Ask Joe
Mt. SAC Emergency Alert

Alert: Mt. SAC has Transitioned to Online Classes and Services (see www.mtsac.edu/online). Learn more about our COVID-19 response at www.mtsac.edu/health.

Discipline

  • Results for SLO Disciplines>

Student Learning Outcomes

Discipline: Degree: AA - Liberal Arts Emphasis Natural Sciences - A8988
Course Name Course Number Objectives
Astronomical Observing Laboratory ASTR 5L
  • Students will be able to apply three coordinate systems (terrestrial, equatorial, and alt-azimuth) to globes, maps, atlases and the planetarium.
  • Students will be able to identify parts of equatorial-mount refracting and reflecting telescopes.
  • Students will be able to interpret star atlases, maps, catalogs and planispheres.
  • Students will be able to plot planetary, lunar and/or solar motions on a graph, utilizing appropriate tables of positions, and interpreting the objects' apparent motions on the celestial sphere
  • Students will be able to identify winter and summer constellations and the brightest stars in each by name.
  • Students will be able to classify spectra of main-sequence stars from an objective prism spectrogram, using key reference spectra.
  • Students will be able to compare telescopes to determine which would be the best instrument for a given observation.
  • Students will be able to identify important objects in the sky using planisphere. Start assessing in Fall 08
  • 1) Consider the following 3 telescopes that you can buy at a store. Telescope A: Galilean telescope with 3cm objective lens and 50 cm focal leng Telescope B: Galilean telescope with 10cm objective lens and 100cm focal length Telescope C: Newtonian telescope with 15cm primary mirror and 75cm focal length. All three telescopes come with the same accessories (eyepieces, motorized control, etc.) and are the same quality and price. Note: You may use a telescope more than once. a) Which telescope would you buy if your main interest was observing the structure of craters on Earth's moon? Explain your answer. b) Which telescope would you buy if your main interest was observing a very distant star? Explain your answer. c) Which telescope would you buy if your main interest was observing the moons of Jupiter? Explain your answer. success would be receiving 4 out of 6 points or higher. Each question would be worth 2 points - one point for the correct answer and one point for a valid explanation.
  • Matching of Constellation names with their common names (i.e. Taurus = the bull)
  • Matching of Constellation Names with their shapes / pictures
Biology for Majors BIOL 4
  • Students completing this project will be able to demonstrate the ability to show the relevance of biology on their daily lives.
  • Students will have the ability to form a hypothesis, collect data, conduct statistical analysis, and interpret data.
  • Students will be able to examine the chemical organization and structure of cells, and relate these to cellular processes including transport, synthesis and cell reproduction.
  • Students will be able to apply principles of the scientific method in experimental situations and demonstrate explain the purpose and expected outcomes of laboratory experiments.
  • Students will be able to evaluate experimental results in the laboratory and explain why these may differ from expected results.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the components of the organizational hierarchy within the biosphere.
  • Students will be able to describe the structure of DNA, its mechanism of replication and the implications of this process on inheritance, evolution and biodiversity.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration, and explain the significance of the similarities and differences between the two processes.
  • Students will be able to integrate the principles of ecology to explain relationships within the biosphere and human impact on the planet.
Biology for Majors - Honors BIOL 4H
  • Students completing this project will be able to demonstrate the ability to show the relevance of biology on their daily lives.
  • Students will have the ability to form a hypothesis, collect data, conduct statistical analysis, and interpret data.
  • Students will be able to apply principles of the scientific method in experimental situations and demonstrate explain the purpose and expected outcomes of laboratory experiments.
  • Students will be able to evaluate experimental results in the laboratory and explain why these may differ from expected results.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the components of the organizational hierarchy within the biosphere.
  • Students will be able to describe the structure of DNA, its mechanism of replication and the implications of this process on inheritance, evolution and biodiversity.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration, and explain the significance of the similarities and differences between the two processes.
  • Students will be able to integrate the principles of ecology to explain relationships within the biosphere and human impact on the planet.
  • Students will be able to examine the chemical organization and structure of cells, and relate these to cellular processes including transport, synthesis and cell reproduction.
Cell and Molecular Biology BIOL 8
  • Students will be able to identify the function of each component of the SDS PAGE development process (primary antibody, secondary antibody, biotin, milk protein).
  • Students will be able to accurately draw a plasmid map based on the results of a restriction digest of a plasmid.
Dynamics ENGR 41
  • Students will be able to apply kinematics principles to particles and rigid bodies to obtain position, velocity and acceleration.
  • Students will be able to obtain the location of instantaneous center of rotation of rigid bodies.
  • Students will be able to evaluate forces in connected particles and rigid bodies.
  • Students will be able to use Newton's Second Law for particles and rigid bodies.
  • Students will be able to calculate mass moment of inertia of rigid bodies.
  • Students will be able to apply energy and impulse-momentum principles.
  • Students will be able to apply dynamics to mechanical vibrations of structures.
  • Dynamics students will be able to solve a relative motion problem
  • Dynamics students will be able to solve a differential problem
Earth Science GEOL 8
  • Students will be able to describe the geologic, meteorologic, oceanographic, and astronomic processes that affect the Earth today.
  • Students will be able to synthesize inter-relationships between geologic, meteorologic, oceanographic and astronomic processes.
  • Students will be able to analyze global plate tectonics and its influence on the formation and occurrence of minerals, rocks, earthquakes and volcanoes, continents and oceans, and their physical features.
  • Students will be able to describe and classify essential minerals and rocks that compose the Earth's crust.
  • Analyze atmospheric circulation patterns, their influence on ocean circulation (surface currents, waves, upwellings, etc.), and the physical and chemical factors affecting local and regional weather and climate.
  • Students will be able to describe the origin and composition of Earth's atmosphere and how physical and chemical differences between air masses create clouds, precipitation, lightning and thunder, hurricanes, and tornadoes.
  • Students will be able to describe the origin and nature of the solar system (planets, moons, asteroids, meteoroids, comets) and other astronomic features (stars, galaxies) beyond Earth's solar system.
  • Students will be able to apply scientific terminology and methodology to analyze the natural processes affecting the Earth.
  • Students will be able to assess atmospheric circulation patterns, their influence on ocean circulation (surface currents, waves, upwellings, etc.), and the physical and chemical factors affecting local and regional weather and climate.
  • Plate tectonics
  • Types of rocks - Formation (Geol8)
  • Ocean Circulation
Earth Science Laboratory GEOL 8L
  • Students will be able to apply the scientific method in analyzing Earth's processes.
  • Students will be able to interpret information portrayed on graphs, tables, and maps.
  • Students will be able to classify and identify essential minerals and rocks that compose the Earth's crust.
  • Students will be able to describe the steps and results of a scientific investigation.
  • Students will be able to utilize appropriate methods and tools for data collection in the Earth Sciences.
  • Students will be able to interpret spatial data in the Earth Sciences.
  • Students will be able to apply simple mathematical formulas in describing the velocity of seismic waves, locating an earthquake epicenter, calculating rates of motion of tectonic plates, and determining physical characteristics of ocean waves.
  • (1) SLO: The student will be able to correctly identify the mineral quartz. (2) SLO: The student will be able to determine distance using a topographic map. (3) SLO: The student will be able to calculate the velocity of a wave. (4) SLO: The student will be able to apply principles of relative dating to a hypothetical rock outcrop. A dike intrudes a sandstone. Which of the units is younger? (5) SLO: The student will be able to list the planets in the Solar System.
Ecology and Field Biology BIOL 3
  • Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to show the relevance of biology on their daily lives.
  • Students will be able to explain the concept of natural selection through ecological examples of comparative adaptations.
  • Students will be able to integrate principles of ecology to explain relationships within the biosphere and man's impact on the planet.
  • Students will be able to use dichotomous keys in identification of plant and animal species.
  • Students will be able to examine current ecological applications (i.e. sharing of neighborhoods by people and predatory species, effectiveness of the endangered species act, fragmentation of wildlife habitat, etc.).
  • Students will be able to diagram biogeochemical cycles and their relationship to environmental problems such as acid rain and global warming.
  • Students will be able to apply scientific theories and concerns (e.g. human population growth).
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast environmental topics such as ozone depletion vs. global warming, various animal mating systems, various foraging strategies, etc.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate various field techniques such as insect collection/ mounting, plant pressing, vegetation line transects, etc.
  • Students will be able to identify various local habitat types and their associated organisms, including amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals and plants.
Elements of Physical Geography GEOG 1
  • Apply geographical methodology in the interpretation of spatial relationships involving distance, area, and direction on the earth's surface.
  • Examine the physical forces and processes which operate within the natural environment.
  • Students will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Recognize and identify how physical processes differ from place to place on the globe.
  • Define geography as an integrative discipline using examples of the Earth’s four spheres.
  • Describe common patterns of temperature and temperature inversions, high and low pressure, ocean and land winds, global winds, rain and desert patterns.
  • Compare and correlate the Earth’s major climates and biomes.
  • Locate major physical features of Earth on a series of world maps.
  • Distinguish between internal, mountain-building processes and external, landform-shaping processes.
Engineering Physics PHYS 4C
  • Students will use a laser and single and/or double slit system or diffraction grating and design and execute an experiment to determine the wavelength of a light source.
  • Students will be able to apply the material from the course to real life situations.
  • Students will analyze the hydrogen atom and demonstrate the connection between observed spectral lines and the energy levels in the hydrogen atom.
  • Students will be able to show Einsteins time dilation and length contraction relations starting from appropriate postulates.
  • Students will analyze the hydrogen atom and demonstrate the connection between observed spectral lines and the energy levels in the hydrogen atom
  • Students will successfully experimentally determine the index of refraction of a material experimentally.
  • Students will be able to derive Snell's law
Engineering Physics PHYS 4B
  • Students will be able to apply the material from the course to real life situations.
  • Students will be able to analyze a circuit using Kirchhoff's Rules.
  • Students will be able to make electrical measurements.
  • Students will be able to use an Oscilloscope to measure the effect of frequency on the impedance of an RC circuit.
Engineering Physics PHYS 4A
  • Physics 4A students will be able to calculate the moment of inertia of a typical continuous body.
  • Students will be able to apply the material from the course to real life situations.
  • Students will be able to design an experiment to find the rotational inertia of an object.
  • Students will be able to propagate uncertainty.
  • Students will analytically predict the period of a physical pendulum, then design an experiment to measure the period.
Fundamentals of Genetics BIOL 34
  • Students will be able to determine the mode of inheritance of a human genetic disorder from examining a pedigree of inheritance of that disorder.
  • Students will be able to solve genetics problems including those involving dominance, incomplete dominance, multiple genes, sex linkage, and epistasis.
  • Students will be able to solve genetics problems involving linkage and recombination.
  • Students will be able to describe the components of the eukaryotic genome.
  • Students will be able to relate the structures of DNA to DNA replication.
  • Students will be able to explain the process of RNA and protein synthesis and how these processes are regulated.
  • Students will be able to describe the role of gene expression in development using specific genes as examples.
  • Students will be able to describe types of mutations at the molecular level.
  • Students will be able to describe types of mutations at the chromosomal level including aneuploidies, deletions, duplications, inversions and translocations.
  • Students will be able to discuss the relationship between mutation and molecular evolution and evolution in organisms.
  • Students will be able to describe the methods and applications of recombinant DNA technology.
  • Students will be able to identify and discuss the ethical and moral implications of genetic technology including recombinant DNA technology.
  • students will be able to provide the correct map distance between genes with data from a three point cross.
General Chemistry I CHEM 50
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of solution chemistry such as calculating molarity, making dilutions, and performing stoichiometric calculations.
  • Chem. 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of oxidation-reduction (redox) chemistry such as calculating oxidation numbers, identifying a redox reaction, finding oxidizing and reducing agents, and recognizing oxidation and reduction half-reactions of a redox reaction.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of oxidation-reduction concepts, such as: a. Determining oxidation numbers b. Identifying redox reactions c. Determining the oxidizing and reducing agents in a chemical reaction d. Classifying half-reactions as oxidation or reduction
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of solution chemistry such as: a. calculating molarity b. making dilutions c. performing stoichiometric calculations.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives. This assessment deals with dilutions.
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of solution chemistry such as: a. calculating molarity b. making dilutions c. performing stoichiometric calculations.
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of stoichiometric principles, such as: a. Mole-to-mole conversions b. Mole-to-mass conversions c. Mass-to-mass conversions d. Identifying limiting reactant e. Calculating the theoretical yield f. Calculating the amount of excess reactant
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of oxidation-reduction concepts, such as: a. Determining oxidation numbers b. Identifying redox reactions c. Determining the oxidizing and reducing agents in a chemical reaction d. Classifying half-reactions as oxidation or reduction
General Chemistry I - Honors CHEM 50H
  • Chem 50H students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of solution chemistry such as calculating molarity, making dilutions, and performing stoichiometric calculations.
  • Chem 50H students will be able to; a. predict a compound?s water solubility, b. predict a compound?s water reaction and electrolyte classification, c. predict single and double replacement reaction products including, neutralization, gas formation and, d. identify the net ionic equation for a reaction
  • Chem 50H students will be able to record measurements from common laboratory devices to the proper precision of each device.
  • Chemistry experiment and laboratory report: Determine the enthalpy of 2 different chemical reactions by preparing, experimenting, calculating, and reporting chemical results properly, using critical thinking in offering suggestions on how to improve results in further experimentation.
  • Chem 50H students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of stoichiometric principles, such as: a. Mole-to-mole conversions b. Mole-to-mass conversions c. Mass-to-mass conversions d. Identifying limiting reactant e. Calculating the theoretical yield f. Calculating the amount of excess reactant
General Chemistry II CHEM 51
  • Chem 51 students will be able to; a. Examine and predict the common ion effect on an equilibrium b. Recognize buffer a solution c. Determine pH of a buffer solutions d. Determine pH of a buffer solution upon addition of a strong acid or base. e. Determine chemical quantities needed in order to prepare a buffer solution.
  • Chem 51 students will be able to determine the order, rate law, and rate constant of a chemical equation based on a. Initial rates vs concentration data and b. Graphical analysis of concentration vs time data
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Chem 51 students will be able to a. determine the equilibrium constant expression (Law of Mass Action) when given a balanced chemical equation b. relate the magnitude of the equilibrium constant to the general position of the equilibrium c. determine the value of the equilibrium constant when given concentrations of reactants and/or products and the equilibrium expression d. apply stoichiometric principles to determine concentrations of reactants and/or products (simple algebraic or quadratic equation method) when given initial conditions, the value of the equilibrium constant, and the equilibrium expression e. apply Le Chatelier's Principle to an equilibrium system to predict the shift in equilibrium position when reaction conditions of concentration, temperature, or volume are changed
  • Chem 51 students will be able to a. examine and predict the effect of common ions on an aqueous equilibrium system b. recognize a buffer solution c. determine pH of a buffer solution d. determine pH of a buffer solution upon addition of a strong acid or base e. determine Kb from a corresponding Ka or vice versa f. determine chemical quantities needed in order to prepare a buffer solution of given pH and acid or base concentration
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives. The Chem 51 GEO assessment question for Fall 2012 dealt with solubility equilibria and Le Chatelier?s Principle
  • SLO on Common Ion Effect and Solubility Product Constant (Ksp) focused on the following measureable objectives: 2. Write equilibrium expression for reversible chemical systems. Calculate the equilibrium position, value of the equilibrium constant, and concentrations of all components of the system. 3. Apply Le Chatelier's Principle to systems at equilibrium to predict responses to stresses on the systems. The questions focused on determination of solubility, understanding the concept of Ksp, and the effects of the common ion effect on solubility. Some of the questions related directly to experiences that they had in several lab experiments.
  • By using the concept of Le Chatelier’s Principle, students will be able to a. predict the effect that causes the reaction to shift toward products in a gas phase reaction initially at equilibrium. b. predict the correct effect of different stresses on a gas phase reaction at equilibrium c. predict the correct effect of adding a substance that reacts with a component in the equilibrium system of a slightly soluble salt that was used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment d. predict the correct effect (by color of solution) from adding common ion in the aqueous phase equilibrium system used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment e. predict the correct effect (by color of solution) from adding a substance that reacts with a component in the equilibrium system used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment. The questions focused on determining the direction of shift of a reaction upon adding a variety of stresses to a system at equilibrium. Some of the questions related directly to experiences that they had in several lab experiments
  • By using the concept of Le Chatelier’s Principle, students will be able to a. predict the effect that causes the reaction to shift toward products in a gas phase reaction initially at equilibrium. b. predict the correct effect of different stresses on a gas phase reaction at equilibrium c. predict the correct effect of adding a substance that reacts with a component in the equilibrium system of a slightly soluble salt that was used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment d. predict the correct effect (by color of solution) from adding common ion in the aqueous phase equilibrium system used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment e. predict the correct effect (by color of solution) from adding a substance that reacts with a component in the equilibrium system used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment. The questions focused on determining the direction of shift of a reaction upon adding a variety of stresses to a system at equilibrium. Some of the questions related directly to experiences that they had in several lab experiments.
  • Chem 51 students will be able to a. examine and predict the effect of common ions on an aqueous equilibrium system b. examine and predict the effect of common ions on an aqueous equilibrium system as applied to the Solubility Procudt Constant (Ksp) Experiment c. predicting degree of solubility based on solubility product constants d. calculating the value of the solubility of a solution containing a common ion The questions focused on determination of solubility, understanding the concept of Ksp, and the effects of the common ion effect on solubility. Some of the questions related directly to experiences that they had in several lab experiments.
  • Chem 51 students will be able to a. Define and identify a buffer solution b. Determine the pH of a buffer solution c. Predict the change in pH of a buffer solution upon addition of a strong acid or base d. Determine the chemical quantitates needed in order to prepare a buffer solution of given pH and acid or base concentration
  • Student will be able to understand kinetics
General Physics PHYS 2BG
  • Students will be able to use electronic equipment to determine the resistance of a resistor.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate the meaning of index of refraction and apply Snell's law of refraction to a problem
  • Students will be asked to apply some concept from the course to real life. 70% of the students should be able to make a clear connection between course materials and real life
General Physics PHYS 2AG
  • Students will be able to find the minimum coefficient of friction for a particular equilibrium situation.
  • Students will be able to correctly write the equation of motion to describe a system involving both translation and rotation.
  • Students will be able to experimentally analyze a hanging spring – mass system.
  • Students will be able to analyze a system with two masses, massive pulley, incline and friction.
  • Students will be able to express the velocity of an object in x and y components and magnitude with angle.
  • Students will be able to apply conservation of momentum to solve a problem.
  • students will correctly choose axes perpendicular and parallel to acceleration (not necessarily the surface)
  • Physics 2AG students will be able to draw a correct rigid body diagram for a typical rigid body problem.
  • Students should be able to measure the acceleration of a falling body.
  • Students will be able to apply the material from the course to real life situations.
Geology of the Solar System ASTR 7
  • Students will be able to describe the nature of electromagnetic radiation, and demonstrate basic principles of optics.
  • Students will be able to explain the basic motion of planets, with emphasis on the three basic motions of Earth (rotation, revolution, and precession), what causes them and how they can be measured.
  • Students will be able to describe the major processes operating to shape the surface of the earth.
  • Students will be able to describe the geometry and mechanisms of lunar and solar eclipses and lunar phases.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the limitations and types of instruments that characterize space missions.
  • Students will be able to apply basic principles of remote sensing.
  • Students will be able to describe the various processes responsible for creating and altering the surfaces of planets, moons, asteroids, and meteorites.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast current theories of the origin and evolution of the solar system.
  • Imagine that you were stranded in the middle of the wilderness. You are able to locate Polaris in the sky to find north. Explain how you could use celestial objects (Sun, moon, stars, planets, etc.) to determine when a day, month, and year had passed.
  • 7. Describe the various processes responsible for creating and altering the surfaces of planets, moons, asteroids, and meteorites.
Introduction to Astronomy ASTR 5
  • Students will be able to analyze electromagnetic radiation.
  • Students will be able to identify and explain the basic motion of the planets.
  • Students will be able to compare the three motions of the earth and predict the motion of objects in the sky due to these motions.
  • Students will be able to relate the major structures of the universe to specific units of measurement.
  • Students will be able to explain the motion and phases of the Moon, as well as the mechanism of eclipses.
  • Students will be able to summarize and evaluate current theories of the origin and evolution of the solar system.
  • Students will be able to classify and identify meteorites based on their visual properties.
  • Students will be able to explain stellar evolution.
  • Students will be able to summarize and evaluate our current understanding of cosmology.
  • Kepler's law of planetary motion
  • Imagine that you were stranded in the middle of the wilderness. You are able to locate Polaris in the sky to find north. Explain how you could use celestial objects (Sun, moon, stars, planets, etc.) to determine when a day, month, and year had passed.
Introduction to Astronomy-Honors ASTR 5H
  • Student will be able to classify types electromagnetic radiation.
  • Students will be able to identify and explain the basic motion of the planets.
  • Students will be able to compare the three motions of the earth and predict the motion of the sky due to these motions.
  • Students will be able to relate the major structures of the universe to specific units of measurement.
  • Students will be able to explain the motion and phases of the Moon, as well as the mechanism of eclipses.
  • Students will be able to summarize and evaluate current theories of the origin and evolution of the solar system.
  • Students will be able to classify and identify meteorites based on their visual properties.
  • Students will be able to explain stellar evolution.
  • Students will be able to summarize and evaluate our current understanding of cosmology.
  • Students will be able to identify current developments in astronomy and understand their significance.
  • Students will be able to evaluate and discuss the merits of proposed astronomical instruments (telescopes, satellites, etc.).
  • Imagine that you were stranded in the middle of the wilderness. You are able to locate Polaris in the sky to find north. Explain how you could use celestial objects (Sun, moon, stars, planets, etc.) to determine when a day, month, and year had passed.
Introduction to Oceanography OCEA 10
  • Students will be able to describe how atmospheric circulation influences ocean circulation (surface currents, waves, upwelling, etc.); explain how physical and chemical factors of the ocean affect weather and climate.
  • Students will be able to provide examples of ways in which modern knowledge of the ocean was achieved through use of the scientific method.
  • Students will be able to apply scientific terms and the scientific method in analyzing ocean processes and the results of those processes.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the human impact on the ocean, especially in coastal areas and in relation to global climate change
  • Students will be able to summarize the geologic time scale, and apply it to the age of the Earth and ocean.
  • Student will be able to interpret / apply the effect of oceanographic processes.
  • Course embedded short answer questions.
  • see att doc
  • Students will be able to describe distinctive properties of the water molecule and show how these properties relate to the physical and chemical properties of seawater.
  • Students will be able to describe how atmospheric circulation influences ocean circulation.
  • Students will be able to explain how physical and chemical factors of the ocean affect global and local weather and climate in the past, present and future.
Introduction to Oceanography Laboratory OCEA 10L
  • Students will be able to describe the steps involved in obtaining results in a scientific investigation.
  • Students will be able to collect and analyze ocean salinity, temperature, water depth, and pH data.
  • Students will be able to apply simple mathematical formulas and tools to determine rate of motion of tectonic plates, physical characteristics of ocean waves (e.g. velocity), bathymetry, and chemical characteristics of seawater.
  • Students will be able to interpret information displayed in graphs, tables, charts, and maps.
  • Students will be able to apply the scientific method in analyzing oceanographic data and interpreting ocean processes.
  • (1) SLO: The student will be able to calculate the velocity of tectonic plates given appropriate geophysical data. (2) SLO: The student will be able to explain the origin of lithogenous and biogenous sediment. (3) SLO: The student will be able to calculate the velocity of a wave. (4) SLO: The student will be able to determine ocean floor physiography using a bathymetric map. (5) SLO: The student will be able to analyze ocean salinity data.Generally, which locations exhibit the highest surface salinities?
  • Students will be able to analyze and interpret oceanographic data and interpreting ocean processes such as those responsible for differences in salinity, temperature, density, and changing climate.
Introduction to Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe ASTR 8
  • Student will be able to identify and describe methods of analysis of electromagnetic radiation.
  • Students will be able to describe the scale of the universe and relate it to specific units of measurement.
  • Students will be able to recognize the structure and principles underlying the operation of various telescopes.
  • Students will be able to analyze the structure and location of the Earth and the objects in our solar system as a model of a stellar system in the universe.
  • Students will be able to explain current theories relating to the origins and evolutionary cycles of stars of various masses; include a description and evaluation of our current understanding of the nature of bizarre objects like white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes.
  • Students will be able to identify and describe the various types and structures of galaxies.
  • Students will be able to summarize recent advances in current scientific understanding of the field of cosmology.
  • Students will be able to describe the historical development of cosmology, from the perspectives of ancient cultures up through modern times.
  • Students will be able to describe the motions of celestial objects.
  • Imagine that you were stranded in the middle of the wilderness. You are able to locate Polaris in the sky to find north. Explain how you could use celestial objects (Sun, moon, stars, planets, etc.) to determine when a day, month, and year had passed. New and better wording: Imagine that you were suddenly placed in the middle of the wilderness. You know that you will be stranded here for at least 10 years! You have no contact with other people, either in person or through technology. You also don?t have a watch, compass, or phone! Describe in as much detail as possible how you could use the sky (Sun, Moon, Stars) to keep track of time. Be sure to discuss how you can measure not only short periods of time (days, etc.) but also longer periods of time (months, years, etc.). Also, be sure to mention how you would figure out directions (north, etc.).
Marine Biology BIOL 20
  • Students will be able to distinguish organisms that belong to class Chondrichthyes (fishes with a cartilaginous skeleton) form organisms that belong to class Osteichthyes (fishes with a bony skeleton).
  • Students will be able to describe two major differences between vertebrate and invertebrate marine organisms.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily live
  • Students will be able to differentiate between the major phyla of marine organisms.
  • Students will be able to explain factors that influence winds, currents and tides.
  • Students will be able to identify dominant invertebrates and vertebrates associated with the southern California coast.
  • Students will be able to summarize ecological principles associated with marine ecosystems.
  • Students will be able to explain the process of plate tectonics and its significance in marine environments.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the biological and political factors that are associated with overfishing.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the geological, physical, and chemical aspects of the marine environment and explain how marine organisms adapt to each aspect.
  • Students will be able to analyze the limiting factors of oceanic provinces.
Marine Biology - Laboratory BIOL 21
  • Students will demonstrate an ability to recognize chordgrass, pickleweed, and salt grass and describe the elevational distribution of these plants in a salt marsh.
  • Students will be able to identify 5 different organisms found in the intertidal zone of southern California.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Students will be able to differentiate between the major phyla of marine organisms based on anatomical differences discovered in laboratory dissections.
  • Students will be able to identify dominant invertebrates and vertebrates of the intertidal regions in a field situation by observing differences in distribution at different elevations above sea level.
  • Students will be able to summarize ecological principles associated with marine ecosystems.
  • Students will be able to analyze external and internal anatomy of marine organisms and describe differences in structure between various classes of marine organisms within a particular phylum.
  • Students will be able to relate anatomical structure to life style of various marine organisms, and analyze the significance of the structure and functions of organ systems to the mode of life in the marine environment.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the biological and physical aspects of the marine environment, and explain adaptations of marine organisms to each aspect.
Microbiology MICR 22
  • Explain the basic features of every group of microorganisms.
  • Describe the physiology and genetic processes of microorganisms.
  • Apply physical and chemical methods of controlling microorganisms.
  • Explain the dynamics of host-parasite interaction.
  • Diagnose specific diseases on the basis of symptoms and laboratory test results.
  • Perform basic microbiology lab procedures using appropriate PPE required for this laboratory course.
  • Demonstrate safe handling and proper hazardous waste disposal procedures for microorganisms and chemicals used.
  • Analyze, using student’s own experimental design, effective hand washing.
  • Demonstrate how to properly use the compound light microscope, as well as know its parts, their functions, how to safely transport and clean it.
  • Perform aseptic transfer techniques and interpretations of laboratory results.
  • Students are able to demonstrate aseptic techniques that are appropriate for the allied health fields.
Organic Chemistry CHEM 80
  • Chemistry 80 students should be able to analyze 3-D, Fisher, and Newman projection formulae to determine their structural relationships and relative energies.
  • Chemistry 80 students will be able to predict products and discuss reaction mechanisms of nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions and be able to draw all associated intermediate and transition intermediates.
  • Chem 80 students will be able to analyze 3D, Fischer and Newman projection formula to determine their structural relationships and relative energies.
  • Chem 80 students will be able to predict products and analyze reaction mechanisms of nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions and be able to draw all associated intermediate and transition states.
  • Provided with a molecular formula and the infrared (IR), 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR spectra for an unknown organic molecule, CHEM 80 students will be able to propose a correct structure for the molecule. The assessment consisted of questions in a multiple-choice standardized-exam format (ACS Standardized National Exam), focusing on IR and NMR. In addition, a student survey was administered to gauge the effectiveness of replacing the old computers with new ones in the CTC Lab. Some of the questions targeted direct experience using the CTC lab.
  • CHEM 80 students will be able to demonstrate the effectiveness of the CTC Lab. These updated tools promote their success in organic chemistry.
Organic Chemistry CHEM 81
  • Provided with a molecular formula and the infrared (IR), 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR spectra for an unknown organic molecule, CHEM 81 students will be able to propose a correct structure for the unknown molecule.
  • students will be able to evaluate a multistep synthesis An exit exam where students will analyze the reaction intermediates and reagents necessary to accomplish the multistep synthesis of a given target molecule.
  • Students will use spectral data, such as IR, HNMR, CNMR, DEPT and MS, to determine the structure of a simple organic molecule or product of a reaction.
  • Students will predict the major product of a single-step organic reaction.
  • Provide wit a molecular formula and the infrared(IR), 1H-­-NMR,13C-­-NMR spectra for an unknown organic molecule, CHEM 81 students will be able to propose a correct structure for the unknown molecule.
  • Provided with a molecular formula and the infrared (IR), 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR spectra for an unknown organic molecule, CHEM 81 students will be able to propose a correct structure for the unknown molecule.
  • SLO 2 (Evaluation of a Multi-Step Synthesis) - CHEM 81 students will be able to evaluate a mechanism of a multi-step synthesis reaction.
Physical Geography Laboratory GEOG 1L
  • Interpret maps.
  • Construct maps using cartographic principles.
  • Evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Construct and interpret maps using cartographic principles.
  • Apply principles of earth-sun relationships to concepts of time, seasonal variations in solar energy receipt and overall climatic patterns on earth.
  • Perform functions of temperature and pressure change using lapse rates.
  • Relate the distribution of vegetation to biomes and soil types.
  • Analyze landform features through an understanding of tectonic processes as well as exogenic processes such as erosion and deposition.
Physical Geology GEOL 1
  • Students will be able to apply scientific thinking and scientific method to analyze geologic problems, and the causes and effects of geologic processes.
  • Students will be able to analyze deep time as it relates to the physical and chemical evolution of Earth over time.
  • Students will be able to use simple tools and techniques for field and lab identification of common minerals and rocks.
  • Students will be able to analyze how tectonics influences the formation and occurrence of minerals, rocks, earthquakes, volcanoes, oceans, continents, and landscapes.
  • Students will be able to analyze patterns and trends in observable data from a natural system, and form conclusions based on those patterns and trends.
  • Develop SLOs for Geol1 to be tested during Spring 09
Physical Science PHSC 9
  • Students will be able to describe the methods of energy transfer.
  • Students will be able to describe macroscopic observations and properties in terms of a microscopic (atomic) model.
  • Students will be able to describe the role of each component in a simple electric circuit.
  • Students will be able to accurately take and record measurements of a variety of physical quantities in lab.
  • Students will be able to identify the difference between and atom, molecule, and compound.
  • Students will be able to use Newton's laws to find the acceleration of an object.
  • Students will be able to apply the material from the course to real life situations.
  • Students will be able to write a balanced chemical equation for a double replacement reaction.
  • Students will identify which material has the greatest specific heat capacity.
Plant and Animal Biology BIOL 2
  • Students will be able to construct cladogram. Students will be able to correctly analyze and construct a cladogram using shared and derived characteristics placing species and their characteristics in the proper positions.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives (area B GEO being used as course level SLO)
  • Students will be able to discuss evolutionary changes throughout the geological time scale including topics on systematics, taxonomy, and biological diversity.
  • Students will be able to analyze the current taxonomic classification schemes and discuss how taxonomy is a work in progress.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and describe how they are arranged in a classification hierarchy.
  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the different taxonomic groups (bacteria, protists, plants, animals and fungi) and discuss evolutionary changes that led to their adaptive radiation throughout geological time.
  • Students will be able to define the concept of alteration of generation, and analyze the modifications that have occurred in different organismal groups.
  • Students will be able to describe the life cycles of the important phyla in detail emphasizing evolutionary trends through geological time.
  • Students will be able to describe plant form and function emphasizing evolutionary trends throughout the plant kingdom (including structure, function, growth, transport, nutrition, control systems, reproduction and development.)
  • Students will be able to describe animal form and function emphasizing evolutionary trends throughout the animal kingdom (including structure, function, nutrition, circulation, gas exchange, immune response, internal controls, chemical signals, reproduction, development, behavior, nervous and sensory systems).
  • Students will be able to complete an analysis of plant and animal interactions in relationship to their biomes.
  • Students will be able to classify plants to Family. Students will be able to correctly analyze plant characteristics and be able to place unfamiliar plants into their correct plant families.
Plant Structures, Functions, and Diversity BTNY 3
  • Students will use the Scientific Method for a plant growth project to develop an understanding for how science works.
  • Students will learn a variety of values of botanical organisms inspected in during class and determine the relevance of Botany to their daily lives
  • Identify cells and tissues in stems, leaves and roots.
  • Compare and contrast the anatomical and morphological differences between stems, leaves and roots.
  • Distinguish modifications of stems, leaves and roots with respect to various environmental conditions related to water and food.
  • Evaluate various theories dealing with uptake of water and food and associated transport pathways in vascular plants.
  • Examine, monitor and analyze the growth and development of plants from seed to seed and relate deficiencies in nutrients to growth changes.
  • Summarize the characteristics of plant communities and biomes.
  • Examine the major lines of evolution of plants and the phylogenetic relationships from bacteria to angiosperms, including the work of Charles Darwin and natural selection.
  • Illustrate the ecological concept that every living and non-living thing is interconnected, with emphasis on biotic as well as abiotic factors such as soil and exposure to sun/wind.
  • Compare and contrast the reproductive structures of bacteria, algae, fungi, bryophytes, lower vascular plants, ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms.
  • Discuss the importance of biodiversity and conservation.
  • Value plants, fungi, algae, and the natural world.
Principles of Microbiology MICR 1
  • Be able to determine etiologic agent and identify disease given a series of original infectious diseases case studies.
  • Students will be able to describe the structures/functions of external and internal components of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
  • Students will be able to draw standard growth curves for bacterial cultures and explain factors affecting bacterial growth.
  • Students will be able to Describe characteristics of selected pathogens, and the diseases caused by each.
  • Students will be able to describe the role of genes, chromosomes, mutations and human manipulation in heredity of prokaryotic cells.
  • Students will be able to contrast the metabolic processes of fermentation and aerobic metabolism, noting cycles involved, energy production and end products.
  • Students will be able to outline the general characteristics of viruses, prions, and viroids.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the best method to control microbes in various settings (chemical, physical or chemotherapeutic agents).
  • Students will be able to describe the course of infectious diseases, including the interactions with host defenses.
  • Students will be able to identify the fundamental concepts of immunity, immunization, immune deficiencies and immunological testing.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate aseptic technique and safe handling of microbial cultures
  • Students will be able to prepare smears, perform staining procedures and record microscopic observations.
  • Students will be able to identify an unknown bacterial organism based on results of lab procedures performed and through a miniaturized multitest system; compare findings of these two methods.
  • Students will be able to evaluate physical, chemical and chemotherapeutic agents.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the level of contamination in water, milk, specific food products.
  • Students will be able to perform quantitative plating and turbidity measures to determine the number of bacteria present in a culture sample.
  • Students will be able to describe and accurately draw various microbes based on microscopic observations.
  • Students will be able to perform a molecular separation technique (gel electrophoresis) and identify a DNA source using DNA fingerprinting.
  • Students will be able to observe bacterial transformation by plasmid DNA and describe an acquired phenotypic trait of the transformed cells.
  • Students will be able to use an immunobiotechnological procedure (ELISA) to detect a positive HIV reaction in a simulation.
Statics ENGR 40
  • Engineering 40 students will be able to analyze a typical truss to determine the force in a truss member.
  • Students will be able to draw a free body diagram for a multiforce member and determine reactions.
  • Students will be able to define and apply the fundamental laws of mechanics and calculate resultants.
  • Students will be able to draw free-body diagrams of rigid bodies.
  • Students will be able to apply equations of static equilibrium to two- and three- dimensional problems.
  • Students will be able to determine centroids by integration.
  • Students will be able to expand the usage of equations of static equilibrium to distributed loads and submerged areas.
  • Students will be able to determine internal forces in trusses, frames and machines.
  • Students will be able to analyze systems involving friction such as wedges, belts and screws.
  • Students will be able to use parallel-axis theorem to calculate moment of inertia of structural members.
  • Students will be able to apply principle of virtual work to solve equilibrium problems.
Weather and Atmospheric Environment Laboratory METO 3L
  • Students will be able to comprehend common weather phenomena.
  • Students will be able to Analyze the socio-economic impact of weather and climate change.
  • Students will be able to assess current weather conditions and explain the processes that created these conditions.
  • Students will be able to use electronic and analog equipment in weather data collection.
  • Students will be able to interpret and analyze weather data.
  • Students will be able to predict/forecast weather patterns based on trends in available data.
  • 1) Using a sling psychrometer determine the relative humidity and dew point inside the class and outside the building. 2) Using the temperature data provided and the saturation mixing ratio table, calculate relative humidity. 3) On the meteogram identify when the cold front and/or warm front passed each given location. 4) Calculate the noon sun angle for the dates and locations listed. 5) Using the data provided on the map, identify/dram the locations of the warm and/or cold fronts, the dry line (if present), and general wind directions.
Weather and the Atmospheric Environment METO 3
  • Students will be able to comprehend common weather phenomena.
  • Students will be able to describe and explain current weather events and the processes that created these conditions.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in problem solving skills as they relate to meteorology.
  • Students will be able to interpret and analyze various weather conditions.
  • Students will be able to analyze basic weather trends based on current weather data.
  • Students will be able to Analyze the socio-economic impact of weather and climate change.
  • Student will be able to analyze the map and evaluate meteorologic data
  • 5 multiple choice questions to asses comprehension of common weather phenomena.
  • 11 weather map questions to asses students' ability to analyze basic weather trends based on weather data/map.