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Student Learning Outcomes

Discipline: Degree: AA-T - Sociology
Course Name Course Number
Introduction to Race and Ethnicity SOC 20
  • Students will use sociological research concepts and theories to identify and analyze the social constructions of race and ethnicity, its interactions with different aspects of society, and its impact on the experiences of different racial\/ethnic groups.
Introduction to Race and Ethnicity - Honors SOC 20H
  • Students will use sociological research concepts and theories to identify and analyze the social constructions of race and ethnicity, its interactions with different aspects of society, and its impact on the experiences of different racial\/ethnic groups.
Asian American Communities SOC 36
  • Students will be able to describe with clarity a change in cultural attitudes over time.
  • Students will use sociological research concepts and theories to identify and analyze Asian American & Pacific Islander racial and ethnic identities and its interactions with different aspects of American society.
Child Development SOC 15
  • Students will be able to apply a sociological understanding of the various social and environmental forces that shape child development.
  • Students will be able to apply a sociological understanding physical growth and social, emotional, and cognitive development from conception to adolescence across all major concepts of child development.
Contemporary Social Problems SOC 2
  • Students will be able to understand and demonstrate the analysis of how controversial public issues arise in contemporary American society and the interplay between race, class, gender, sexuality and other social groups.
  • Students will be able to identify and analyze how sociological principles and concepts are applied in the understanding of social problems.
Contemporary Social Problems - Honors SOC 2H
  • Students will be able to understand and demonstrate the analysis of how controversial public issues arise in contemporary American society and the interplay between race, class, gender, sexuality and other social groups.
  • Students will be able to identify and analyze how sociological principles and concepts are applied in the understanding of social problems.
Critical Thinking PHIL 8
  • Students will learn to analyze informal fallacies.
  • Students will be able to distinguish inductive and deductive arguments.
  • Students will be able to evaluate arguments (strong\/weak, valid\/invalid).
  • Students will be able to apply problem-solving skills to their personal belief systems and social issues.
  • Students will be able to identify the premises\/reasons for supporting the conclusion within an argument.
Critical Thinking and Writing PHIL 9
  • Students will be able to distinguish inductive and deductive arguments.
  • Students will be able to develop a thesis statement that advances a clear argument.
  • Students will be able to evaluate arguments (strong\/weak, valid\/invalid).
  • Students will be able to identify the premises\/reasons for supporting the conclusion within an argument.
  • Students will demonstrate proficiency (precision, clarity, organization) in argumentative writing (with a minimum of 6,000 words for the semester), where positions are defended, and ideas are explored.
  • Students will learn to analyze informal fallacies.
Critical Thinking and Writing ENGL 1C
  • In conversation with multiple texts, whether assigned by the instructor or chosen by the student, students will write a formal argument.
  • Students will evaluate the soundness of arguments.
Critical Thinking and Writing - Honors PHIL 9H
  • Students will be able to distinguish inductive and deductive arguments.
  • Students will demonstrate proficiency (precision, clarity, organization) in argumentative writing (with a minimum of 6,000 words for the semester), where positions are defended, and ideas are explored.
  • Students will be able to identify the premises\/reasons for supporting the conclusion within an argument.
  • Students will learn to analyze informal fallacies.
  • Students will be able to develop a thesis statement that advances a clear argument.
  • Students will be able to evaluate arguments (strong\/weak, valid\/invalid).
Critical Thinking and Writing - Honors ENGL 1CH
  • In conversation with multiple texts, whether assigned by the instructor or chosen by the student, students will write a formal argument.
  • Students will evaluate the soundness of arguments.
Elementary Statistics Math 110
  • Using bivariate data, students will be able to determine whether a significant linear correlation exists between two variables and determine the equation of the regression line.
  • Using sample statistics from one or more samples, students will be able to test a claim made about a population parameter.
  • Students will be able to use sample statistics to develop a confidence interval for population parameters
  • Students will be able to determine descriptive statistics from a sample
  • Students will be able to use sample statistics to develop a confidence interval for population parameters. \n\nUsing sample statistics from one or more samples, students will be able to test a claim made about a population parameter.
Elementary Statistics -Honors Math 110H
  • Students will be able to use sample statistics to develop a confidence interval for population parameters
  • Students will be able to determine descriptive statistics from a sample.
  • Using bivariate data, students will be able to determine whether a significant linear correlation exists between two variables and determine the equation of the regression line.
  • Using sample statistics from one or more samples, students will be able to test a claim made about a population parameter
  • Students will be able to use sample statistics to develop a confidence interval for population parameters. \n\nUsing sample statistics from one or more samples, students will be able to test a claim made about a population parameter.
Human Geography GEOG 2
  • Analyze the spatial variation of humans and their activities around the world.
  • Evaluate the relationship of humans and the environment.
  • Describe the tools and theories used in geographic research.
  • Describe human impacts on the environment including impacts of the use of renewable and non-renewable energy resources.
  • Explain spatial variation of and describe patterns of cultural and social expression including language, religion, ethnicity, race, gender, sexuality, political processes, urbanization, development, agriculture, manufacturing and service economies.
  • Synthesize theories of human migration to explain historical and contemporary patterns of human mobility.
  • Describe the distribution of humans globally and explain the tools used by geographers to evaluate human population change.
  • Analyze the spatial expression and cultural impacts of contemporary globalization.
  • Describe the scope of the discipline of geography and the tools used by geographers to study human processes on the earth.
Human Geography - Honors GEOG 2H
  • Describe the tools and theories used in geographic research.
  • Analyze the spatial variation of humans and their activities around the world.
  • Describe human impacts on the environment including impacts of the use of renewable and non-renewable energy resources.
  • Explain spatial variation of and describe patterns of cultural and social expression including language, religion, ethnicity, race, gender, sexuality, political processes, urbanization, development, agriculture, manufacturing and service economies.
  • Synthesize theories of human migration to explain historical and contemporary patterns of human mobility.
  • Describe the distribution of humans globally and explain the tools used by geographers to evaluate human population change.
  • Analyze the spatial expression and cultural impacts of contemporary globalization.
  • Describe the scope of the discipline of geography and the tools used by geographers to study human processes on the earth.
  • Evaluate the relationship between humans and the environment.
Introduction to Criminology SOC 5
  • Students will be able to use criminological theories and research to analyze of the nature, extent, and causes of crime and delinquency.
  • Students will be able to apply a sociological understanding to assess how race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and age affect victimization patterns, arrest rates, charges, sentencing, and treatment of criminals.
Introduction to Criminology - Honors SOC 5H
  • Students will be able to use criminological theories and research to analyze of the nature, extent, and causes of crime and delinquency.
  • Students will be able to apply a sociological understanding to assess how race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and age affect victimization patterns, arrest rates, charges, sentencing, and treatment of criminals.
Introduction to Gerontology SOC 4
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will know major concepts of gerontology.
Introduction to LGBTQ Studies SOC 130
  • Students will explore the intersections of homophobia, transphobia, sexism, heterosexism, racism, classism, ageism, ableism, and other intersecting identities within the context of LGBTQ political struggles in the United States.
  • Students will analyze the various ways people identify their sexual orientation, their gender identity and expression, or both in the U.S. and abroad through an intersectional framework.
Introduction to Logic PHIL 3
  • Students will learn to translate arguments into symbolic form to test their validity.
  • Students will be able to apply deductive and inductive reasoning to morals, politics, science, literature, and everyday life scenarios.
  • Students will learn to distinguish arguments from non-arguments.
  • Students will be able to distinguish and evaluate inductive and deductive arguments using criteria of evaluation such as valid\/invalid, strong\/weak, etc.
  • Students will learn to analyze informal fallacies.
  • Students will be acquainted with the various forms of definitions and learn to construct proper definitions.
Introduction to Logic - Honors PHIL 3H
  • Students will learn to distinguish arguments from non-arguments.
  • Students will be able to distinguish and evaluate inductive and deductive arguments using criteria of evaluation such as valid\/invalid, strong\/weak, etc.
  • Students will learn to analyze informal fallacies. \n
  • Students will be acquainted with the various forms of definitions and learn to construct proper definitions.
  • Students will learn to translate arguments into symbolic form to test their validity.
  • Students will be able to apply deductive and inductive reasoning to morals, politics, science, literature, and everyday life scenarios.
Introduction to Psychology PSYC 1A
  • Apply psychological principles to personal observations and \/ or experiences.
  • Differentiate the major theoretical perspectives of psychology.
  • Demonstrate psychology is a science by explaining how psychology utilizes the scientific method.
Introduction to Psychology - Honors PSYC 1AH
  • Be able to differentiate the major theoretical perspectives of psychology.
  • Apply psychological principles to personal experiences.
  • Explain how psychology utilizes the scientific method
Introduction to Sociology SOC 1
  • Students will identify the role of culture and socialization in the development of one’s beliefs, opinions, and values.
  • Students will apply sociological research to distinguish the interrelatedness of various social institutions and the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will identify and apply the main sociological theoretical frameworks to analyze social stratification based on race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups.
Introduction to Sociology - Honors SOC 1H
  • Students will apply sociological research to distinguish the interrelatedness of various social intuitions and the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will identify and apply the main sociological theoretical frameworks to analyze social stratification based on race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups.
Marriage and the Family SOC 14
  • Students will use sociological concepts to identify the intersection of race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups as well as the impact on the socialization and interaction within the changing family.
Marriage and the Family - Honors SOC 14H
  • Students will use sociological concepts to identify the intersection of race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups as well as the impact on the socialization and interaction within the changing family.
Sociology of Religion SOC 7
  • Students will be able to apply a sociological understanding to assess religion, religious groups, religious conflict on society, and different denominations.
  • Students will be able to differentiate between church, sect, and cults and between religious socialization and religious conversion.
Special Projects in Sociology SOC 99
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or work) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusion or judgements) as part of their special project coursework.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual according to their special project of interest.
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences PSYC 10
  • Perform and evaluate descriptive (e.g., mean, median, mode, variance, standard deviation) and inferential (e.g., Pearson correlation, t tests, z test, and one-way analysis of variance) statistics.
  • Using SPSS software, correctly input data, analyze data, and interpret output for descriptive statistics, t tests, correlation, and one-way analysis of variance.