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Student Learning Outcomes

Discipline: Degree: AA-T - Music - A0347
Course Name Course Number
Individual Instruction MUS 160
  • Students who complete MUS 16 will be able to demonstrate proficiency at playing technical exercises as assigned by the private teacher.
  • Students who complete MUS 16 will be able to preform from one to three pieces of music or songs learned during the semester, as requested by the faculty jury.
  • Perform representative repertoire using good stage presence.
  • Use appropriate playing or singing techniques.
  • Demonstrate interpretative skills.
  • Demonstrate regular practice habits.
  • Memorize music for performance
Chamber Music MUS 27
  • Develop growth in musical and technical skills as instrumentalists
  • Students will gain experience in recognizing common classical rhythmic patterns through music preparation.
  • Students will gain experience recognizing common musical stylistic elements, including pitch identification, dynamics, and varied articulation, through music preparation.
  • Play wind repertory in various styles.
Chambers Singers MUS 45
  • Students will be able to identify the correct solfege syllable for example notes in any major key.
  • Students will be able to identify all major key signatures and names of notes in the treble and bass clefs.
  • The Mt SAC Chamber Singers will travel to Cincinnati, Ohio to perform at the ACDA National Conference in the Spring of 2023. \nThe students will have the opportunity to perform their own concert as well as listen to other choirs from around the United States and various countries. The students will be asked to come up with differences and similarities between the different performing ensembles and to evaluate each groups performance.
  • Sight read musical pieces.
  • Memorize music and present public performances as a member of an ensemble.
  • Develop vocalizing skills.
  • Blend with each voice in groups.
  • Harmonize with each voice in groups.
  • Differentiate tone colors needed for effective interpretation of the music.
Concert Choir MUS 31
  • Demonstrate skill in effective group singing and following the conductor at all times.
  • Utilize vocalizing skills to blend effectively with each voice in the section.
  • Utilize vocalizing skills to harmonize with other sections of the choir
  • Apply proper breath support to singing
  • Contrast tone colors to express correct meaning of text.
  • Students will be able to identify all major key signatures and names of notes in the treble and bass clefs.
  • Practice and apply elements of vocalizing.
  • Students will be able to identify the correct solfege syllable for example notes in any major key.
DJ Performance MUS 180
  • Improvise in realtime using Musical Instrument Digital Interface and Disc Jockey controllers
Jazz Encemble MUS 47
  • Students will gain experience in recognizing common jazz and commercial rhythmic patterns through music preparation.
  • Students will gain experience recognizing common musical elements, including pitch identification, dynamics, and varied articulation, through music preparation.
  • To measure the benefits of travel with performing ensembles.\n\nThe Mt SAC Jazz Ensemble will travel to compete at the Reno Jazz Festival. \nCompetition is important in measuring student success as well as gaining recognition for the college as a whole. \n\nStudents also gain exposure to other community college programs as well a 4 year university programs. This exposure shows the students the level that must be attained to perform with a high level university program.\n\nStudents will also gain an educational benefit through the various master classes offered throughout the festival.\n
  • Play jazz repertory in various styles.
  • Develop growth in musical and technical skills as instrumentalists.
  • Apply sight-reading skills.
  • Identify stylistic characteristics related to historical accuracy of arrangements
Jazz Improvisation and Performance Choir MUS 50
  • Write out transcriptions of vocal and instrumental improvisation solos.
  • Determine keys and modes for various vocal jazz charts.
  • Perform scat solos and critique them in rehearsal.
  • Prepare small group song interpretations of vocal jazz charts
  • Demonstrate appropriate vocal-jazz articulations (pure vowels, clipped consonants, etc.) while performing.
  • Discuss and define the qualities of good vocal jazz solo singing.
  • The Mt SAC Jazz Improv and Performance Choir will travel to compete at the Next Generation Jazz Festival in Monterey.\nCompetition is important in measuring student success as well as gaining recognition for the college as a whole.\nThis SLO will be measured by the scores and comments acquired during competition.\nIt is expected that the students should score a minimum of 80 out of 100 from each of the 4 judges.\nStudents will also gain exposure to other community college programs as well a 4 year university programs.\nStudents will also gain an educational benefit through the various master classes\noffered throughout the festival.
  • Students will perform an assigned transcribed scat solo with appropriate scat syllables using correct rhythms and pitches. They will perform these solos with at least 80% accuracy.
  • Students will be able to perform a bass line, melody line, and a scat solo to an assigned jazz chart.
Laboratory Band MUS 39
  • Students will gain experience in recognizing common jazz and commercial music rhythmic patterns through music preparation.
  • Students will gain experience recognizing common musical elements (pitch identification, dynamics, and articulation) through music preparation.
  • Play jazz repertory in various styles.
  • Develop growth in musical and technical skills as instrumentalists.
  • Apply sight-reading skills
  • Identify stylistic characteristics related to historical accuracy of arrangements.
Men's Vocal Ensemble MUS 48
  • Students will be able to identify the correct solfege syllable for example notes in any major key.
  • Students will be able to identify all chromatic intervals within an octave or chromatic scale.
  • Demonstrate skill in sight reading music.
  • Sing music of different styles effectively.
  • Blend voices and achieve a well balanced sound.
  • Perform for the college and community.
  • Demonstrate professional musicianship skills
Music Fundamentals MUS 110
  • Calculate the size and quality of intervals and construct intervals of an indicated size using musical notation.
  • Recognize and construct all major and minor scales and key signatures.
  • Analyze triadic harmonies for their root, quality and inversion, and construct triads using musical notation.
  • Interpret rhythm notation.
  • Designate and identify pitches and octave registers on the grand staff and piano keyboard.
  • Music 7 students will be able to identify any key on the piano keyboard using all enharmonic possibilities, including, where possible, single and double accidentals.
  • Students will develop the ability to correctly interpret musical notation, or what is called "basic music literacy."
Music Fundamentals for Musicians MUS 110A
  • Students will know, by the number and type of accidentals, all 15 major keys and 15 minor keys.
  • MUS 2 students will be able to name the chord quality of all diatonic triads and seventh chords in both the major and minor modes.
  • Identify pitches and pitch registers when notated on the staff using G, F or C clefs, or when designated on the piano keyboard.
  • Calculate the duration of notes and rests.
  • Calculate the beat value, beat division, beat type and meter for any regular time signature.
  • Recognize and construct major scales, minor scales and their respective key signatures.
  • Memorize, recall and interpret the circle of fifths
  • Evaluate minor melodies for tonal problems and employ accidentals to correct these problems.
  • Calculate interval inversions.
  • Recognize, calculate and construct intervals between pitches.
  • Distinguish between consonant and dissonant intervals in music notation.
  • Classify cadences by type
  • MUS 5A students will be able to sing on sight a short diatonic melody mixing stepwise motion and occasional skips through the tonic harmony.
  • MUS 5A students will be able to transcribe a diatonic melody played four times at the piano. This melody may use stepwise motion only, except for skips through the tonic triad and skips between 're' and 'ti'.
  • Students will demonstrate, through dictation, an aural understanding of major-mode melodies making use of rhythmic divisions, stepwise motion and occasional leaps through adjacent tones of the tonic and dominant triads.
  • Memorize and recall all diatonic triad and seventh chord qualities in major and minor.
  • Analyze diatonic music for harmony using Roman numerals and bass position figures when the non-chord tones have been omitted or identified for the student
  • Recognize and distinguish the four types of contrapuntal motion.
  • Evaluate two-voice first species tonal counterpoint on the basis of its adherence to style rules and aesthetic guidelines
  • Identify and construct triads and seventh chords
Music Theory I MUS 120
  • MUS 3A students will be able to analyze a diatonic chorale phrase for harmony and non-chord tones.
  • MUS 3A students will be able to realize a diatonic figured bass and analyze its figures for harmony (using Roman numerals). This figured bass may include figures for diatonic triads in any inversion and figures for the dominant seventh chord in any inversion.
  • Locate deviations from normative chord syntax in major and minor chord progressions.
  • Locate and identify contrapuntal errors, voicing errors and line errors in part writing.
  • Realize, in four-part keyboard and SATB style, diatonic figured basses employing the figures 5\/3, 6\/3, 6\/4, 7 and their common variants.
  • Harmonize in four-part keyboard and SATB style a diatonic melody using diatonic triads in any acceptable inversion and the dominant seventh in root position.
  • Compose music in four-part keyboard and SATB style from Roman numerals, outer voices with Roman numerals, basses with Roman numerals, sopranos with Roman numerals and unfigured outer voices.
  • Analyze a diatonic figured bass for harmony using Roman numerals and bass position figures.
  • Analyze, using Roman numerals and bass position figures, diatonic passages from Bach-style chorales employing passing tones, neighbor tones and suspensions.
  • Embellish four-part writing with passing tones, neighbor tones and single suspensions.
  • Locate and classify passing tones, neighbor tones and suspensions in diatonic music employing a chorale texture.
Music Theory II MUS 130
  • Students will be able to analyze a short passage of Classical or Romantic era piano repertoire for harmony and non-chord tones. This passage will incorporate secondary chromaticism and a common chord modulation to the dominant or mediant.
  • Embellish SAB or SATB reductions in a classical style.
  • Compose a rounded binary in unembellished SAB or SATB format.
  • Compose parallel modulating, parallel non-modulating, contrasting modulating and contrasting non-modulating periods in unembellished SAB or SATB format.
  • Compose music in three and four parts from Roman numerals, outer voices with Roman numerals, basses with Roman numerals, sopranos with Roman numerals and unfigured outer voices using chords with a secondary function and modulation.
  • Harmonize in three or four parts a chorale tune using chromatic chords with a secondary function in modulating and non-modulating progressions.
  • Realize in three or four parts a figured bass that employs chromatic chords with a secondary function, with or without sevenths and in any bass position; and 2-3, 4-3, 7-6 and 9-8 suspensions, single or double.
  • Students will be able to spell secondary function chords.
  • Students will be able to realize a chromatic figured bass and analyze its figures for harmony (using Roman numerals). This figured bass may include triadic, seventh chord and single suspension figures in any inversion; it may use diatonic and secondary function chords.
  • Identify by ear themes and variations chosen at random from an assigned listening list.
  • Recognize, identify and diagram period, binary and ternary forms.
  • Analyze, using Roman numerals and bass position figures, keyboard music employing secondary function chords, common chord modulations, phrase modulations, sequential modulations and non-chord tones
  • Analyze a chromatic figured bass for harmony using Roman numerals and bass position symbols.
Music Theory III MUS 140
  • Analyze for harmony, using Roman numerals and bass position figures, any music or musical excerpt from the common practice period, including solo music, keyboard music and ensemble music.
  • Identify by ear sonata form sections and subsections for pieces from an assigned listening list.
  • Locate and identify on a printed musical score the sections and subsections of sonata form.
  • Describe the location and function of each section and subsection of Darcy-Hepokoski Type 3 sonata form.
  • MUS 3C students will be able to analyze a short passage of Classical or Romantic era piano repertoire for harmony and non-chord tones. This passage may incorporate secondary chromaticism, common chord modulation, enharmonic modulation, mode mixture and chromatic "voice leading" chords such as the Neapolitan, augmented sixth and common tone diminished chord.
  • Analyze for harmony, using Roman numerals and bass position figures, any chromatic figured bass.
  • MUS 3C students will, upon hearing 10 one-minute excerpts of pre-assigned sonata form repertoire, be able to identify the composer, composition and formal section or sections (slow introduction, exposition, development, recapitulation or coda) spanned by each excerpt.
  • Realize in three or four parts a figured bass that employs mode mixture, the Neapolitan, augmented sixth chords, common tone diminished chords and advanced techniques of modulation.
  • Harmonize in three or four parts a chorale tune using advanced chromatic techniques, including mode mixture, the Neapolitan, augmented sixth chords, the common tone diminished seventh chord, altered dominants, extended dominants and advanced techniques of modulation.
  • Compose music in three or four parts from Roman numerals, outer voices with Roman numerals, basses with Roman numerals, sopranos with Roman numerals and unfigured outer voices using advanced chromatic techniques, including mode mixture, the Neapolitan, augmented sixth chords, the common tone diminished seventh chord, altered dominants, extended dominants and advanced techniques of modulation.
  • Compose phrases in unembellished SAB or SATB format that modulate to foreign keys using chromatic chords and advanced techniques of modulation.
  • Construct mode mixture chords, the Neapolitan, augmented sixth chords and altered dominants in music notation from Roman numerals and bass position figures.
  • Construct church modes and modes of limited transposition in music notation.
Musicianship I MUS 125
  • Dictate, in correct music notation and Roman numerals, the chords, soprano and bass for phrase-length four-part progressions that make use of diatonic triads in any inversion and V7 in root position.
  • Dictate, in correct music notation, rhythm pieces and patterns that employ a compound beat and values no smaller than the subdivision.
  • Dictate, in correct music notation, melodies and melodic patterns that outline any diatonic triads and V7.
  • MUS 5B students will be able to sing on sight a short diatonic melody mixing stepwise motion and frequent skips through the tonic, subdominant and dominant harmonies.
  • MUS 5B students will be able to transcribe the soprano voice, bass voice and harmony (using Roman numerals and figures) of a six-chord four-part progression played four times at the piano. This progression may use only diatonic triads in root position.
  • Perform at sight rhythm pieces and rhythm patterns in simple meters that use a quarter note beat and include subdivisions.
  • Perform at sight rhythm pieces and patterns in compound meters that use a dotted quarter note beat and include subdivisions.
  • Sing memorized melodies, melodic patterns and duets outlining any diatonic triads and V7 using moveable-do solfege.
  • Sing at sight diatonic melodies, melodic patterns and duets outlining any diatonic triads and V7 using moveable-do solfege.
  • Aurally distinguish between the intervals of the m7, TT and M7 when played melodically.
  • Dictate, in correct music notation, rhythm pieces and patterns that employ a simple beat and values no smaller than the subdivision.
Musicianship II MUS 135
  • Perform at sight rhythm pieces and patterns in compound meters that use a dotted half note or dotted eighth note beat.
  • Perform at sight rhythm pieces and patterns in simple meters that use a half note or an eighth note beat.
  • Students will be able to transcribe the soprano voice, bass voice and harmony (using Roman numerals and figures) of a six-chord four-part progression played four times at the piano. This progression may use diatonic triads and sevenths in any inversion. It may also use secondary dominants, with or without sevenths, in any inversion.
  • Students will be able to sing melodies at sight that incorporate skips through diatonic triads and raised chromatic tones used in a passing or neighboring capacity.
  • Aurally recognize the bass position of major-minor seventh chords.
  • Aurally recognize the quality and bass position of major, minor and diminished triads.
  • Sing at sight melodies, melodic patterns and duets with non-essential chromaticism, secondary function chromaticism and modulations to the dominant or, in minor keys, the relative major.
  • Sing at sight melodies, melodic patterns and duets outlining diatonic descending fifths sequences using moveable-do solfege.
  • Sing memorized melodies, melodic patterns and duets with non-essential chromaticism, secondary function chromaticism and modulations to closely-related keys using moveable-do solfege.
  • Sing memorized melodies, melodic patterns and duets outlining diatonic descending fifths sequences using moveable-do solfege.
  • Perform at sight rhythm pieces and patterns in compound meters that create syncopation.
  • Perform at sight rhythm pieces and patterns in simple meters that create syncopation at the beat and divisional level.
  • Dictate, in correct music notation and Roman numerals, the chords, soprano and bass for phrase-length four-part progressions that make use of secondary function chords.
  • Dictate, in correct music notation, melodies and melodic patterns that make use of non-essential chromaticism, secondary function chromaticism and diatonic descending fifths sequences
  • Dictate, in correct music notation, rhythm pieces and patterns that employ a compound beat and create syncopation.
  • Dictate, in correct music notation, rhythm pieces and patterns that employ a compound beat and create syncopation.
Musicianship III MUS 145
  • MUS 6B students will be able to transcribe the soprano voice, bass voice and harmony (using Roman numerals and figures) of a six-chord four-part progression played four times at the piano. This progression may use any of the harmonic devices covered in MUS 5B and 6A with the addition of the Neapolitan sixth and the root position augmented sixth chord.
  • MUS 6B students will be able to sing on sight a short melody that mixes stepwise motion and occasional skips to outline a tonicized half cadence.
  • Dictate, in correct music notation and Roman numerals, the chords, soprano and bass for phrase-length four-part progressions that make use of mode mixture, the Neapolitan, augmented sixth chords, common tone diminished seventh chords and modulations to closely-related keys.
  • Dictate, in correct music notation, melodies and melodic patterns that incorporate mode mixture, the Neapolitan, augmented sixth chords and modulations to closely-related keys.
  • Dictate, in correct music notation, rhythm pieces and patterns with tuplets.
  • Dictate, in correct music notation, rhythm pieces and patterns that employ a simple beat and create syncopation at the subdivisional level.
  • Aurally recognize all simple and compound intervals.
  • Aurally distinguish between major triads, minor triads, diminished triads, augmented triads, major seventh chords, minor seventh chords, major-minor seventh chords, half-diminished seventh chords and fully-diminished seventh chords.
  • Sing the chromatic scale, the whole tone scale, the octatonic scale and all church modes from a given starting pitch.
  • Sing at sight melodies, melodic patterns and duets that modulate to closely-related keys.
  • Sing at sight melodies, melodic patterns and duets outlining chord progressions that incorporate mode mixture, the Neapolitan and augmented sixth chords using moveable-do solfege.
  • Sing memorized melodies, melodic patterns and duets outlining chord progressions that incorporate mode mixture, the Neapolitan, augmented sixth chords and modulations to foreign keys using moveable-do solfege.
  • Perform at sight rhythm pieces and patterns with irregular meters, changing time signatures and tuplets.
  • Perform at sight rhythm pieces and patterns in simple meters that create syncopation at the subdivisional level.
Wind Ensemble MUS 49
  • Students will gain experience recognizing and identifying common musical stylistic elements including pitch identification, dynamics, and other compulsory musical knowledge.
  • Students will gain experience in recognizing common classical rhythmic patterns through music preparation.
  • Develop growth in musical and technical skills as instrumentalists
  • Play wind repertory in various styles.
Women in Music MUS 101
  • Combine subjective and objective responses in order to articulate a critical opinion about selected musicalworks.
  • Identify and discuss musical elements, using accurate terminology to describe melody, rhythm, harmony, tonecolor, form, and dynamics.
  • Apply critical listening skills to the analysis of musical performances, in both recorded and live formats.
  • Identify stylistic trends, genres, and historical time periods in music.
  • Identify the interactions between gender and the social systems which have historically influenced the creation of musical works.
  • Identify female composers and musicians, and place their lives and work in an historical and cultural context.
Women's Vocal Ensemble MUS 34
  • Students will be able to identify all major key signatures and names of notes in the treble and bass clefs.
  • Students will be able to identify the correct solfege syllable for example notes in any major key.
  • Demonstrate skill in sight reading music.
  • Sing music of different styles effectively.
  • Blend voices to achieve a well balanced sound.
  • Perform for the college and the community.
  • Demonstrate professional musicianship skills.