role of genetics in understanding behavior and/or nervous system functioning.
Career / Life Planning COUN 5
  • Students who complete Counseling 5 will be able to identify their personality type.
  • Students who complete Counseling 5 will have identified several careers based on their identified personal attributes.
  • Students who complete COUN 5 will feel more confident of their choice of major/career or have changed to a more appropriate major/career
  • Students who complete COUN 5 will be able to clearly identify pathways to transfer to four-year universities.
  • Students who complete COUN 5 will thoroughly evaluate Associate Degree and Certificate options if transfer is not their primary choice.
  • Students who complete Counseling 5 will feel confident in their ability to choose a major.
  • Students who complete Counseling 5 will feel more confident about their interviewing skills.
  • Students will identify at least one career/occupational field that they would like to pursue as a result of the completion of COUN 5.
  • Students completing an assignment in Area E courses will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being
Chemistry for Allied Health Majors CHEM 10
  • Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical bonding concepts such as writing the electron-dot (Lewis) structure, predicting molecular geometry, and determining whether a given bond is ionic, nonpolar covalent or polar-covalent.
  • Students enrolling in CHEM 10 are able to perform appropriate algebra skills.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of acid-base concepts such as predicting products of neutralization reaction, comparing relative acidity of solutions based on pH, and calculating the concentrations of hydronium ions, hydroxide ions, and pH of acidic and basic solutions.
  • Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical bonding concepts such as writing the electron-dot (Lewis) structure, predicting molecular geometry, and determining whether a given bond is ionic, nonpolar covalent or polar-covalent.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives. This GEO assessment was based on the topic of Reaction Rates
  • Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of acid-base concepts such as predicting products of neutralization reaction, comparing relative acidity of solutions based on pH, and calculating the concentrations of hydronium ions, hydroxide ions, and pH of acidic and basic solutions.
  • Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical bonding concepts such as writing the electron-dot (Lewis) structure, predicting molecular geometry, and determining whether a given bond is ionic, nonpolar covalent or polar-covalent.
  • Chem 10 student will be successful at defining a chemical reaction and identifying the observations that indicate a chemical reaction.
  • 1) Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of acid-base concepts such as comparing relative acidity of solutions based on pH 2) Chem 10 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of acid-base concepts such as calculating the concentrations of hydronium ions, hydroxide ions, and pH of acidic and basic solutions
  • Express measurements using correct significant figures. Perform calculations, set up and solve problems using conversion factors.
  • Analyze the structure of an atom, and write electron configurations for elements in the Periodic Table.
  • Differentiate types of radioactivity, contrast methods of medical applications, write nuclear equations and solve problems relating to half-lives of radioactive substances.
  • Identify the types of bonds, predict bond polarity, and write the names or formulas for inorganic compounds.
  • Compare and contrast the three states of matter and forms of energy. Evaluate energy profiles of chemical reactions and calculate the energy for changes of state.
  • Complete and balance various types of chemical equations including oxidation-reduction reactions. Apply the concept of mole to solve for quantities in chemical reactions.
  • Apply the concepts of reversible reactions to explain chemical equilibrium.
  • Apply gas laws to describe the behavior of gases. Set up and solve gas law problems.
  • Solve various solution problems including solubility, concentration, and dilution. Compare solution properties such as osmosis, dialysis, electrolytes, and non-electrolytes.
  • Identify common characteristics of acids and bases including names, strengths, reactions, ionization in aqueous solution, pH scale, and buffers. Calculate the pH of solutions and evaluate the effects of adding an acid/base to a buffer system.
  • Compare and contrast the structure and properties, apply the IUPAC naming system, identify functional groups, and draw structural formulas for organic compounds.
  • Demonstrate proper and safe laboratory techniques, record observations, collect and analyze data, and form conclusion by performing both qualitative and quantitative experiments that support lecture topics.
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  • Perform calculations, set up and solve problems using conversion factors.
College Success Strategies COUN 2
  • Students will be able to identify external and internal factors that influence academic success.
  • Students will be able to identify at least 2 study skill strategies important for success.
  • Students will be able to identify and explain 2 reasons for procrastination.
  • Students will be able to explain a new time management strategy.
  • Students will discuss two time management strategies learned from COUN 2
  • Students will be able to identify two success strategies and how they would help in achieving academic success.
Contemporary Health Issues BIOL 5
  • Students completing an assignment in Area E courses will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
  • Students will be able to identify patterns of disease and disability in the U.S.
  • Students will be able to describe the components of a behavior modification program.
  • Students will be able to examine the effects of stress on physical and mental health.
  • Students will be able to identify the benefits of prenatal care and testing.
  • Students will be able to describe risk reduction strategies for preventing sexually transmitted diseases.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the interaction between fitness and nutrition and chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer.
  • Students will be able to describe the effects of psychoactive drugs on multiple body systems.
  • Students will be able to identify risk factors for intentional and unintentional injuries.
  • Students will be able to synthesize the interaction of multiple environmental hazards.
  • Students will be able to analyze problems in health care delivery in the U.S.
  • Students will be able to compare and evaluate elements of a nutritionally healthy diet.
  • Students will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
Essentials of Nutrition NF 25
  • Students completing NF 25 - Essentials of Nutrition will be able to demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation of their current food choices related to increasing their lifelong personal wellbeing.
  • Students completing NF 25 - Essentials of Nutrition will be able to demonstrate mastery of course material by planning a diet that meets or exceeds standards of nutritional adequacy.
  • Students completing NF 25 – Introduction to Nutrition Science will utilize a computerized database to evaluate personal diet records.
First Aid and CPR KIN 3
  • Students will meet the CPR standards, which includes CPR, rescue breathing and obstructed airway, as required by the American Red Cross for certification of the Adult, Child and Infant population.
  • Students will learn and demonstrate skills necessary for controlling bleeding, immobilization techniques and care for sudden illnesses.
  • Develop a scenario for the identification, care and treatment of a sudden illness.
  • With a classmate demonstrate the proper technique of controlling severe bleeding.
  • Complete the study questions at the conclusion of each chapter.
  • Using the mannequin, perform the necessary one-person intervention for a rescue-breathing scenario.
Fitness for Living KIN 34
  • Examine the six dimensions of fitness and wellness.
  • Identify common treatment procedures for exercise related injuries.
  • Students will be able to define the 5 Components of Fitness and identify a benefit of each one.
  • Students completing an assignment in Area E courses will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
  • Read and evaluate food label
  • Students will be able to define and identify the Five Components of Health Related Fitness and their appropriate assessment tools for each.
  • Students will be able to read and evaluate a nutritional food label.
  • Develop personal fitness programs using the F.I.T.T. principles.
  • Describe safe and effective exercise programs
  • Identify common assessments for components of fitness.
  • Analyze current levels of stress and identify appropriate types of stress management and relaxation techniques.
  • Identify the relationship of exercise on disease prevention.
  • Compare nutritional habits with federal nutritional guidelines.
General Biology - GE BIOL 1
  • Students will be able to analyze data and construct a graph of their results in a scientifically appropriate manner.
  • Students' developmental learning will be addressed through tailored instruction using clicker technology such that students who are taught in courses using clicker technology will have a greater ability to solve metric problems.
  • Students' developmental learning will be addressed through tailored instruction using clicker technology such that students who are taught in courses using clicker technology will have greater abilities to understand new terminology through recognizing the meanings of prefixes, suffixes and word roots.
  • An advisory prereq of READ 100 has been added to Bio 1 course outline. It is currently in the queue for review by Ed Design.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Classify the molecules of living systems and apply basic principles of chemistry to their interaction.
  • Relate cell structure and physiology.
  • Compare and contrast the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in terms of energy transformation in cells.
  • Evaluate how life forms duplicate, maintain control, and exhibit hereditary patterns.
  • Summarize the various types of evidence used to examine evolutionary principles.
  • Assess how population and community dynamics are affected by ecological interactions.
  • Describe how the systems of the human body interact to maintain homeostasis.
  • Explain why evolution is the most all-encompassing scientific explanation for the history of life and the similarities in biochemistry and physiological processes among living things.
  • Can students answer general questions about community and population ecology and natural selection after completing a related activity in lab?
General Physics PHYS 2AG
  • Students will be able to find the minimum coefficient of friction for a particular equilibrium situation.
  • Students will be able to correctly write the equation of motion to describe a system involving both translation and rotation.
  • Students will be able to experimentally analyze a hanging spring – mass system.
  • Students will be able to analyze a system with two masses, massive pulley, incline and friction.
  • Students will be able to express the velocity of an object in x and y components and magnitude with angle.
  • Students will be able to apply conservation of momentum to solve a problem.
  • students will correctly choose axes perpendicular and parallel to acceleration (not necessarily the surface)
  • Physics 2AG students will be able to draw a correct rigid body diagram for a typical rigid body problem.
  • Students should be able to measure the acceleration of a falling body.
  • Students will be able to apply the material from the course to real life situations.
History and Appreciation of Dance DN-T 20
  • DN-T 20 (History and appreciation of Dance) students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the chronological overview of western theatrical dance from the Renaissance period to the present.
  • DN-T 20 (History and appreciation of Dance) students will gain an appreciation of dance as a performing art.
  • Identify a chronological overview of theatrical dance from renaissance court to present time.
  • Identify major artists of dance periods.
  • Analyze dance in film and live performance.
  • Compare and contrast classical and contemporary periods of theatrical dance.
  • Assess the cross-cultural influences that have shaped theatrical dance.
Human Anatomy ANAT 35
  • Students will be able to recognize and describe the fundamental classes of tissues and distinguish between tissue types within each class.
  • Students will be able to describe the structure of organs at the histological level.
  • Students will be able to locate and describe the major organs of the mammalian body.
  • Students will be able to review the organization of each organ system and describe and define its components.
  • Students will be able to sequence pathways of movement and flow in such organ systems as circulatory, nervous, reproductive, digestive and respiratory systems.
  • Students will be able to identify bone markings and their normal variations on human specimens.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate accurate dissection technique and identification of important muscles, viscera, blood vessels and nerves in the cat, and structures of the sheep brain, eye and heart.
  • Students will be able to master muscle anatomy and give the name location, origin and insertion of muscles.
  • Students will be able to master the anatomy of the Human Skeletal System including names of bones, whether a paired bone is from the left or right side of the body, and diagnostic features of bones.
  • After taking Anat 35 students can give the name location, origin and insertion of muscles.
Human Physiology ANAT 36
  • Determine the number of ATP produced in the complete aerobic respiration of either a triglyceride, a simple sugar, or any combination thereof.
  • Collect and analyze ECG data.
  • Explain the mechanisms of cellular, cardiopulmonary, neuromuscular, sensory, digestive, renal, and reproductive physiology, and the regulation of these mechanisms.
  • Describe key interactions between organ systems, including acid and base regulation, fluid balance, and metabolic regulation.
  • Apply tools of the scientific method including data acquisition (conventional and computerized), simple statistical analysis, and presentation of data to reporting of data collected in laboratory activities.
  • Make predictions and draw conclusions which demonstrate physiological principles of physical transport, bioenergetics, hemodynamics, cardiovascular and respiratory dynamics, digestive enzyme kinetics, and renal function.
  • Predict changes in normal physiological pathways that occur in common pathologies.
  • Predict the outcomes of laboratory exercises according to concepts, principles, and laws discussed in the course.
Human Reproduction, Development and Aging BIOL 13
  • Students will compare and evaluate opposing positions on a controversial issue in lifespan development.
  • Students completing an assignment in Area E courses will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
  • Students will be able to explain the major developmental theories and scientific methods used to study development.
  • Students will be able to describe male and female sexual anatomy and physiology, including sex hormones and their actions.
  • Students will be able to describe cell division, and the principles of genetics, with special emphasis on their impact on human development.
  • Students will be able to explain conception, embryological and fetal development, and the birth process, as well as problems that may arise in any of these stages.
  • Students will able to summarize the biophysical, cognitive, and psychosocial development of infants, toddlers, children, adolescents and adults, and factors that influence these developmental areas.
  • Students will be able to discuss the impact of death in our Western culture, and how we deal with dying, death, loss and bereavement.
Introduction to Care/Prevention of Activity/Sports-Related Injuries KIN 19
  • Students will be able to perform a basic injury evaluation.
  • Students will demonstrate proficient skill in the various tape and wrap techniques.
  • Understand the roles and responsibilities of the certified athletic trainer.
  • Demonstrate the knowledge of ankle injuries by participating in rehabilitation exercises and athletic taping.
  • Demonstrate the ability to assess lower leg injuries by watching and noting each others biomechanics during standing and walking.
  • Assess flexibility and understand injury predisposition.
  • Describe overhead throwing patterns after reviewing the text and video on proper throwing mechanics.
  • Analyze the involvement of the elbow during throwing and how it predisposes young athletes to injury.
  • Assess spine injury and observe the importance of preventing further injury during spine boarding.
  • Identify various Southern California weather conditions and how they impact physical activity and athletic health.
  • Apply therapeutic modalities and how they affect athletic injury treatment.
Introduction to Dance DN-T 18
  • DN-T 18 (Introduction to Dance) students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of various multicultural dance forms.
  • DN-T 18 (Introduction of Dance) students will gain an appreciation of dance as a performing art.
  • Identify basic dance forms.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of various dance forms.
  • Compare and contrast different dance forms through performance and written evaluation.
  • Understand criteria to critique dance performances.
  • Improve general physical condition through participation in the dance activities.
Introduction to General Chemistry CHEM 40
  • Chemistry 40 students will be able to interpret information and determine the sub-atomic particles and structure of atoms, isotopes and ions.
  • Chemistry 40 students will be able to apply the principles of stoichiometry to calculate the quantities of any component in a balanced chemical reaction equation.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • CHEM 40 students will be able to assign a molecular geometry of linear, bent, trigonal planar, trigonal pyramidal, or tetrahedral to a given molecule.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives. This assessment involved using household chemicals to identify counterfeit currency.
  • Chemistry 40 students will be able to apply the principles of stoichiometry to calculate the quantities of any component in a balanced chemical reaction equation.
  • Chemistry 40 students will be able to interpret information and determine the sub-atomic particles and structure of atoms, isotopes and ions.
  • Chemistry 40 students will be able to apply the principles of stoichiometry to calculate the quantities of any component in a balanced chemical reaction equation.
  • Students will be able to calculate the percent composition, molar masses, empirical and molecular formula of compounds from appropriate data.
  • This GEO assessment was based on the topic of the Household Chemicals experiment and the following questions were selected: In the Household Chemicals experiment, you observed one of the reactions between iodine and starch. The counterfeit banknote detection pen is a device used to by businesses to detect fake bills. The pen uses iodine-based ink to detect authenticity. Keep in mind that all US dollar bills are printed on paper made out of cotton fibers which do not contain starch while counterfeit bills are usually printed on paper containing some starch. In your own words (in five sentences or less) describe what would happen when ink from a counterfeit banknote detection pen writes on real United States bills versus a counterfeit bill. Please describe what kind of observation you would expect to witness. Would you be able to detect a counterfeit banknote?
Introduction to Human Services PSYC 17
  • Evaluate how the following factors affect services clients receive: culture, language, financial status, intellect, educational level, physical ability, mental health, age, gender, sexual orientation.
  • Achieve more clarity in one's own desire to pursue a career in Human Service.
  • Apply modalities to interacting and communicating with clients.
  • Differentiate models of human service delivery.
Introduction to Physical Education KIN 17
  • Students will describe the following areas in a presentation of their chosen career in the field of Kinesiology: 1.job description, 2. Job outlook, 3. Salary, 4. Education/certification requirement, 5. Areas of expertise, 6. Experience required, and 7. Positives/negatives of the job.
  • Students will be able to describe three regular job responsibilities of each of the following: Exercise physiologist, Philosopher, Historian, Sociologist, Psychologist, Biomechanist, Motor behaviorist.
  • Students will be able to list 15 of the successful teaching characteristics from John Wooden's pyramid of success.
  • Students will be able to teach a chosen skill.
  • Students will be able to list and define ten of the fifteen successful coaching characteristics from John Wooden’s Pyramid
  • Students will be able to teach their given skill in a three step teaching progression at a minimum score of 70%
  • Identify the basic concepts of kinesiology.
  • Investigate the scope and breadth of the field and the variety of career opportunities in kinesiology.
  • Describe the historical, ethical, and philosophical foundations of kinesiology.
  • Identify the pathways and requirements for career opportunities.
  • Identify the relationship between performance in the movement forms of sport, dance, and exercise and the conceptual foundations of the sub-disciplines.
  • Investigate current issues and problems in physical education and athletics
Introduction to Psychology - Honors PSYC 1AH
  • Be able to differentiate the major theoretical perspectives of psychology.
  • Explain how psychology utilizes the scientific method
  • Apply psychological principles to personal experiences.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social institutions and human behavior.
Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology PSYC 3
  • Compare and contrast the various research designs and describe their relative strengths and weaknesses.
  • Describe the process of answering psychological questions from a scientific perspective.
  • Identify the goals of science and the goals of research
  • Compare and contrast research designs used by psychologists
  • Determine appropriate statistical analyses for designs.
  • Describe and discuss statistical validity.
  • Perform original psychological research using American Psychological Association (APA) code of ethics
  • Use APA style correctly in writing empirically-based reports and literature reviews.
  • Perform literature searches and reviews using standard resources.
  • Evaluate published research.
Introductory Human Physiology ANAT 10B
  • Determine the number of ATP produced in the complete aerobic respiration of either a triglyceride, a simple sugar, or any combination thereof.
  • Analyze EKG data.
  • Acquire laboratory-generated data and perform statistical analyses within the framework of the scientific method.
  • Predict the outcome of laboratory exercises according to concepts, principles, and laws discussed in the course.
  • Evaluate case studies by applying physiological principles on a molecular, cellular, organ, and systems level.
  • Explain the mechanisms of cellular, cardiopulmonary, neuromuscular, sensory, digestive, renal, and reproductive physiology, and the regulation of these mechanisms.
  • Demonstrate the ability to describe key interactions between organ systems including acid/base regulation, fluid balance, and metabolic regulation.
  • Compare and contrast normal physiology and pathophysiology observed in specific disease states.
Introductory to Human Anatomy ANAT 10A
  • Identify and locate major bone markings on all human bones and determine which side of the body a bone belongs to.
  • Identify and describe structures of the eukaryotic cell.
  • Describe the functional classes of tissues, and distinguish between tissue subtypes.
  • Locate and describe the major organs of the human and cat.
  • Review the organs/structures in each organ system and describe the components of each.
  • Describe the structure of the major organs of the human body at the tissue level.
  • Sequence functional pathways in organ systems such as circulatory, nervous, digestive, respiratory, musculoskeletal, and reproductive systems.
  • Use anatomical regions and directional terms to describe positions and relative positions in the human body.
  • Identify body cavities and their contents.
  • Students' developmental learning will be addressed through tailored instruction using clicker technology such that students who are taught in courses using clicker technology will have a greater ability to solve metric problems.
  • Students' developmental learning will be addressed through tailored instruction using clicker technology such that students who are taught in courses using clicker technology will have greater abilities to understand new terminology through recognizing the meanings of prefixes, suffixes and word roots.
  • 75% of students will solve metric-metric and metric-English problems.
  • Students will understand 75% of the new terminology through recognizing the word roots, prefixes, and suffixes.
Microbiology MICR 22
  • Explain the basic features of every group of microorganisms.
  • Describe the physiology and genetic processes of microorganisms.
  • Apply physical and chemical methods of controlling microorganisms.
  • Explain the dynamics of host-parasite interaction.
  • Diagnose specific diseases on the basis of symptoms and laboratory test results.
  • Perform basic microbiology lab procedures using appropriate PPE required for this laboratory course.
  • Demonstrate safe handling and proper hazardous waste disposal procedures for microorganisms and chemicals used.
  • Analyze, using student’s own experimental design, effective hand washing.
  • Demonstrate how to properly use the compound light microscope, as well as know its parts, their functions, how to safely transport and clean it.
  • Perform aseptic transfer techniques and interpretations of laboratory results.
  • Students are able to demonstrate aseptic techniques that are appropriate for the allied health fields.
Nutrition for Personal Health and Wellness NF 10
  • Students completing NF 10 - Nutrition for Personal Health and Wellness will be able to analyze food labels for nutrient content and other pertinent information that will help in healthy food selection.
  • Students completing NF 10 - Nutrition for Personal Health and Wellness will be able to analyze food intake and compare to recommended goals.
  • Students completing NF 10 - Nutrition for Personal Health and Wellness will be able to evaluate fad diets and products.
  • Students completing NF 10 - Nutrition for Personal Health and Wellness will feel motivated and confident in their abilities to apply the information they learned in class to their lives.
Physics PHYS 1
  • Physics 1 students will be able to make measurements with optical instruments.
  • Students will be able to construct and make current and voltage measurements on parallel and series circuits.
  • Students will be able to use physics principles to explain how a loudspeaker converts an alternating electrical input into sound
  • Students will be able to apply a concept from the class to a real-life situation and give a reasonable solution.
  • 70% of the students should be able to apply some concept from the class to a real-life situation and give a reasonable answer
Principles of Microbiology MICR 1
  • Be able to determine etiologic agent and identify disease given a series of original infectious diseases case studies.
  • Students will be able to describe the structures/functions of external and internal components of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
  • Students will be able to draw standard growth curves for bacterial cultures and explain factors affecting bacterial growth.
  • Students will be able to Describe characteristics of selected pathogens, and the diseases caused by each.
  • Students will be able to describe the role of genes, chromosomes, mutations and human manipulation in heredity of prokaryotic cells.
  • Students will be able to contrast the metabolic processes of fermentation and aerobic metabolism, noting cycles involved, energy production and end products.
  • Students will be able to outline the general characteristics of viruses, prions, and viroids.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the best method to control microbes in various settings (chemical, physical or chemotherapeutic agents).
  • Students will be able to describe the course of infectious diseases, including the interactions with host defenses.
  • Students will be able to identify the fundamental concepts of immunity, immunization, immune deficiencies and immunological testing.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate aseptic technique and safe handling of microbial cultures
  • Students will be able to prepare smears, perform staining procedures and record microscopic observations.
  • Students will be able to identify an unknown bacterial organism based on results of lab procedures performed and through a miniaturized multitest system; compare findings of these two methods.
  • Students will be able to evaluate physical, chemical and chemotherapeutic agents.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the level of contamination in water, milk, specific food products.
  • Students will be able to perform quantitative plating and turbidity measures to determine the number of bacteria present in a culture sample.
  • Students will be able to describe and accurately draw various microbes based on microscopic observations.
  • Students will be able to perform a molecular separation technique (gel electrophoresis) and identify a DNA source using DNA fingerprinting.
  • Students will be able to observe bacterial transformation by plasmid DNA and describe an acquired phenotypic trait of the transformed cells.
  • Students will be able to use an immunobiotechnological procedure (ELISA) to detect a positive HIV reaction in a simulation.
Psychology for Effective Living PSYC 33
  • Understand the processes by which psychological factors influence physical health.
  • Students will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
  • Compare and contrast major theories of personality and apply them to daily life.
  • Analyze how attitudes, social perception, and social influence affect views of self and others.
  • Describe sources and moderators of stress in one's own life and evaluate healthy and unhealthy coping mechanisms.
  • Explain how psychological factors, nutrition, exercise, sleep and drug use influence physical and mental health
  • Distinguish various psychological disorders as described in the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual and the specific therapeutic techniques used to help people who demonstrate psychological disorders.
  • Demonstrate interpersonal communication skills and conflict resolution techniques.
  • Analyze ways gender and sexuality affect thinking and behavior.
  • Identify various aspects of interpersonal attraction such as the meaning of friendship, definitions of love, loneliness, and predictors of marital and relationship success.
  • Identify personal issues that relate to career planning and job satisfaction.
  • Demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing lifelong personal well-being.
  • Identify stressors in your own life and evaluate the effectiveness of your coping strategies. (replaces previous SLO #1)
  • Explain stressors in your own life and generate a list of effective and ineffective ways of coping.
Psychology of Sexuality PSYC 26
  • Identify and describe sexual and reproductive anatomy, physiology, and sexual responses.
  • Describe differences in sexual attitudes and behaviors based on diversity.
  • Demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing your lifelong personal well-being.
  • Describe historical and current research methods in studying human sexuality.
  • Describe dysfunctional and atypical sexual behaviors and therapy
  • Describe the sexual marketplace and discuss potentially controversial issues related to prostitution and pornography.
  • Describe sexuality from conception, pregnancy, and birth to childhood, adolescence, and adulthood.
  • Describe the implications of various types of sexual aggression and violence.
  • Explain various types of love, communication, and sexual behaviors in relationships.
  • Identify various structures of male and female sexual anatomy and discuss their functions in the physiology of human sexual responding.
  • Identify symptoms of various sexually transmitted diseases and discuss their prevalence, transmission, and treatment.
  • Analyze and evaluate different theories of gender and sexual orientation.
  • Compare and contrast various methods of contraception.
Sociology SOC 2
  • Students will be able to understand and demonstrate the analysis of how controversial public issues arise in contemporary American society and the interplay between race, class, gender, sexuality and other social groups.
  • Students will be able to identify and analyze how sociological principles and concepts are applied in the understanding of social problems.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
Sociology SOC 1
  • Students will identify and apply the main sociological theoretical frameworks to analyze social stratification based on race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups.
  • Students will apply sociological research to distinguish the interrelatedness of various social intuitions and the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will identify the role of culture and socialization in the development of one’s beliefs, opinions, and values.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will know major concepts of sociology.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
Sociology - Honors SOC 1H
  • Students will identify and apply the main sociological theoretical frameworks to analyze social stratification based on race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups.
  • Students will apply sociological research to distinguish the interrelatedness of various social intuitions and the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will thoroughly know the major concepts of General Sociology.
  • Students will demonstrate an thorough understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will thoroughly analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students will identify the role of culture and socialization in the development of one’s beliefs, opinions, and values.
Sociology - Honors SOC 2H
  • Students will be able to identify and analyze how sociological principles and concepts are applied in the understanding of social problems.
  • Students will be able to understand and demonstrate the analysis of how controversial public issues arise in contemporary American society and the interplay between race, class, gender, sexuality and other social groups.
  • Students will demonstrate an thorough understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will thoroughly analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior
  • Students will know major concepts of social problems.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
Sociology of Ethnic Relations SOC 20
  • Students will know major concepts of race and ethnicity.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will use sociological research concepts and theories to identify and analyze the social constructions of race and ethnicity, its interactions with different aspects of society, and its impact on the experiences of different racial/ethnic groups.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
  • Students will use sociological research concepts and theories to identify and analyze the social constructions of race and ethnicity, its interactions with different aspects of society, and its impact on the experiences of different racial/ethnic groups.
Sociology of Ethnic Relations - Honors SOC 20H
  • Students will know major concepts of the sociology of race and ethnic relations.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students will use sociological research concepts and theories to identify and analyze the social constructions of race and ethnicity, its interactions with different aspects of society, and its impact on the experiences of different racial/ethnic groups.
Sports Officiating KIN 13
  • Describe the rules to the sports presented.
  • Students will be able to identify the four essential objectives of a sports official.
  • Students will be able to identify two responsibilities for each of the four sports officials objectives.
  • Students will be able to read and evaluate sport rule books and codes of conduct
  • Identify the rules, mechanics and techniques of the officiating role.
  • Identify the differences between an effective and an ineffective official.
  • Describe the financial components of officiating.
  • Evaluate the performance of officials.
  • Describe the legal responsibilities of a sports official.
Techniques of Fitness Testing KIN 39
  • Students will be able to define muscular strength.
  • Recall movement prep movements to ensure core activation.
  • Students will demonstrate knowledge of the importance and purpose(s) of performing fitness testing
  • Students will demonstrate knowledge of risk factors and thresholds for stratifying level of risk for fitness testing.
  • Use a health appraisal screening tool prior to exercise.
  • Identify positive coronary risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease.
  • Evaluate and stratify the health status of potential clients.
  • Explain the purpose of performing physical assessments on clients.
  • Identify the protocols for selected fitness tests
  • Administer test protocols properly and safely.
  • Apply components of fitness and develop fitness programs based on an individual’s tests results
Theory of Coaching KIN 44
  • Students will be able to identify and comprehend the ASEP (American Sports Education Program) coaching philosophy.
  • Students will be able to understand the concept of goal setting and how it relateds to coaching.
  • Compare and contrast coaching styles and philosophies.
  • List and apply coaching principles, rules and skills.
  • Discuss coaching theory and principle of training.
  • Develop coaching activity units and seasonal plans.
  • Demonstrate teaching component of sport skills.