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Student Learning Outcomes

Discipline: Degree: AA-T - Sociology
Course Name Course Number Objectives
Asian American Communities SOC 36
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will be able to describe with clarity a change in cultural attitudes over time.
Child Development SOC 15
  • Students will be able to apply a sociological understanding physical growth and social, emotional, and cognitive development from conception to adolescence across all major concepts of child development.
  • Students will be able to apply a sociological understanding of the various social and environmental forces that shape child development.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will know major concepts of child development.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
Critical Analysis and Writing ?Honors PHIL 9H
  • Students will be able to evaluate arguments (strong/weak, valid/invalid). (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to develop a thesis statement that advances a clear argument. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will learn to analyze informal fallacies. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to distinguish inductive and deductive arguments. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students completing an assignment in Critical Analysis and Writing Honors course will be able to develop a thesis statement that advances a clear argument.
Critical Thinking PHIL 8
  • Students will be able to evaluate arguments (strong/weak, valid/invalid). (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to apply problem-solving skills to their personal belief systems and social issues. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to identify the premises/reasons for supporting the conclusion within an argument. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will learn to analyze informal fallacies. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to distinguish inductive and deductive arguments. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students completing an assignment in Critical Thinking will be able to develop a thesis statement that advances a clear argument.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
Critical Thinking and Logical Writing PHIL 9
  • Students will be able to evaluate arguments (strong/weak, valid/invalid). (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to develop a thesis statement that advances a clear argument. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will learn to analyze informal fallacies. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will demonstrate proficiency (precision, clarity, organization) in argumentative writing (with a total of 5,000-6,000 words for the semester), where positions are defended, and ideas are explored. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to distinguish inductive and deductive arguments. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students completing an assignment in Critical Thinking and Logical Writing will be able to develop a thesis statement that advances a clear argument.
  • Students will take an embedded surveys to identify their knowledge of Evaluating Arguments (Strong/weak, Cogent/Uncogent; Valid/Invalid, Sound/Unsound).
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
Critical Thinking and Writing ENGL 1C
  • Students will evaluate the soundness of arguments.
  • In conversation with multiple texts, whether assigned by the instructor or chosen by the student, students will write a formal argument.
Critical Thinking and Writing - Honors ENGL 1CH
  • Students will evaluate the soundness of arguments.
  • In conversation with multiple texts, whether assigned by the instructor or chosen by the student, students will write a formal argument.
Elementary Statistics Math 110
  • Determine the appropriate statistical methods by data type and number of populations or treatments.
  • Utilize statistical techniques with a variety of applications that pertain to business, the social, natural and physical sciences.
  • Students will be able to determine descriptive statistics from a sample
  • Students will be able to use sample statistics to develop a confidence interval for population parameters
  • Using sample statistics from one or more samples, students will be able to test a claim made about a population parameter.
  • Using bivariate data, students will be able to determine whether a significant linear correlation exists between two variables and determine the equation of the regression line.
  • Math 110 students will feel comfortable in their math class.
  • Math 110 students will demonstrate the thinking skill of accurate self-assessment.
  • Math 110 students will feel that mathematics is a beneficial part of their education.
  • Math 110 students will feel they have the resources necessary for their success.
  • Math 110 students will demonstrate the ability and willingness to take the steps necessary to succeed in their math class.
  • Define basic statistical terms and notation.
  • Describe the proper methods of sampling.
  • Describe the distributions of quantitative data in terms of center, shape, and spread.
  • Infer from observational and experimental studies.
  • Explain the basic concepts of probability theory and calculate probabilities.
  • Employ the principles of inferential statistics in estimation and hypothesis testing.
  • Utilize computer technology in statistical analyses.
Elementary Statistics -Honors Math 110H
  • Students will be able to determine descriptive statistics from a sample.
  • Students will be able to use sample statistics to develop a confidence interval for population parameters
  • Using sample statistics from one or more samples, students will be able to test a claim made about a population parameter
  • Using bivariate data, students will be able to determine whether a significant linear correlation exists between two variables and determine the equation of the regression line.
  • Math 110H students will feel comfortable in their math class.
  • Math 110H students will demonstrate the thinking skill of accurate self-assessment.
  • Math 110H students will feel that mathematics is a beneficial part of their education.
  • Math 110H students will feel they have the resources necessary for their success.
  • Math 110H students will demonstrate the ability and willingness to take the steps necessary to succeed in their math class.
  • Define basic statistical terms and notation.
  • Describe the proper methods of sampling.
  • Describe the distributions of quantitative data in terms of center, shape, and spread.
  • Infer from observational and experimental studies.
  • Explain the basic concepts of probability theory and calculate probabilities.
  • Determine the appropriate statistical methods by data type and number of populations or treatments.
  • Employ the principles of inferential statistics in estimation and hypothesis testing.
  • Utilize statistical techniques with a variety of applications that pertain to business, the social, natural and physical sciences.
  • Utilize computer technology in statistical analyses.
  • Demonstrate ability to combine appropriate data gathering techniques and ability to express statistical conclusions in formal writing to complete a large, semester-long project.
General Cultural Anthropology ANTH 22
  • Students will be able to examine the field of anthropology and its history as a holistic discipline.
  • Students will be able to explain ethnographic field work and cultural relativism.
  • Students will be able to identify and analyze ethnocentric attitudes and beliefs in themselves and as expressed by others.
  • Students will be able to illustrate the evolution of culture through the development of civilization.
  • Students will be able to distinguish human language as a unique form of communication.
  • Students will be able to explain and analyze the potential influence of culture on personality development, and on the structure of marriage and the motivation for particular marriage rules.
  • Students will be able to analyze and describe differences between kinship and nonkinship systems of organization in various societies, as well as the various patterns of political organizations.
  • Students will be able to contrast and compare the various subsistence patterns required in various environments including methods of exchange and differences in consumption practices.
  • Students will be able to contrast and compare the universal functions of religion and art in various cultures.
  • Students will be able to evaluate and describe the influence of American culture on various ethnic groups.
  • Students will be able to identify and predict the current and future problems facing humanity.
Human Geography GEOG 2
  • Describe the tools and theories used in geographic research.
  • Evaluate the relationship of humans and the environment.
  • Analyze the spatial variation of humans and their activities around the world.
  • Describe the scope of the discipline of geography and the tools used by geographers to study human processes on the earth.
  • Analyze the spatial expression and cultural impacts of contemporary globalization.
  • Describe the distribution of humans globally and explain the tools used by geographers to evaluate human population change.
  • Synthesize theories of human migration to explain historical and contemporary patterns of human mobility.
  • Explain spatial variation of and describe patterns of cultural and social expression including language, religion, ethnicity, race, gender, sexuality, political processes, urbanization, development, agriculture, manufacturing and service economies.
  • Describe human impacts on the environment including impacts of the use of renewable and non-renewable energy resources.
Human Geography - Honors GEOG 2H
  • Analyze the spatial variation of humans and their activities around the world.
  • Evaluate the relationship between humans and the environment.
  • Describe the tools and theories used in geographic research.
  • Describe the scope of the discipline of geography and the tools used by geographers to study human processes on the earth.
  • Analyze the spatial expression and cultural impacts of contemporary globalization.
  • Describe the distribution of humans globally and explain the tools used by geographers to evaluate human population change.
  • Synthesize theories of human migration to explain historical and contemporary patterns of human mobility.
  • Explain spatial variation of and describe patterns of cultural and social expression including language, religion, ethnicity, race, gender, sexuality, political processes, urbanization, development, agriculture, manufacturing and service economies.
  • Describe human impacts on the environment including impacts of the use of renewable and non-renewable energy resources.
Introduction to Criminology SOC 5
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will know major concepts of criminology.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
  • Students will be able to use criminological theories and research to analyze of the nature, extent, and causes of crime and delinquency.
  • Students will be able to apply a sociological understanding to assess how race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and age affect victimization patterns, arrest rates, charges, sentencing, and treatment of criminals.
Introduction to Criminology - Honors SOC 5H
  • Students will be able to apply a sociological understanding to assess how race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and age affect victimization patterns, arrest rates, charges, sentencing, and treatment of criminals.
  • Students will be able to use criminological theories and research to analyze of the nature, extent, and causes of crime and delinquency.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will know major concepts of criminology.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
Introduction to Gerontology SOC 4
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will know major concepts of gerontology.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
Introduction to Psychology PSYC 1A
  • Differentiate the major theoretical perspectives of psychology.
  • Demonstrate psychology is a science by explaining how psychology utilizes the scientific method.
  • Apply psychological principles to personal observations and / or experiences.
  • Identify the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, core empirical findings, and historic trends in psychology.
  • Compare and contrast major theoretical perspectives of psychology (e.g., psychoanalytic, behavioral, humanistic, etc.)
  • Apply concepts and theories from the following general domains: (a) biological bases of behavior and mental processes, (b) sensation and perception, (c) consciousness, (d) learning and memory, (e) cognition, intelligence, and language (f) lifespan development (g) motivation and emotion, (h) gender and sexuality, (i) stress and health, (j) social psychology, (k) personality, and (l) psychological disorders and approaches to treatment.
  • Apply psychological principles to personal experience.
  • Compare and contrast research methods in psychology, including advantages and disadvantages of each (e.g., observation, case study, survey, correlational method, experimental method).
  • Distinguish between scientific and non-scientific methods of understanding.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social institutions and human behavior.
Introduction to Psychology - Honors PSYC 1AH
  • Be able to differentiate the major theoretical perspectives of psychology.
  • Explain how psychology utilizes the scientific method
  • Apply psychological principles to personal experiences.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social institutions and human behavior.
Logic in Practice PHIL 3
  • Students will be able to distinguish and evaluate inductive and deductive arguments using criteria of evaluation such as valid/invalid, strong/weak, etc. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will learn to analyze informal fallacies. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be acquainted with the various forms of definitions and learn to construct proper definitions. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will learn to translate arguments into symbolic form to test their validity. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will learn to distinguish arguments from non-arguments. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students completing an assignment in Logic will be able to develop a thesis statement that advances a clear argument.
Logic in Practice - Honors PHIL 3H
  • Students will learn to distinguish arguments from non-arguments. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be able to distinguish and evaluate inductive and deductive arguments using criteria of evaluation such as valid/invalid, strong/weak, etc. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will learn to analyze informal fallacies. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will be acquainted with the various forms of definitions and learn to construct proper definitions. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students will learn to translate arguments into symbolic form to test their validity. (Rev. 6/2020)
  • Students completing an assignment in Logic Honors will be able to develop a thesis statement that advances a clear argument.
  • Students will identify knowledge of Classifying Arguments (Inductive/Deductive).
  • Students identify knowledge of Evaluating Arguments (Strong/Weak, Cogent/Uncogent; Valid/Invalid, Sound/Unsound)
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
Marriage and the Family SOC 14
  • Students will use sociological concepts to identify the intersection of race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups as well as the impact on the socialization and interaction within the changing family.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will know major concepts of marriage and family.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
Marriage and the Family - Honors SOC 14H
  • Students will use sociological concepts to identify the intersection of race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups as well as the impact on the socialization and interaction within the changing family.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will know major concepts of marriage and family.
Sociology SOC 2
  • Students will be able to understand and demonstrate the analysis of how controversial public issues arise in contemporary American society and the interplay between race, class, gender, sexuality and other social groups.
  • Students will be able to identify and analyze how sociological principles and concepts are applied in the understanding of social problems.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
Sociology SOC 1
  • Students will identify and apply the main sociological theoretical frameworks to analyze social stratification based on race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups.
  • Students will apply sociological research to distinguish the interrelatedness of various social intuitions and the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will identify the role of culture and socialization in the development of one’s beliefs, opinions, and values.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will know major concepts of sociology.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
Sociology - Honors SOC 1H
  • Students will identify and apply the main sociological theoretical frameworks to analyze social stratification based on race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups.
  • Students will apply sociological research to distinguish the interrelatedness of various social intuitions and the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will thoroughly know the major concepts of General Sociology.
  • Students will demonstrate an thorough understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will thoroughly analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students will identify the role of culture and socialization in the development of one’s beliefs, opinions, and values.
Sociology - Honors SOC 2H
  • Students will be able to identify and analyze how sociological principles and concepts are applied in the understanding of social problems.
  • Students will be able to understand and demonstrate the analysis of how controversial public issues arise in contemporary American society and the interplay between race, class, gender, sexuality and other social groups.
  • Students will demonstrate an thorough understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will thoroughly analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior
  • Students will know major concepts of social problems.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
Sociology of Ethnic Relations SOC 20
  • Students will know major concepts of race and ethnicity.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will use sociological research concepts and theories to identify and analyze the social constructions of race and ethnicity, its interactions with different aspects of society, and its impact on the experiences of different racial/ethnic groups.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their sociology coursework.
  • Students will use sociological research concepts and theories to identify and analyze the social constructions of race and ethnicity, its interactions with different aspects of society, and its impact on the experiences of different racial/ethnic groups.
Sociology of Ethnic Relations - Honors SOC 20H
  • Students will know major concepts of the sociology of race and ethnic relations.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students will use sociological research concepts and theories to identify and analyze the social constructions of race and ethnicity, its interactions with different aspects of society, and its impact on the experiences of different racial/ethnic groups.
Sociology of Religion SOC 7
  • Students will know the major concepts of religion.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
Special Projects in Sociology SOC 99
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will demonstrate inquiry (a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works) and analysis (assessment of evidence resulting in conclusions or judgments) as part of their Honors coursework.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between social, political, and/or economic institutions and human behavior.
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences PSYC 10
  • Perform and evaluate descriptive (e.g., mean, median, mode, variance, standard deviation) and inferential (e.g., Pearson correlation, t tests, z test, and one-way analysis of variance) statistics.
  • Using SPSS software, correctly input data, analyze data, and interpret output for descriptive statistics, t tests, correlation, and one-way analysis of variance.
  • Define and distinguish basic statistical terms and notation including scales of measurement.
  • Chart and interpret simple and cumulative frequency distributions.
  • Distinguish the difference between sample and population distributions and analyze the role played by the Central Limit Theorem.
  • Compute and describe the effects of various measures of central tendency and variability.
  • Describe and explain the normal curve including how z-scores are used and calculated.
  • Describe and interpret statistical error, effect size and power.
  • Formulate and test research hypotheses through the use of various inferential statistical procedures: t-tests, ANOVA, chi-square.
  • Compute and interpret descriptive statistics including correlation and regression.
  • Conduct and interpret statistical analyses using statistical software.