Sign Language

Student Learning Outcomes

Course Number Course Outcome
SIGN 232Advanced Interpreting^ Given a English narrative successfully give a functional equivalent message in ASL in a simultaneous mode. ^ Interpreting students will successfully apply Demand Control Schema (DC-S) Theory to the field of Sign Language Interpreting.
SIGN 202American Deaf Culture^ Students completing an assignment in Humanities Area C will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression. ^ Students will be able to correctly contrast specific aspects of American Deaf culture with general American hearing culture.
SIGN 101American Sign Language 1^ Students completing an assignment in Humanities Area C will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression. ^ Students who take this course and complete it will at the end of the course feel more positively towards Deaf People. (This positive attitude adjustment will be one that moves students away from a pathological view of Deaf People, seeing Deaf people as defective, and towards a Cultural view, seeing Deaf people as individuals with a unique linguistic and cultural background.) APRIL 2008 UPDATE We developed a survey instrument and surveyed all SIGN 101 students the first week of the Spring '08 semester. We will conduct a post survey during the 14th week of the Spring semester. With the results of the second survey we will be able to ascertain whether or not students attitudes towards Deaf people moved in a positive direction. ^ Students will be able to identify immediate and extended family signs.
SIGN 101HAmerican Sign Language 1 - Honors^ Students completing an assignment in Humanities Area C will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression. ^ Students who take this course and complete it will at the end of the course feel more positively towards Deaf People. (This positive attitude adjustment will be one that moves students away from a pathological view of Deaf People, seeing Deaf people as defective, and towards a Cultural view, seeing Deaf people as individuals with a unique linguistic and cultural background.)
SIGN 102American Sign Language 2^ By the end of SIGN 102, American Sign Language 2, 70% of students will be able to successfully comprehend a signed presentation that locates objects in a room. ^ Students completing an assignment in Humanities Area C will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression. ^ Students will properly mark the topic in ASL sentences using non-manual markers. ^ Successfully incorporate topicalization and correct spatial referencing when comparing and contrasting between two different people.
SIGN 103American Sign Language 3^ Be able to use accurately the personal and possessive pronoun signs in spatial means. ^ Students completing an assignment in Humanities Area C will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression. ^ Students will be able to differentiate between the culture of Deaf Americans and that of hearing Americans.
SIGN 104American Sign Language 4^ Students completing an assignment in Humanities Area C will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression. ^ Students will be able to demonstrate various traffic rules with related vocabulary in the list of a study guide. ^ Students will be able to differentiate between the culture of Deaf Americans and that of hearing Americans.
SIGN 105American Sign Language 5^ Students completing an assignment in Humanities Area C will be able to identify the influence of culture on human expression. ^ Students will be able to differentiate between the culture of Deaf Americans and that of hearing Americans. ^ Successfully communicate Health Information in ASL through the use of classifier predicates
SIGN 210American Sign Language Structure^ Students will be able to describe why signs take longer to articulate than words. ^ Students will be able to differentiate between derivational and inflectional morphological processes in ASL ^ Students will be able to identify ASL articulators and contrast them with spoken language articulators.
SIGN 227Cognitive Processing for Interpreters^ Given a piece of discourse in ASL correctly identify themes, main points, and details. ^ Given a piece of discourse in English correctly identify themes, main points, and details.
SIGN 201Deaf Perspectives^ Students will be able to differentiate between language, speech, and communication. ^ Students will be able to evaluate the impact of the Deaf child on the family. ^ Successfully compare and contrast the criteria for different pedagogical approaches to educating deaf and hard of hearing people. ^ Successfully identify three causes of deafness that occurs at/before birth (congenital) and three causes of deafness that occurs after birth (adventitious).
SIGN 225Ethical Decision Making for Interpreters^ Identify differences between a technical professions and a practice professions and explain why interpreting is a practice profession. ^ Interpreting students will successfully apply Demand Control Schema (DC-S) Theory to the field of Sign Language Interpreting. ^ Students will effectively give well-rounded responses to hypothetical and real-life scenarios applying recognized industry standards and support their responses by referencing industry standard publications.
SIGN 108Fingerspelling^ Students will correctly read the fingerspelling of 3 to 4-lettered fingerspelled names ^ Students will correctly read the fingerspelling of phone numbers. ^ Successfully demonstrate the use of lexicalized fingerspelling loan words in grammatically correct ASL sentences. ^ Successfully recognize and record dates about events (historical and/or birthdays) as demonstrated to them in ASL by the instructor.
SIGN 231Interpreting^ Given a English narrative successfully give a functional equivalent message in ASL in a consecutive mode. ^ Interpreting students will successfully apply Demand Control Schema (DC-S) Theory to the field of Sign Language Interpreting.
SIGN 250Interpreting with Classifiers^ Be able to identify and use 13 mouth morphemes in ASL with accuracy and success. ^ Given a sequence of visual events, students will correctly identify appropriate classifier predicates in terms of type of movement root and classifier handshape.
SIGN 239Practicum^ Interpreting students will successfully apply Demand Control Schema (DC-S) Theory to the field of Sign Language Interpreting. ^ Students will identify two aspect of their interpreting process that needs improvement and come up with at least two strategies for improvement.
SIGN 223Principles of Interpreting^ Given three scenarios, students will be able to complete the DCCRD cycle for each scenario with some level of detail. ^ Identify the five levels of discourse register (levels of formality) including what situations call for each level and how each level differs in linguistic expression. ^ Interpreting students will successfully apply Demand Control Schema (DC-S) Theory to the field of Sign Language Interpreting.
SIGn 299Special Projects in Sign Languge/Interpreting^ Complete a quality project from start to finish. This includes a proposal, set goals/objectives for the project and communication of results.
SIGN 220Translation: American Sign Language/English^ When presented with ASL sentences, a sample of students will successfully create grammatically correct functionally equivalent sentences in English. ^ When presented with English sentences, a sample of students will successfully create grammatically correct functionally equivalent sentences in ASL.
SIGN 260Video Interpreting^ Interpreting students will successfully apply Demand Control Schema (DC-S) Theory to the field of Sign Language Interpreting (within the context of Video Interpreting.) ^ Successfully distinguish between (VRS) and video remote interpreting (VRI). Compare and contrast these two types of interpreting.
SIGN 240Vocabulary Building for Interpreters^ Accurately producing ASL equivalent of vocabulary discussed in class ^ Given practice English nomenclature for a specific field, students will correctly come up with ASL equivalent signs or phrases. ^ Producing ASL equivalency when no lexical equivalent is known. ^ Students will demonstrate an understanding of how inflecting specific signs changes their meaning and creates different vocabulary choices in English.