RESEARCH & INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS

As part of the Instruction Team, the Research and Institutional Effectiveness (RIE) Office supports the mission of the college by providing accurate, timely, and reliable information to respond to the research needs of the various institutional constituencies. It engages in and supports processes for determining and documenting the effectiveness of programs and services and the institution as a whole in order to foster continuous quality improvement. RIE encourages a collaborative inquiry approach to research projects. 

Office: Bldg. 4 Room 2435
Phone: (909) 274-4109

Recent Research Projects (last updated October 27, 2014)
The following is a brief sampling of some research and planning projects that our team completed. While our listing of projects each year is already filled with mandatory projects (e.g., IPEDS) we are also fortunate to have time to spend with faculty and administrators to answer their questions on their programs and services in order to improve student success and time to degree/transfer. 

Barbara McNeice-Stallard, Director

The past few months were devoted to student equity, accreditation, planning, and basic skills research. This past summer and into the fall, I worked closely with the Student Equity Committee and the RIE department to ensure that both our time-on-task and our vision for equity aligned with the Committee Members' needs. This work required that all of RIE contributed to one or more pieces of the Student Equity Plan. It required a lot of research capacity as well as planning. Turning to accreditation, I am a pivotal team member of a work group that aligns its work with the Accreditation Steering Committee. We provided our first training for the more than 100 people on the Writing Teams for the fall 2016 ACCJC self-evaluation report. Using a collaborative model of inclusion, we created our framework based on our 2010 Accreditation Lessons Learned findings from numerous forums and focus group type meetings. Moving to planning, I was part of two teams that re-reviewed the College's Strategic Plan and improved upon its breadth and depth. Taking on a research-directive focus, my basic skills work allowed the Basic Skills Coordinating Committee to replicate the RP Group's work from Peter Bahr on categorizing both colleges and students. Collaborating with Citrus and Pasadena Colleges, our Team determined that the Bahr work did not align well with noncredit students. Based on this work, we re-framed our thinking and are working with Mt. SAC's Continuing Education to re-examine these students for predictive analytic work. We presented on this topic at an national conference and wrote a chapter for a book on Latino students that we hope will be accepted for publication. 

Maria Tsai, Senior Research Analyst

One effective approach that RIE office constantly utilizes to assist campus programs or units to learn about their impact on students is through cohort tracking.   A cohort here is defined as a group of students sharing some similar characteristics, background or experiences. In collaboration with the Director of Honors Program, Carolyn Kuykendal, a research study tracking the academic completion of 955 Honors program students was conducted in the fall of 2012. This study shows that close to 80% of Honors program cohort students transferred to a four-year institution and majority of them to a University of California (UC) campus. Additionally, for this cohort, the more Honors courses being completed the higher the transfer rate. Study results provide evidence for the Honors Program’s Planning for Institutional Effectiveness (PIE) and was cited in a feature story of this program by American Association of Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) titled: Liberal Learning for Transfer and Beyond: The Honors Program at Mt. San Antonio College. Here is the link to the article (http://www.aacu.org/aacu_news/AACUNews12/december12/feature.cfm)

Other major projects that were recently completed include – the 2013 ACCJC Annual report, the National Science Foundation’s STEP (STEM) Grant annual data collection, the Disproportionate Impact Study on the California Chemistry Diagnostic Test (CCDT) and the Assessment of Written English (AWE) Multiple Measures Study.

Annel Medina, Educational Research Assessment Analyst

As the new Educational Research Assessment Analyst, I have enjoyed learning more about the campus in committee meetings (Institutional Effectiveness Committee member and Guest Member in Outcomes Committee) and RIE team meetings as well as interaction with others on campus.  During the Fall 2012 semester, I met with faculty to discuss student learning outcomes (SLO), collaborated with the Outcomes Coordinator, and completed planning for GEO assessment.  As I am becoming accustomed to campus reporting procedures, I have also been learning to utilize the appropriate Mt. SAC databases/software to perform tasks.  With the guidance and support from my department colleagues, I recently completed a research project with Professor Gary Long.  The research request involved examining students longitudinally that have enrolled in a Math Skills Course (Math 96) and then understanding their progress and success in related Math Courses as well as academic history.  In the future, I am looking forward to working on additional research projects and assisting with the institutional and student learning outcomes on campus. 

Lisa DiDonato, Educational Research Assessment Analyst (AANAPISI and Title V Grants)

Two objectives of the new Title V grant at Mt. SAC are to decrease the rate at which students place into developmental Math and English. Implementing math and English refresher workshops for students before they take their placement tests are activities outlined in the grant to address these objectives. During the summer 2014 term a small math refresher pilot project of Arise students was held. This project not only allowed the Math Department as well as the Title V grant the opportunity to give this type of project a trial run, but it also benefitted the AANAPISI grant objective of improving the rate at which their students pass sequential basic skills courses. The results of this first trial refresher boot camp are encouraging. I just completed an analysis of this project and found that although 79% of the students who participated in the boot camp had previously taken the math placement test, only 18% had taken a math class. After the boot camp, 39% of these students enrolled in a math class. Additionally, among the students who took valid pre and post placement tests, 57% placed into a higher math class on the post-test than they did on the pre-test. Another interesting outcome of this project was accurate test selection. Fewer students took a math placement test that was above their math level after the boot camp than did before. This suggests that students were more aware of either the math placement testing system or they better understood their level as a result of the boot camp. In either case, the boot camp resulted in a smaller percentage of students taking the wrong math placement test. The results of this project are promising and efforts are underway to expand the boot camp to serve all students.

John Barkman, Professional Expert (Perkins)

The Federal Perkins Grant provides money to improve career-technical education. 28 programs at Mt. SAC receive funding from this source. The California Community College Chancellor’s Office Management Information Systems (MIS) Division provides Core Indicator Reports to help evaluate the success of these programs. These reports are based on a complicated analysis linking career-technical education programs and courses with student enrollments. I provided background materials for a workshop with the program managers to help them understand the relationship between how courses are coded and the numbers reported on the Core Indicator Reports. The goal was to 1) ensure that courses are coded correctly, and 2) help managers understand the complex relationship between the Reports and what is happening in their courses.

Daniel Lamoree, Educational Research Assessment Analyst (Temporarily re-assigned to the Information Technology Department to create a Decision-Support System)

Minerva Avila, Professional Expert

My responsibilities in the RIE Office include coordinating external surveys and providing support for the Institutional Review Board (IRB), the Federal Perkins Grant, and other projects as needed. During the 2014 spring semester, I coordinated the administration of both the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) to a sample of students and the aligned Community College Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (CCFSSE) to their professors. I reviewed and analyzed the results of these two national surveys and presented the findings to Mt. SAC administrators. During the summer of 2014, I coordinated the administration of The Freshman Survey, also a national survey aimed at collecting critical information from entering first year college students. The findings from these external surveys provide data that are used for reflection and discussion, planning purposes, and accreditation. Supporting the IRB so that Mt. SAC is in compliance with federal regulations and local policies included a variety of tasks such as filing Mt. SAC's federalwide assurance (FWA), verifying completion of the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) human research subjects ethics training from those conducting research on campus, making the IRB application readily available to interested parties, assisting to ensure that the IRB member composition meets federal requirements, acting as a liaison between principal investigators and the IRB, tracking IRB-approved projects on campus, coordinating changes to the Administrative Policy, updating IRB Committee listing, completing the IRB Committee goals, and preparing the IRB's GAP Analysis. Discussed with the Perkins Grant staff their data needs, provided a counselor report, disaggregated data by degree type, and investigated discrepancies between the Chancellor's Office and Mt. SAC with regard to completed degrees. As needed, provided disaggregated data to the Student Equity Committee.

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Office Location: Bldg. 4 Room 2435 • Phone: (909) 274-4109 • Office Hours: 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., weekdays

 

Mt. San Antonio College

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