Ask Joe   

Discipline

  • Results for SLO Disciplines>

Student Learning Outcomes

Discipline: Radio-Television
Course Name Course Number Objectives
Advanced Campus Radio Station Lab: Program Hosting and Management Skills R-TV 96C
  • Evaluate recorded shows performed by other students and provide a written critique.
Advanced Radio Production R-TV 11B
  • Demonstrate mastery of recording studio techniques.
  • Exhibit the skills of a professional, radio production facility engineer or producer.
  • Apply terminology related to a Pro Tools recording environment.
  • Perform all aspects of recording studio procedures.
  • Evaluate multiple elements of sound, analyze digital audio.
  • Accurately perform quality control on a recording master.
Advanced Video Production R-TV 19B
  • All RTV program students will have an increased awareness of skills required for full-time work in the entertainment industry.
  • All upper level RTV program students will know how to assess their own skills for potential career paths.
  • Write narrative scripts.
  • Act as crew on a remote production shoot.
  • Edit programs using industry standard nonlinear editing software.
  • Set up lighting instruments for both interiors and exteriors to a professional standard.
  • Record and mix sound to a professional standard.
Advanced Voice-Overs Techniques R-TV 37
  • Create voices to match the various characteristics of animated characters.
  • Interpret copy in order to understand its meaning and focus.
American Film History R-TV 24
  • Identify major developments and events in American film history.
  • Identify major industry figures and their contributions.
  • Identify major developments and events in American film history.
  • Analyze the impact of key films in sociological, economic, political, cultural, artistic and technological contexts.
  • Analyze the impact and reflection of minorities and feminism in American film.
  • Analyze the artistic construction of key American films.
Beginning Commercial Voice-Overs R-TV 36
  • Students will demonstrate the proper way to perform a level check for a voice-over audition or session.
  • Students will demonstrate the proper way to record a slate for a voice-over audition or session.
  • Perform a commercial audition.
  • Effectively analyze a commercial script to determine appropriate voicing technique.
  • Take verbal direction on a piece of copy and utilize that direction in the performance of the piece.
  • Determine the who, what, where, when and why of a particular role in a commercial.
  • Recognize the differences between varieties of approaches to a commercial script.
Beginning Radio Production R-TV 11A
  • Students will be able to correctly identify and state the use of the major pieces of equipment found in a radio studio.
  • Students will be able to set a proper microphone level suitable to create a broadcast-quality recording.
  • Identify equipment needed for operation of a studio.
  • Differentiate various editing effects of voice, sound and music in both tape-based and digital technologies.
  • Explain the components of an interview.
  • Combine voice, music and sound effects in the creation of a radio commercial suitable for airing.
  • Demonstrate proper maintenance of studio equipment.
Beginning TV Studio Production R-TV 20
  • All RTV program students will have an increased awareness of skills required for full-time work in the entertainment industry.
  • All upper level RTV program students will know how to assess their own skills for potential career paths.
  • Choose news items to be reported in TV broadcast form from various media available.
  • Compose TV news stories to exact times under deadline constraints.
  • Create TV newscasts at a professional level under deadline constraints.
  • Operate all equipment used in a TV newscast, including cameras, special effects generators, audio recording equipment, audio mixing equipment, editing software, videotape and disc recording devices, teleprompters, graphics generators, and other computers.
  • Perform a TV newscast live in either a 5 or 10-minute format.
Beginning Video Production R-TV 19A
  • All RTV program students will have an increased awareness of skills required for full-time work in the entertainment industry.
  • All upper level RTV program students will know how to assess their own skills for potential career paths.
  • Students exiting RTV 19A will be able to use cameras in both studio and field configurations
  • Use cameras in both studio and field configurations.
  • Apply aesthetic principles of lighting, including three-point lighting, lighting quality, and color temperature.
  • Evaluate basic sound concepts as they apply to video projects through recording and editing of audio
  • Use visual storytelling fundamentals
  • Compose shots that convey meaning through choice of composition, lens and camera placement.
  • Use computer editing software to structure relevant moving images and sound into paced sequences that constitute a complete Narrative-form short film.
Broadcast Law and Business Practices R-TV 15
  • Students will be able to state the requirements for joining the various broadcast unions.
  • Students will be able to explain various elements of a standard broadcasting industry contract.
  • Analyze and evaluate entertainment industry contracts.
  • Contrast and compare union contracts with non-union contracts.
  • Evaluate the role of unions in the entertainment industry.
  • Outline the process to apply for and protect copyrights and trademarks for intellectual properties.
  • Interpret the First Amendment as it applies to electronic media.
Broadcast News Field Reporting R-TV 04
  • Students will be able to research a news story or event in order to discover a minimum of two related stories that could be pursued for broadcast.
  • Students will be able to identify a story on their own and create a feature piece on that story suitable for broadcast on one of the college radio stations.
  • Objectively analyze news events for their broadcast value.
  • Analyze and research news stories and events.
  • Apply legal and ethical evaluators to news stories and their coverage.
  • Properly "advance" news stories.
  • Objectively "enterprise" news stories keeping in mind target demographics.
  • Effectively cover events such as breaking news, news conferences and features.
Broadcast Sales and Promotion R-TV 09
  • Students will be able to identify demographics as they apply to certain radio stations.
  • Students will be able to use demographic data to select an appropriate station for a specific advertiser.
  • Create and explain effective advertising schedules and campaigns applying target demographics and ratings analysis.
  • Evaluate sales figures to determine the effectiveness of campaigns and make recommendations to increase effectiveness of subsequent campaigns.
  • Develop advertising campaigns directed toward a specific demographic.
  • Utilize market surveys and demographic evaluation in developing station and client promotions.
  • Interact, evaluate, and apply talents of on-air personalities with respect to promotions and contests.
  • Use copywriting techniques when developing commercial campaigns.
Broadcast Traffic Reporting R-TV 06
  • Students will be able to translate common law enforcement codes as they pertain to traffic into words.
  • Students will demonstrate that they can perform a concise and informative traffic report.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of radio and television traffic reports.
  • Interpret law enforcement codes as they pertain to traffic reporting.
  • Write a timely, concise, and informative traffic reports for broadcast.
  • Evaluate computer traffic screens and determine which incidents should be included in a particular traffic report.
  • Deliver traffic reports for a variety of different radio and television formats.
Campus Radio Station Lab: Studio Procedures and Equipment Operations R-TV 96A
  • Operate the studio console and equipment during a live one-hour broadcast.
Editing for Film and Television R-TV 22
  • All RTV program students will have an increased awareness of skills required for full-time work in the entertainment industry.
  • All upper level RTV program students will know how to assess their own skills for potential career paths.
  • Operate professional-standard nonlinear editing computer hardware and software.
  • Edit a narrative-form video using continuity editing techniques and cinematic storytelling principles.
  • Synchronize and edit footage from multiple cameras shooting at the same time.
  • Edit a music video using fluid space and time techniques.
  • Export a Deliverable using Codec software appropriate to the target device.
History of Radio DJs R-TV 31
  • Students will be able to discuss the careers of at least one famous radio DJ.
  • Students will understand the law as it applies to Payola and Plugola.
  • Explain how the role of the DJ has changed over the years.
  • Evaluate the influence DJs have had on radio development
  • Identify and explain the various techniques employed by a number of famous DJs to attract and keep audiences.
  • Evaluate current radio DJs in order to determine their influences and effectiveness
  • Identify and evaluate a variety of DJ styles.
Intermediate Campus Radio Station Lab: On-Air and Behind-the-Scenes Skills R-TV 96B
  • Create and execute or plan and produce live two-hour radio shows.
Internet Radio and Podcasting R-TV 17
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the differences between terrestrial and Internet radio.
  • Students will be able to correctly prepare a podcast for transmission.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the development of Internet radio and podcasting.
  • Analyze the connection between traditional radio and Internet radio.
  • Develop interactive strategies between Internet radio and traditional radio.
  • Demonstrate the ability to utilize audience principals in gaining listenership.
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply for music and content licensing.
  • Demonstrate the application of streaming audio.
  • Create and apply Internet radio and podcast programming.
  • Evaluate tradition radio content for Internet application or podcasting.
  • Demonstrate the ability to work within the changing arena of regulation and control of non-traditional radio.
  • Correctly prepare a podcast for transmission.
Introduction to Audio Production for Film and Television R-TV 29
  • Students will be able to separate sound from a 2-minute video clip, re-edit the dialog, music and sound effects of the clip, and recombine it with the video while keeping all dialog and sound effects in sync.
  • Analyze the factors needed to isolate sound effects and original sound clips and merge them into video editing timelines (MO #7).
Introduction to Electronic Media R-TV 01
  • All RTV program students will have an increased awareness of skills required for full-time work in the entertainment industry.
  • All RTV program students will have an increased awareness of professionals in the entertainment industry.
  • Identify key developments in the history of major U.S. electronic media industries, especially their evolution as social, political, and economic forces in U.S. society.
  • Describe the technical evolution of electronic media.
  • Identify the principal means of economic and political support for different electronic media, and discuss their impact.
  • Analyze regulations of electronic media.
  • Define commonly-used electronic communication technology.
  • Identify the business structure and revenue streams for each medium.
Introduction to Screenwriting R-TV 18
  • All RTV program students will have an increased awareness of skills required for full-time work in the entertainment industry.
  • All upper level RTV program students will know how to assess their own skills for potential career paths.
  • Classify various script formats for television writing, including film and videotape.
  • Apply the principles of characterization plot, structure, dialogue, and story development
  • Define the role and tasks of the screenwriter.
  • Write television scripts (film style) by a process that will include a synopsis, step outline, treatment, rough draft, and final draft to current professional standards.
  • Write and perform "pitches" to professional audiences.
  • Define the role of agents and Writers Guild of America in the marketing of scripts.
  • Analyze scripts for proper story construction, character development, and overall structure.
Introduction to Writing for Electronic Media R-TV 28
  • Students will demonstrate proficiency in writing in a variety of script formats, including the radio script, two-column video script, film script and sitcom script formats.
  • Use mechanics of clear and concise writing.
  • Apply technical and aesthetic issues related to writing for the film and electronic media.
  • Use fundamental principles of narrative fiction screenwriting.
  • Write in a variety of script formats, including the radio script, two-column video script, film script and sitcom script formats.
  • Create a complete, short fictional narrative
Media Aesthetics R-TV 14
  • All RTV program students will have an increased awareness of skills required for full-time work in the entertainment industry.
  • Students exiting RTV 14 will be able to analyze and define the differences in how aesthetic principles can be applied in theatrical narratives, television narratives, short narratives, music videos, advertising, and related forms.
  • Analyze and predict the physiological and psychological effects of visual composition, sound design, music and editing upon audience members.
  • Analyze principles of cinematic storytelling through editing, in narrative and nonlinear forms.
  • Conceive and demonstrate principles of visual composition for moving pictures with original compositions of their own.
  • Assess the development of how aesthetics are used in modern productions as opposed to earlier productions.
  • Analyze and define the differences in how aesthetic principles can be applied between the mediums of theatrical narratives, television narratives, short narratives, music videos, advertising, and related forms.
On-Air Personality Development R-TV 02
  • Students will be able to demonstrate their ability to perform as a disc jockey during a one-hour show.
  • Students will be able to clearly articulate words while on the microphone.
  • Demonstrate ability to clearly articulate words.
  • Demonstrate the ability to project words suitable for broadcasting.
  • Demonstrate the ability to regulate pace of speech.
  • Perform in a vocal tone suitable for broadcasting.
  • Identify the relationship between audience demographics and on-air personality.
  • Create and demonstrate an on-air personality for a disc jockey.
  • Create and demonstrate an on-air newscast.
Pop Culture in the Media R-TV 35
  • Analyze the roles of formulating popular culture in film.
  • Evaluate the impact pop culture has had on radio and television throughout the decades.
  • Recognize examples of pop culture in cult films.
  • Explain the role social media.
  • Trace the transition of an idea from fad to popular culture status in TV or film.
Radio and Entertainment Industry Seminar R-TV 97A
  • Students will be able to identify current skills for use in the workplace.
  • Students will be able to identify their role as a broadcaster in their chosen field.
  • Inventory and examine personal and technical skills for use in the workplace.
  • Research possible internship sites.
  • Plan strategies to target and obtain an internship to maximize chances of employment in an area proposed by the student.
  • Create an effective package to secure an internship that showcases the student's major strengths and skills.
  • Evaluate progress at the internship site with instructor and adjust performance to maximize the experience.
Radio Broadcasting Rules and Regulations R-TV 38
  • Explain FCC rules a variety of issues including contests, lotteries, logs, obscenity, and invasion of privacy.
  • Properly prepare the FCC quarterly reports.
Radio Programming and Producer Techniques R-TV 10
  • Students will be able to evaluate a station?s performance by utilizing Arbitron ratings data.
  • Students will be able to list the major duties of a program director at a radio station.
  • Identify various programming techniques for a variety of different radio formats.
  • Create format clocks incorporating a variety of programming elements such as news, traffic and music.
  • Evaluate the benefits of various programming elements such as news and traffic.
  • Evaluate and explain the value of an interview topic with respect to the demographics of a specific radio show and/or station.
  • Explain basic FCC requirements for keeping a radio station on the air.
Radio-TV Newswriting R-TV 05
  • Students will be able to identify news-worthy stories, suitable to a specific demographic from the AP Wire Service for inclusion into their newscasts.
  • Students will be capable of selecting appropriate ?sound bites? from an interview for inclusion into a news story.
  • Determine the newsworthiness of a story as it applies to a demographically-specific audience.
  • Rewrite newswire copy and create stories from facts gleaned from interviews and observation.
  • Incorporate sound bites from interviews into various types of news stories.
  • Define and demonstrate adherence to all laws including but not limited to defamation and slander as they pertain to news stories.
  • Demonstrate the ability to select stories and organize them into a newscast appropriate for a variety of demographics.
  • Follow and research specific stories using the Associated Press Wire Service.
  • Select appropriate news stories from the wire service and organize them into a newscast for a demographically-targeted audience.
Radio/Entertainment Industry Work Experience R-TV 97B
  • Students will be able to identify their role as a broadcaster in their chosen field.
  • Students will complete at least 60 hours per unit of credit of satisfactory work at their internship site.
  • Effectively participate at the internship site to supervisor's standards.
  • Improve skills as prescribed by internship supervisor's evaluations.
  • Demonstrate consistent professional skills at the internship site per supervisor's standards.
  • Demonstrate improvement of skills previously identified as inadequate by site supervisor and/or course instructor.
  • Evaluate performance at internship site and detail methods of improvement.
Reality Show Production R-TV 23
  • After learning the characteristics of non-fiction programs, students will be able to define how reality shows are different from documentaries.
  • Define how reality shows are different from documentaries.
  • Design and verbally present a 2-minute pitch for a reality show with visual aids.
  • Demonstrate proper B-Roll acquisition.
  • Set up a Kino Flo and LED lighting kit without assistance to professional standards.
  • Demonstrate the specialized production techniques needed in reality show production.
Remote Multicamera Production R-TV 21
  • All RTV program students will have an increased awareness of skills required for full-time work in the entertainment industry.
  • All upper level RTV program students will know how to assess their own skills for potential career paths.
  • Direct crew in a multicamera shoot.
  • Set up remote production equipment, including video cameras, power supply, sound recording, and video recording equipment without prompting or other assistance.
  • Operate all equipment in remote production truck including special effects generators, computer graphics units, slow-motion controllers, video recorders, audio mixer boards, and video cameras.
  • Create computer graphics for identification, titling, and credit sequences.
  • Use video engineering devices in synchronizing video and audio signals in a remote multicamera setup.
  • Diagram and design remote video recording setups for various situations, including sporting events, theatrical events, community events, and film style shoots.
Social Media and Online Ethics R-TV 39
  • Evaluate social media content and determine whether it is credible or not.
  • Demonstrate proper and responsible content curation
Social Media in Broadcasting R-TV 32
  • Describe basic website structure.
  • Use Internet terminology.
  • Create, add, and manage audio and video content on websites.
  • Evaluate Internet content with respect to its effectiveness and applicability to specific entertainment topics.
  • Identify media opportunities to exploit content and increase traffic to a specific site.
  • Develop media plans to reach and maintain audiences through audio and video web content.
Special Projects in Broadcasting and Entertainment Industry R-TV 99
  • Students completing their special projects will feel that they have improved their skills in the selected course of study.
  • Students will appreciate the necessity of self motivation and self discipline for the practice of art.
Sportscasting and Reporting R-TV 03
  • Students will be able to properly utilize the equipment necessary for sports reporting.
  • Students will be able to prepare for and conduct in interview with an athlete suitable for broadcast usage.
  • Analyze sporting events, selecting the pertinent points of the competition that impacted the outcome of the games.
  • Utilize the equipment necessary for sports reporting or broadcasting.
  • Create in-progress and final reports on a game within time and length deadlines.
  • Conduct comprehensive interviews and evaluate them with respect to broadcast usage.
  • Demonstrate effective coordination skills with a collegiate or professional sports team in order to gain access to the necessary areas for a sports broadcast, according to industry practice.
Video Engineering R-TV 41
  • Students will be draw a high-level functional block diagram of a video system necessary to produce a live program for broadcast and/or streaming.
  • Students will be able to diagnose and resolve issues with video appliances according to prescribed trouble shooting method.
  • Identify the characteristics of a file based asset and set the parameters of either a software application or a hardware appliance for the media's import into a system.
  • Identify the parameters necessary for the compression of baseband audio and video assets, for either live streaming or to set an appliance for the recording of content to match given set of deliverables parameters.
  • Meet the criteria to apply for an internship or apprenticeship, specific to the field of Video Engineering in either a broadcast or film production company; where knowledge and technical skill are demonstrated by the students final test scores .
Work Experience in Broadcast Entertainment R-TV 101
  • Examine and analyze the role of a professional in the Broadcasting or Entertainment industries.
  • Apply skills learned in previous courses to a worksite situation
  • Develop new expertise in an area of the Broadcasting or Entertainment industries.
  • Develop and apply an industry-standard work ethic and team skills.
  • Improve work performance by adapting and changing as needed according to evaluation by worksite supervisor.
Work Experience in Film and TV R-TV 100
  • All RTV program students will have an increased awareness of skills required for full-time work in the entertainment industry.
  • All upper level RTV program students will know how to assess their own skills for potential career paths.
  • All RTV program students will have an increased awareness of professionals in the entertainment industry.
  • Examine and analyze the role of a professional in film and television.
  • Apply skills learned in previous courses to a worksite situation.
  • Develop new expertise in an area of the film and/or TV industry.
  • Develop and apply an industry-standard work ethic and team skills.
  • Improve work performance by adapting and changing as needed according to evaluation by worksite supervisor.
World Cinema R-TV 25
  • Contrast the differences in viewpoint between international and American film.
  • Identify key figures in cinema and their contributions.
  • Identify major film movements, key films which comprise that movement, and the major authors of those movements.
  • Evaluate the impact of international cinema movements on American film, in both cultural and economic terms.
  • Contrast the differences in viewpoint between international and American film.
  • Summarize the artistic methods used in international films.