Ask Joe
Mt. SAC Emergency Alert

Alert: Mt. SAC has Transitioned to Online Classes and Services (see www.mtsac.edu/online). Learn more about our COVID-19 response at www.mtsac.edu/health.

Courses & Information

Mt. San Antonio College hosts a wide range of courses in English composition, literature, creative writing, and journalism, including courses in developmental composition and grammar, college-level transferable composition and literature courses, and honors courses. These courses serve the needs of transfer students, students seeking AA degrees and specialized certificates, and members of the community at-large.

The department, in particular, provides a substantial undergraduate curriculum and faculty support in the creative writing and journalism programs. In each of our courses, faculty seek to promote critical and creative thinking, providing students with the skills necessary to thrive in their academic pursuits, in the workplace, and in their personal development. 

Three students pose in Mt. SAC clothing on campus

English

    • About Us

      The English program at Mt. San Antonio College hosts a wide range of courses in English composition, including courses in developmental composition and grammar, college-level transferable composition, and honors courses. These courses serve the needs of transfer students, students seeking AA degrees and specialized certificates, and members of the community at-large.

      The department, in particular, provides a substantial undergraduate curriculum and faculty support in the creative writing and journalism programs. In each of our courses, faculty seek to promote critical and creative thinking, providing students with the skills necessary to thrive in their academic pursuits, in the workplace, and in their personal development.

    • Class and Course Rotation

      A full listing of courses with the course descriptions is available in the College Catalog

      ENGL 1A Freshman Composition
      ENGL 1AH Freshman Composition Honors
      ENGL 1B English Introduction to Literary Types
      ENGL 1BH English Introduction to Literary Types
      ENGL 1C Critical Thinking and Writing
      ENGL 1CH Critical Thinking and Writing Honors
      ENGL 8A Creative Writing - Fiction
      ENGL 8B Creative Writing - Poetry
      ENGL 8E Creative Writing - Nonfiction
      ENGL 9 Writing the Personal Journa
      ENGL 10 Writing Enhancement
      ENGL 64 Writing Effective Sentences
      ENGL 65 Grammar Review
      ENGL 66 Paragraph Writing
      ENGL 67 Writing Fundamentals
      ENGL 68 Preparation for English Writing
      ENGL 75 Vocabulary Building
      ENGL 81 Language Acquisition
      ENGL 99 Special Projects in English

      Latin

      A full listing of courses with the course descriptions is available in the College Catalog

      Latin 1 Elementary Latin
      Latin 2 Continuing Elementary Latin

      Literature 

      A full listing of courses with the course descriptions is available in the College Catalog

      LIT 1 Early American Literature
      LIT 2 Modern American Literature
      LIT 3 Multicultural American Literature
      LIT 6A Survey of English Literature
      LIT 6B Survey of English Literature
      LIT 10 Survey of Shakespeare
      LIT 11A World Literature
      LIT 11B World Literature
      LIT 14 Introduction to Modern Poetry
      LIT 15 Introduction to Cinema
      LIT 20 African American Literature
      LIT 25 Contemporary Mexican American Literature
      LIT 33 Images of Women in Literature
      LIT 34 Women Writers
      LIT 35 Science Fiction and Fantasy Survey
      LIT 36 Introduction to Mythology
      LIT 40 Children’s Literature
      LIT 46 The Bible As Literature: Old Testament
      LIT 47 The Bible As Literature: New Testament

      Course Rotation Plan

      Please note: This plan is subject to modification based on staff availability, classroom space, changes in institutional planning, and/or limitation on section offerings due to budget constraints.

      Course

      Title

      Fall

      Spring

      Notes

      Engl 1B

      Introduction to Literary Types

      X

      X

      Both day and evening sections offered.

      Engl 8A

      Creative Writing: Fiction

      X

      ?

       

      Engl 8B

      Creative Writing: Poetry

      X

      ?

       

      Engl 81

      Language Acquisition

       

      X

       

      Engl 99

      Special Projects in English

      X

      X

      May be offered in Winter and Summer. Special Permission
       must be granted by the professor for students to enroll in class.

      Lit 1

      Early American Literature

      X

       

      Both day and evening sections offered.

      Lit 2

      Modern American Literature

       

      X

      Both day and evening sections offered.

      Lit 3

      Multicultural American Literature

       

      X

       

      Lit 6A

      Survey of English Literature

      X

       

      Both day and evening sections offered.

      Lit 6B

      Survey of English Literature

       

      X

      Both day and evening sections offered.

      Lit 10

      Survey of Shakespeare

       

      X

       

      Lit 11A

      World Literature to 1650

      X

       

       

      Lit 11B

      World Literature from 1650

       

      X

       

      Lit 14

      Introduction to Modern Poetry

      X

       

       

      Lit 15

      Introduction to Cinema

      X

      X

      Both day and evening sections offered.

      Lit 20

      African American Literature

      X

       

       

      Lit 25

      Contemporary Mexican American Literature

      X

       

       

      Lit 36

      Introduction to Mythology

      X

      X

      May be offered in Winter and Summer. Both day and evening sections offered.

      Lit 40

      Children’s Literature

      X

      X

       

      Lit 46

      The Bible as Literature: Old Testament

      X

      X

      Fall – day section; Spring – evening section.

      Lit 47

      The Bible as Literature: New Testament

      X

      X

      Fall – evening section; Spring – day section.

    •  Student Learning Outcomes 
       The practice of assessing student learning to determine the effectiveness of curricular design and pedagogy is referred to as “Student Learning Outcomes.” In this process, departments and instructors assess “what students know, think, feel or do as a result of a given learning experience." The specific Student Learning Outcomes identified below are not comprehensive expectancies of student skill and knowledge required by the individual course outlines, and the regular assessment of learning outcomes is not intended to evaluate individual students or faculty. Instead, the “use of assessment [data] stimulates discussion and directs activities that can improve instructional delivery, curricula, programs, and/or services” (Adapted from “Outcomes Assessment Committee, Mt. SAC”).

      Four principles guide the SLO assessment process:

      1. Improve teaching and learning at the course, degree, and certificate level through intentional dialogue amongst practitioners
      2. Create a collaborative, dynamic, and continuous process that engages faculty, students, and personnel to improve student success throughout the entire institution
      3. Utilize assessment to improve from within while providing usable data that demonstrates this improvement to our community
      4. Balance the assessment process between a meaningful and thoughtful practice and the needs of external compliance (Adapted from “Outcomes Assessment Committee, Mt. SAC”)

      Select SLOs do not reflect the full range of learning outcomes within the course outlines, nor does student proficiency in one or both of the SLOs guarantee a passing grade in the course. The use of Student Learning Outcomes is not intended to evaluate individual students or faculty. A fuller description of course expectances—for English 67, 68, and 1A—is contained in "Got Skills?"

      English 1A/1AH
      SLO 1: Students will write an essay in which they synthesize information from multiple texts.
      SLO 2: Students will apply MLA format for citing and documenting sources.
      English 1B/1BH/ All Literature
      SLO 1: Students will write a literary analysis.
      SLO 2/GEO: Students completing an assignment in Humanities Area C will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression.
      English 1C/1CH
      SLO 1: In conversation with multiple texts, whether assigned by the instructors or chosen by the student, students will write a formal argument.
      SLO 2: Students will evaluate the soundness of arguments.
      English 68
      SLO 1: In response to one or more assigned texts, students will write a short expository essay.
      SLO 2: Students will punctuate a variety of sentence types
      English 67
      SLO 1: In response to one assigned text, students will write a unified paragraph.
      SLO 2: Students will summarize short expository and literary texts.
      SLO 3: Students will write logical sentences.
A student poses with the Mountie mascot

Creative Writing

    • About Us
      Mt. SAC Writing Program

      The English Department offers a comprehensive, two-year program in creative writing, which includes classes in poetry, fiction, memoir, journaling, and creative non-fiction. Participating members of the faculty within the program publish their own work across a wide variety of media.

      The program and the department also host the student Creative Writing Club, the literary journal Creepy Gnome, "Writers Day Contest & Festival,” and an annual writing conference, “Writers’ Weekend.”

      During each spring semester, the Creative Writing Program hosts its annual creative writing conference, “Writers Weekend.” Registrants work one-on-one with professional writers, poets, editors, publishers, and professors from the program. All levels of writers can participate in the weekend program.

      For more information about events, please contact Professor John Brantingham at jbrantingham@mtsac.edu or visit the program webpage: http://writersday.mtsac.edu.

       
    • Course Offerings

      A full listing of courses with the course descriptions is available in the College Catalog

      English 8a:  Creative Writing – Fiction (3 units)
      English 8b:  Creative Writing – Poetry (3 units)
      English 8e:  Creative Writing – Memoir (3 units)
      English 8f:  Creative Writing – Non-Fiction (3 units)
      English 9:  Writing the Personal Journal (3 units)
      English 9b:  Expanding the Personal Journal (3 units)

    • Writers Day

      Information about the Writers' Day Content will be coming soon.

    • Writers Weekend

      Weekend of the Arts, April 22-24

      Mount San Antonio College is hosting its 2nd annual Weekend of the Arts featuring the 9th annual Writers’ Weekend. This event is open to participants from our college, other California colleges, and the surrounding community. Fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction writers, scriptwriters, actors, graphic artists, fine artists, and all creative minds: this is your chance to network, workshop, and create with others who share your passion.

      OUR MISSION STATEMENT
      We are committed to celebrating and cultivating the creative works of students and Mount San Antonio College and aspiring artists across the surrounding community.

       WHO IS INVITED
      Classes are available for all ages and experience levels, and we welcome everyone. For more information, check out the Weekend of the Arts Flyer.

      REGISTRATION
      All participants must complete the Weekend of the Arts application by April 8, 2016. A $5 registration fee will cover expenses such as guest speaker and food.

      LUNCH
      Pizza will be provided Friday and Saturday. However, you will need to bring your own refreshments and snacks.

      WHAT TO BRING
      Notebooks, sketchbooks, pens, and pencils
      Copies of your work to share
      Snacks and water

      WRITERS’ WORKSHOPS
      Generate new work with creative writing exercises and have your work critiqued by published writers, publishers, and fellow writers in a fun and comfortable environment. Get a unique look into professional writers’ creative process and share your knowledge and love of writing with others. Some of our workshop leaders this year will include: Myrenna Ogbu, YiShun Lai, Christopher Allan Poe, Bonnie Hearn Hill, Jo Scott-Coe, Christine Lynch, Chad Sweeney, and Stephanie Barbé Hammer.

      COLLEGE CREATIVE WRITING PROGRAMS
      Learn about the options and opportunities available for a degree in creative writing, including Master of Fine Arts (MFA) programs. Learn about these programs and the admission requirements. Start planning for your future in writing.

      PRESENTATION OF 2015-2016 WRITER’S DAY PRIZES
      Join us in congratulating our contest winners. This is an annual prize open to Mt. SAC students for fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry, and critical essays.

      OPEN MIC READINGS
      Open microphone readings are a great way to show appreciation for the work all writers do. Read your work, or you can just sit back and enjoy hearing others’ work.

      VISUAL ARTS WORKSHOPS
      Mt. SAC professors will lead workshops aimed at fusing the visual arts with other art forms, including writing and theater. Studio activities will explore elements of design, ceramics, printmaking, and drawing.

      VISUAL ART VISITING ARTIST SEMINARS
      Learn about the art field from art professionals in the industry through seminars and hands-on activities.

A student uses a joystick and headset in a journalism classroom

Journalism

    • About Us

      The Mt. SAC Journalism Program is being hailed as one of the most innovative college journalism programs in the nation. Our program has been a pioneer in transforming traditional college media to an extensive multimedia, digital presence. Top colleges and universities are restructuring their journalism programs to reflect our groundbreaking model.  

      Our courses prepare students for media in the mobile and digital era, utilizing the latest multimedia tools and relevant publishing platforms to transform students into award-winning journalists.

      Our program turns out versatile and capable journalists who are trained in broad journalistic formats, including investigative reporting, in-depth feature writing, photojournalism, public relations, podcasting, video-casting, and much more.

      We continue to evolve our program offerings to remain on the forefront of today’s journalistic landscape and so that our students are equipped with the skills they need to succeed in the industry.

    • Courses
      Mt. SAC Journalism Courses

      We are dedicated to teaching students how to tap into and refine their skills to become relevant and effective journalists. Our courses prepare students to become well-rounded and highly skilled journalists that are prepared to work in the digital world of media in the future.

      Mt. SAC Journalism Courses
      • JOUR 100 Mass Media and Society   Mass media and interrelationships with society, including history, structure, and trends. Additionally, the following topics will be covered as they pertain to the mass media: economics, law, ethics, technology, and such social issues as gender and cultural diversity.
      • JOUR 101 Beginning Newswriting   Gathering, organizing and writing news in journalistic style across multiple platforms. Writing and reporting based on original interviews and research. Covering meetings, speeches and events, writing under deadline, and the use of Associated Press (AP) Style. Role of the journalist and related legal and ethical issues.
      • JOUR 102 Intermediate News    Newsgathering, organizing and writing news and features in journalistic style across multiple platforms. Public affairs, local and regional government, police, courts, arts and entertainment, and sports beats writing and reporting on and off campus.
      • JOUR 103 Magazine Staff Production Lab   Practical experience in a lab set ting writing and producing the print and online editions of the college student magazine. Writing and editing articles; creating multimedia to accompany stories and images for print, web and broadcast.
      • JOUR 104 Student Media Photography Lab   Practical lab experience in the creation, preparation, and publishing of photos for the student newspaper, magazine, and online media. Provides learning through the use of digital cameras, Photoshop image editing, emerging technology, and scanners. Students may choose to use their own digital cameras, but digital cameras are available in the newsroom for checkout.
      • JOUR 105 Editor Training   Leadership skills in a journalistic set ting using the student media as a practical laboratory. Designed for students selected to serve as editors or managers of the student media.
      • JOUR 106 Online Media Laboratory   Practical experience in a newsroom lab set ting in a variety of online publishing activities to produce and enhance the online student media. Use of computers, software and emerging technologies including audio, video, live broadcast, and wireless computer technology, as well as social media applications.
      • JOUR 107 Race, Culture, Sex and Mass Media Images   Role of mass media and advertising in the integration of minorities, cultures, women, and lesbians, gays-bisexuals, and transgenders LGBT) into American society. Examines how the mass media impacts public attitudes.
      • JOUR 108 Writing for Public Relations   Theory, principles and professional practice of public relations. Concepts of planning and executing effective communication strategies including writing news releases and press pieces, and writing for and distribution through traditional, online and social media outlets, for any organization.
      • JOUR 109 Public Relations Internship   Field work in public relations. A minimum of 75 paid or 60 non-paid clock hours per semester of supervised work is required for each unit of credit. It is recommended that the hours per week be equally distributed throughout the semester. Students who repeat this course will improve skills through further instruction and practice.
      • JOUR 110 Magazine Writing and Production   Writing and production of a student-run magazine. Artistic design, harmony, creativity and layout are stressed. Writing and editing magazine features, designing pages, selecting photographs and illustrations, preparing them for production; working under deadlines and other aspects of the magazine business are included.
      • JOUR 111 Broadcast News Writing   Intensive news gathering and writing for radio and television. Newscast planning, story organization, and functions of a broadcast newsroom are explored. Emphasis on assignments for both audio and videotape media. Lecture and discussion of issues and responsibilities confronting broadcast journalists including ethics and changing technology.
      • JOUR 112 Work Experience in Journalism   This course is designed to provide majors with actual on-the-job experience in an approved workstation, which is related to classroom instruction. A minimum of 75 paid or 60 non-paid clock hours per semester of supervised work is required for each unit of credit. It is recommended that the hours per week be equally distributed throughout the semester. Students who repeat this course will improve skills through further instruction and practice.
      • JOUR 114 Media Practicum I   Newsroom lab setting writing and producing the college student news publications. Researching, writing and editing articles for both publications; photography, videography, and multimedia to create stories and images for print, web and broadcast; layout, design and graphic illustrations. Basic fundamentals of journalism law and ethics.
      • JOUR 115 Media Practicum II   Management and leadership involvement in writing and producing the college student print publications. Researching, writing and editing articles for both publications; photography, videography, multimedia, and emerging new technologies to create stories and images for print, web and broadcast; art direction, layout, design and graphic illustrations. Journalism law, copyright and ethics.
      • JOUR 116 Multimedia Reporting   Multimedia story telling with a journalism emphasis. Techniques explored include the use of video, photos, audio and text to convey interactive news and feature stories for online publishing. Cultivates skills in interviewing, sourcing and information, gathering content using photographic, audio and video recording equipment.

       

    • Publications
      Publications

      A lot is happening in the world today and our student journalists are covering these stories everyday, as they happen. Because our readers get their news online,  we've moved all our publications to the web via multiple online publication platforms. 

      Substance Logo

      In spring 2015, we killed the print version of our magazine, Substance, and launched it digitally on Medium.com--an innovative publishing platform, which allowed us to publish content regularly and expand our reach. 

      Substance is composed of in-depth, long-form journalism covering stories that matter. Student journalists keep a pulse on the interests of our readers from across the country and even internationally, covering the latest stories and events that transcend local interests and bring relevant, significant issues to the surface. Substance, will have you addicted, but it's "Not just another bad habit."    

      Get your fix and follow Substance

       SAC Media Logo

      In the semester following the transition of Substance to Medium, we decided to move our print newspaper, The Mountaineer, to Medium as well. We renamed the publication SAC Media and dubbed "Print without the ink" as our slogan to convey that we would continue to publish relevant content in a digital platform. However, working digitally has allowed us to expand our offerings to include both timely content and multimedia elements in stories. SAC Media focuses on news and events that impact students, faculty and staff, and local residents.

      Students and locals follow us on Medium.

      SOS logo

      In addition to daily reporting on SAC Media, the journalism program launched hyperlocal reporting via Twitter under @SAConScene and #SOSMtSAC where student journalists post up-to-the-minute news clips and updates to keep students, staff, faculty, and local residents informed. We were the first college program  to have a news publication entirely on Twitter. 

      Follow us on Twitter and stay in the know.

    • AA-T Degree
       Transfer Degree

      Mt. SAC now offers an Associate in Arts for Transfer (AA-T) degree in Journalism. Students who complete an associate’s degree for transfer are guaranteed admission to a California State University (CSU) campus.

      Transfer Degree

      Courses required for an AA-T in Journalism:

      Core Courses - 3 courses/9 units from the following:

      • JOUR 100   Intro to Mass Communications
      • JOUR 101   Beginning Newswriting
      • JOUR 114   Media Practicum I

      List A – 1 course or 3 units from the following:

      • JOUR 102   Intermediate Newswriting 
      • JOUR 108   Introduction to PR
      • JOUR 116   Multimedia Storytelling
      • JOUR 115   Media Practicum II

      List B – 2 courses or 6 units from the following

      • PHOT 10 Basic Digital and Film Photography  
      • BUSC 1A Principles of Economics – Macroeconomics

      OR

      • BUSC 1AH Principles of Economics – Macroeconomics – Honors
      • POLI 1 Political Science

      OR

      • POLI 1H Political Science – Honors
      • POLI 2 Comparative Politics
      • ENGL 1C Critical Thinking and Writing

      OR

      • ENGL 1CH Critical Thinking and Writing – Honors 
      • SPCH 20 Argumentation and Debate

      OR

      • SPCH 20H Argumentation and Debate – Honors 

      In addition to the 18 semester units earned for the AA-T in Journalism, below are the other requirements for transfer:

      • Minimum of 60 CSU-transferable semester units
      • Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 in all CSU-transferable coursework
      • All courses in the major must be completed with a grade of C or better or a “P” if the course is taken on a “pass-no pass” basis
      • Certified completion of the California State University General Education-Breadth pattern
      • (CSU GE); OR the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC)

      More about an AA-T in Journalism

       

    • Alumni
       In the last decade, hundreds of students took part in the journalism program. Responsible for a number of roles and responsibilities, students gained the knowledge, skills and experience needed to be successful as journalists, publicists and mass communication professionals in today's media landscape.

      Learn more about the Alumni.