Biology

Student Learning Outcomes

Course Number Course Outcome
HT 14Advanced Histotechniques^ Students will be able to cut 7 blocks with 28 acceptable sections for H&E staining in a 1 hour period. ^ Students will be able to demonstrate and describe decalcification, microtomy, and staining for bone. ^ Students will be able to demonstrate and describe special staining protocols for carbohydrates, amyloid, connective tissues, muscle, and nervous tissues. ^ Students will be able to demonstrate and describe special staining protocols for cytoplasmic granules, minerals, and pigments. ^ Students will be able to demonstrate the operation and maintenance of general types of histological equipment and trouble-shoot equipment problems. ^ Students will be able to describe and demonstrate methods of cytology preparation and staining. ^ Students will be able to describe and practice microtomy of frozen sections. ^ Students will be able to discuss standard protocols involving microwaving. ^ Students will be able to discuss types of microscopes used in histology and compare and contrast the functions. ^ Students will be able to evaluate microtomy and staining results. ^ Students will be able to prepare a resume and cover letter for employment.
ANTH 3Archaeology^ Students will be able to apply the different theories about proposed routes and dates of prehistoric migrations into the New World and illustrate these on a map. ^ Students will be able to define archaeology as part of anthropology (not the study of dinosaurs). ^ Students will be able to differentiate among great ancient cultures by recognizing key artifacts, written languages, and monuments. ^ Students will be able to evaluate dating methods for specific prehistoric materials. ^ Students will be able to evaluate the ethics and legality of unauthorized excavation, collection, display or sale of artifacts, especially from Native American graves. ^ Students will be able to identify and evaluate pseudoscientific interpretations of the past by comparing them with relevant information in the textbook. ^ Students will be able to identify cultural milestones such as ancient stone tool-making techniques and place them in chronological order. ^ Students will be able to illustrate the location of ancient cultures and sites on a world map. ^ Students will be able to interpret subsistence strategies and sociopolitical structures of hypothetical ancient cultures. ^ Students will be able to name, describe, and locate an early civilization
HT 12Beginning Histotechniques^ Compare and contrast various hematoxylin stains. ^ Students will be able to analyze and troubleshoot H&E and microorganism staining procedures. ^ Students will be able to demonstrate proper orientation and embedding of tissue specimens in paraffin. ^ Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to cut acceptable sections while performing routine microtomy of paraffin embedded tissue. ^ Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to perform hematoxylin and eosin staining and microorganism staining of routine paraffin embedded tissue sections. ^ Students will be able to describe and perform tissue processing, including dehydration, clearing, and infiltration. ^ Students will be able to determine acceptable H&E tissue sections. ^ Students will be able to discuss and demonstrate the ability to perform the maintenance and quality control of equipment used in a histotechnology lab, including tissue processors, embedding centers, microtomes, flotation baths, and ovens ^ Students will be able to dismantle and reassemble the knife holder and specimen holder on a rotary microtome. ^ Students will be able to identify the purpose, ingredients, function, and action of histological fixatives and the criteria for choosing the appropriate fixative. ^ Students will be able to identify the purpose, principle, reagents, function, and action of histological stains for routine H&E staining and selected microorganism staining and the criteria for choosing the appropriate control tissue. ^ Students will be able to perform coverslipping procedures correctly and efficiently.
ANTH 1Biological Anthropology^ Students will be able to compare behaviors among primate species, including claims of language and other cultural attributes. ^ Students will be able to contrast and compare scientific and creationist views of evolution. ^ Students will be able to define and illustrate the mechanisms of evolution (such as those responsible for genetic diseases) including mutation, natural selection, gene flow, genetic drift, and non-random mating. ^ Students will be able to describe the basic methods of paleoanthropology and explain the various dating techniques. ^ Students will be able to evaluate the various genetic theories of human behavior and modern variation. ^ Students will be able to evaluate theories relating to the origins of bipedalism, tool use, language, modern Homo sapiens, art and symbolism. ^ Students will be able to evaluate various approaches to the classification of nonhuman and hominid primates such as cladistics vs. traditional systematics and issues about lumping vs. splitting species. ^ Students will be able to identify and differentiate among hominid fossils including the robust and other australopithecines; early genus Homo; Homo erectus; Neanderthals and other archaics; and modern Homo sapiens. ^ Students will be able to identify living and fossil nonhuman primates in terms of skeletal attributes and observed or inferred behaviors. ^ Students will be able to identify the origins of evolutionary thought and the major historical figures in the field. ^ Students will be able to locate other primates [i.e., other than Homo sapiens] on a world map. ^ Students will be able to name one hominin species, describe it, provide an approximate date, and explain why the species can be considered transitional
ANTH 1HBiological Anthropology - Honors^ Students will be able to compare behaviors among primate species, including claims of language and other cultural attributes. ^ Students will be able to contrast and compare scientific and creationist views of evolution. ^ Students will be able to define and illustrate the mechanisms of evolution (such as those responsible for genetic diseases) including mutation, natural selection, gene flow, genetic drift, and non-random mating. ^ Students will be able to describe at least 5 physical and behavioral differences between monkeys and apes ^ Students will be able to describe the basic methods of paleoanthropology and explain the various dating techniques. ^ Students will be able to evaluate the various genetic theories of human behavior and modern variation. ^ Students will be able to evaluate theories relating to the origins of bipedalism, tool use, language, modern Homo sapiens, art and symbolism. ^ Students will be able to evaluate various approaches to the classification of nonhuman and hominid primates such as cladistics vs. traditional systematics and issues about lumping vs. splitting species. ^ Students will be able to identify and differentiate among hominid fossils including the robust and other australopithecines; early genus Homo; Homo erectus; Neanderthals and other archaics; and modern Homo sapiens. ^ Students will be able to identify living and fossil nonhuman primates in terms of skeletal attributes and observed or inferred behaviors. ^ Students will be able to identify the origins of evolutionary thought and the major historical figures in the field.
ANTH 1LBiological Anthropology Laboratory^ Students will be able to analyze genetic data from populations; use the Hardy-Weinberg formula; calculate chi square; and establish selection coefficients and relative fitness. ^ Students will be able to categorize primate behavior and compare behavior among species. ^ Students will be able to construct family pedigrees tracing inherited diseases. ^ Students will be able to determine sex, estimate age and stature, assess population affinity, and identify pathology and trauma of human skeletal remains. ^ Students will be able to identify primates and make taxonomic assignments using cladistic analysis. ^ Students will be able to identify, observe, measure, and construct phylogenetic inferences from hominid fossils. ^ Students will be able to identify, observe, measure, and construct phylogenetic inferences of primate fossils. ^ Students will be able to measure body fat, identify human traits, identify human bones, locate anthropometric measurement points, and make measurements. ^ Students will be able to observe and measure primate dentition, make taxonomic and dietary inferences, observe primate skeletons and construct locomotion inferences. ^ Students will be able to solve problems in Mendelian genetics.
BIOL 50Biology Basic Skills^ Bio 50 students will be able to apply 3 different memorization techniques to their specific course content. ^ Demonstrate good time management skill ^ Develop personal study plans for biology courses. ^ Distinguish the differences in demands of science vs. non-science courses. ^ Interpret information from a graph. ^ Practice effective preparation for biological laboratory as well as lecture sessions. ^ Utilize appropriate test-taking strategies to pass biological science exams and laboratory practicums.
BIOL 4Biology for Majors^ Students completing this project will be able to demonstrate the ability to show the relevance of biology on their daily lives. ^ Students will be able to apply principles of the scientific method in experimental situations and demonstrate explain the purpose and expected outcomes of laboratory experiments. ^ Students will be able to compare and contrast the components of the organizational hierarchy within the biosphere. ^ Students will be able to compare and contrast the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration, and explain the significance of the similarities and differences between the two processes. ^ Students will be able to describe the structure of DNA, its mechanism of replication and the implications of this process on inheritance, evolution and biodiversity. ^ Students will be able to evaluate experimental results in the laboratory and explain why these may differ from expected results. ^ Students will be able to examine the chemical organization and structure of cells, and relate these to cellular processes including transport, synthesis and cell reproduction. ^ Students will be able to integrate the principles of ecology to explain relationships within the biosphere and human impact on the planet. ^ Students will have the ability to form a hypothesis, collect data, conduct statistical analysis, and interpret data.
BIOL 4HBiology for Majors - Honors^ Students completing this project will be able to demonstrate the ability to show the relevance of biology on their daily lives. ^ Students will be able to apply principles of the scientific method in experimental situations and demonstrate explain the purpose and expected outcomes of laboratory experiments. ^ Students will be able to compare and contrast the components of the organizational hierarchy within the biosphere. ^ Students will be able to compare and contrast the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration, and explain the significance of the similarities and differences between the two processes. ^ Students will be able to describe the structure of DNA, its mechanism of replication and the implications of this process on inheritance, evolution and biodiversity. ^ Students will be able to evaluate experimental results in the laboratory and explain why these may differ from expected results. ^ Students will be able to examine the chemical organization and structure of cells, and relate these to cellular processes including transport, synthesis and cell reproduction. ^ Students will be able to integrate the principles of ecology to explain relationships within the biosphere and human impact on the planet. ^ Students will have the ability to form a hypothesis, collect data, conduct statistical analysis, and interpret data.
BIOL 8Cell and Molecular Biology^ Students will be able to accurately draw a plasmid map based on the results of a restriction digest of a plasmid. ^ Students will be able to identify the function of each component of the SDS PAGE development process (primary antibody, secondary antibody, biotin, milk protein).
BIOL 25Conservation Biology^ Analyze the significance of biodiversity to ecological function. ^ Apply current theories of genetics to illustrate problems with inbreeding and small population sizes. ^ Apply principles of the design of nature reserves to the Mt. SAC Wildlife Sanctuary. ^ Compare and contrast similarities and differences between laws that apply to national parks and laws that apply to multiple use public lands. ^ Describe the relationship between the illegal trade in the wool of the Tibetan antelope and the illegal trade in tiger parts from India used for traditional Chinese medicine. ^ Determine, from sample sets of data, the relationship between habitat island size and the degree of isolation on extinction rates. ^ Differentiate between biosphere reserves, national parks, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands, national forest lands, and national wildlife refuges in terms of management philosophies and objectives. ^ Integrate principles of ecology to explain relationships between habitat loss and extinction. ^ Participate in a group project that requires verbal presentation of a topic related to natural resource conservation.
BIOL 5Contemporary Health Issues^ Students completing an assignment in Area E courses will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being. ^ Students will be able to analyze problems in health care delivery in the U.S. ^ Students will be able to compare and evaluate elements of a nutritionally healthy diet. ^ Students will be able to describe risk reduction strategies for preventing sexually transmitted diseases. ^ Students will be able to describe the components of a behavior modification program. ^ Students will be able to describe the effects of psychoactive drugs on multiple body systems. ^ Students will be able to evaluate the interaction between fitness and nutrition and chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. ^ Students will be able to examine the effects of stress on physical and mental health. ^ Students will be able to identify patterns of disease and disability in the U.S. ^ Students will be able to identify risk factors for intentional and unintentional injuries. ^ Students will be able to synthesize the interaction of multiple environmental hazards. ^ Students will be able toiIdentify the benefits of prenatal care and testing. ^ Students will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
BIOL 3Ecology and Field Biology^ Students will be able to apply scientific theories and concerns (e.g. human population growth). ^ Students will be able to compare and contrast environmental topics such as ozone depletion vs. global warming, various animal mating systems, various foraging strategies, etc. ^ Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to show the relevance of biology on their daily lives. ^ Students will be able to demonstrate various field techniques such as insect collection/ mounting, plant pressing, vegetation line transects, etc. ^ Students will be able to diagram biogeochemical cycles and their relationship to environmental problems such as acid rain and global warming. ^ Students will be able to examine current ecological applications (i.e. sharing of neighborhoods by people and predatory species, effectiveness of the endangered species act, fragmentation of wildlife habitat, etc.). ^ Students will be able to explain the concept of natural selection through ecological examples of comparative adaptations. ^ Students will be able to identify various local habitat types and their associated organisms, including amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals and plants. ^ Students will be able to integrate principles of ecology to explain relationships within the biosphere and man's impact on the planet. ^ Students will be able to use dichotomous keys in identification of plant and animal species.
BIOL 34Fundamentals of Genetics^ Students will be able to describe the components of the eukaryotic genome. ^ Students will be able to describe the methods and applications of recombinant DNA technology. ^ Students will be able to describe the role of gene expression in development using specific genes as examples. ^ Students will be able to describe types of mutations at the chromosomal level including aneuploidies, deletions, duplications, inversions and translocations. ^ Students will be able to describe types of mutations at the molecular level. ^ Students will be able to determine the mode of inheritance of a human genetic disorder from examining a pedigree of inheritance of that disorder. ^ Students will be able to discuss the relationship between mutation and molecular evolution and evolution in organisms. ^ Students will be able to explain the process of RNA and protein synthesis and how these processes are regulated. ^ Students will be able to identify and discuss the ethical and moral implications of genetic technology including recombinant DNA technology. ^ students will be able to provide the correct map distance between genes with data from a three point cross. ^ Students will be able to relate the structures of DNA to DNA replication. ^ Students will be able to solve genetics problems including those involving dominance, incomplete dominance, multiple genes, sex linkage, and epistasis. ^ Students will be able to solve genetics problems involving linkage and recombination.
BIOL 34LFundamentals of Genetics Lab^ Students will be able to analyze genetics data with appropriate statistical tests such as a chi-squared test. ^ Students will be able to determine recombination frequencies and construct genetic maps from genetic crosses. ^ Students will be able to determine the mode of inheritance from a pedigree. ^ Students will be able to determine the mode of inheritance of a Mendelian trait from the results of a breeding experiment. ^ Students will be able to measure mutation rates. ^ Students will be able to perform DNA extraction, PCR, and DNA gel electrophoresis. ^ Students will be able to quantify DNA concentration. ^ Students will be able to solve problems in population genetics using the Hardy-Weinberg equation. ^ Students will be able to use online databases to compare DNA and protein sequence data.
BIOL 1General Biology - GE^ Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives ^ Students' developmental learning will be addressed through tailored instruction using clicker technology such that students who are taught in courses using clicker technology will have a greater ability to solve metric problems. ^ An advisory prereq of READ 100 has been added to Bio 1 course outline. It is currently in the queue for review by Ed Design. ^ Assess how population and community dynamics are affected by ecological interactions. ^ Can students answer general questions about community and population ecology and natural selection after completing a related activity in lab? ^ Classify the molecules of living systems and apply basic principles of chemistry to their interaction. ^ Compare and contrast the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in terms of energy transformation in cells. ^ Describe how the systems of the human body interact to maintain homeostasis. ^ Evaluate how life forms duplicate, maintain control, and exhibit hereditary patterns. ^ Explain why evolution is the most all-encompassing scientific explanation for the history of life and the similarities in biochemistry and physiological processes among living things. ^ Relate cell structure and physiology. ^ Students will be able to analyze data and construct a graph of their results in a scientifically appropriate manner. ^ Students' developmental learning will be addressed through tailored instruction using clicker technology such that students who are taught in courses using clicker technology will have greater abilities to understand new terminology through recognizing the meanings of prefixes, suffixes and word roots. ^ Summarize the various types of evidence used to examine evolutionary principles.
ANTH 22General Cultural Anthropology^ Students will be able to analyze and describe differences between kinship and nonkinship systems of organization in various societies, as well as the various patterns of political organizations. ^ Students will be able to contrast and compare the universal functions of religion and art in various cultures. ^ Students will be able to contrast and compare the various subsistence patterns required in various environments including methods of exchange and differences in consumption practices. ^ Students will be able to distinguish human language as a unique form of communication. ^ Students will be able to evaluate and describe the influence of American culture on various ethnic groups. ^ Students will be able to examine the field of anthropology and its history as a holistic discipline. ^ Students will be able to explain and analyze the potential influence of culture on personality development, and on the structure of marriage and the motivation for particular marriage rules. ^ Students will be able to explain ethnographic field work and cultural relativism. ^ Students will be able to identify and analyze ethnocentric attitudes and beliefs in themselves and as expressed by others. ^ Students will be able to identify and predict the current and future problems facing humanity. ^ Students will be able to illustrate the evolution of culture through the development of civilization.
HT 16Histochemistry/Immunohistochemistry^ Students will be able to compare and contrast methods of immunohistochemical staining and identify the hazards involved. ^ Students will be able to discuss flow cytometry. ^ Students will be able to discuss in situ hybridization. ^ Students will be able to evaluate various enzyme histochemical methodologies. ^ Students will be able to identify antibodies: types, structure, their role in the immune process and how they relate to immunohistochemical staining. ^ Students will be able to perform and evaluate manual enzyme histochemistry. ^ Students will be able to practice various commonly used immunohistochemical staining methods, and evaluate the quality of the staining. ^ Students will be able to review the histology and pathology of muscle. ^ Students will be able to solve common problems encountered in immunohistochemical staining. ^ Students will be able to use of controls and apply the appropriate usage.
HT 10Histology^ Students will be able to compare and contrast different types of normal connective tissue (including connective tissue proper, cartilage, bone, and blood) with connective tissue displaying pathological conditions. ^ Students will be able to compare and contrast different types of normal epithelium with epithelia displaying pathological conditions. ^ Students will be able to compare and contrast normal skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle types with muscle tissues displaying pathological conditions. ^ Students will be able to demonstrate proper use and maintenance of the compound microscope. ^ Students will be able to describe cellular components, division and differentiation, stem cells, and levels of maturity of various cell types. ^ Students will be able to distinguish between four primary tissue types: epithelium, connective tissue, muscle, and nervous tissue. ^ Students will be able to identify normal nervous tissue and describe pathological conditions. ^ Students will be able to identify organs within each organ system and describe the normal and pathological histology of these organs. ^ Students will recognize the microanatomy of the basic tissue and organ system tissue types.
ANAT 35Human Anatomy^ After taking Anat 35 students can give the name location, origin and insertion of muscles. ^ Students will be able to demonstrate accurate dissection technique and identification of important muscles, viscera, blood vessels and nerves in the cat, and structures of the sheep brain, eye and heart. ^ Students will be able to describe the structure of organs at the histological level. ^ Students will be able to identify bone markings and their normal variations on human specimens. ^ Students will be able to locate and describe the major organs of the mammalian body. ^ Students will be able to master muscle anatomy and give the name location, origin and insertion of muscles. ^ Students will be able to master the anatomy of the Human Skeletal System including names of bones, whether a paired bone is from the left or right side of the body, and diagnostic features of bones. ^ Students will be able to recognize and describe the fundamental classes of tissues and distinguish between tissue types within each class. ^ Students will be able to review the organization of each organ system and describe and define its components. ^ Students will be able to sequence pathways of movement and flow in such organ systems as circulatory, nervous, reproductive, digestive and respiratory systems.
ANAT 36Human Physiology^ Apply tools of the scientific method including data acquisition (conventional and computerized), simple statistical analysis, and presentation of data to reporting of data collected in laboratory activities. ^ Collect and analyze ECG data. ^ Describe key interactions between organ systems, including acid and base regulation, fluid balance, and metabolic regulation. ^ Determine the number of ATP produced in the complete aerobic respiration of either a triglyceride, a simple sugar, or any combination thereof. ^ Explain the mechanisms of cellular, cardiopulmonary, neuromuscular, sensory, digestive, renal, and reproductive physiology, and the regulation of these mechanisms. ^ Make predictions and draw conclusions which demonstrate physiological principles of physical transport, bioenergetics, hemodynamics, cardiovascular and respiratory dynamics, digestive enzyme kinetics, and renal function. ^ Predict changes in normal physiological pathways that occur in common pathologies. ^ Predict the outcomes of laboratory exercises according to concepts, principles, and laws discussed in the course.
ANAT 40AHuman Prosection^ Demonstrate laboratory practices and procedures in place to ensure a safe laboratory environment and ethical treatment of anatomical specimen. ^ Demonstrate muscles of each body region on a human cadaver specimen to other anatomy students. ^ Demonstrate precise prosection technique while exposing superficial and deep muscles of the human body at the gross level. ^ Identify and explain anatomical variations and abnormalities in deep and superficial muscle between human specimens. ^ Separate the muscles of the human body and identify their origin, insertion and principle action.
ANAT 40BHuman Prosection^ Demonstrate internal structures, blood vessels, and nerves of each body region on a human cadaver specimen to other anatomy students. ^ Demonstrate precise prosection technique while exposing internal organs, blood vessels, and nerves of the human body at the gross level. ^ Identify and explain anatomical variations and abnormalities in internal organs, blood vessels, and nerves between human specimens. ^ Identify, locate, dissect and describe the major organs of the human body while prosecting a human cadaver. ^ List the structures and describe the organization of each organ system while prosecting a human cadaver. ^ Sequence pathways of movement/flow in organ systems such as circulatory, nervous, reproductive, digestive and respiratory.
BIOL 13Human Reproduction, Development and Aging^ Students completing an assignment in Area E courses will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being. ^ Students will able to summarize the biophysical, cognitive, and psychosocial development of infants, toddlers, children, adolescents and adults, and factors that influence these developmental areas. ^ Students will be able to describe cell division, and the principles of genetics, with special emphasis on their impact on human development. ^ Students will be able to describe male and female sexual anatomy and physiology, including sex hormones and their actions. ^ Students will be able to discuss the impact of death in our Western culture, and how we deal with dying, death, loss and bereavement. ^ Students will be able to explain conception, embryological and fetal development, and the birth process, as well as problems that may arise in any of these stages. ^ Students will be able to explain the major developmental theories and scientific methods used to study development. ^ Students will compare and evaluate opposing positions on a controversial issue in lifespan development.
BIOL 15Human Sexuality^ Students demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being ^ Students will compare and evaluate opposing positions on a controversial issue in human sexuality. ^ Students will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
BIOL 15HHuman Sexuality - Honors^ Students completing an assignment in Area E courses will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being. ^ Students demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being. ^ Students will be able to analyze controversies related to current issues in sexual science, and construct reasonable solutions/compromises. ^ Students will be able to compare and evaluate opposing positions on a controversial issue in human sexuality. ^ Students will be able to describe common sexual disorders and therapies, and the sexual abilities and needs of disabled people. ^ Students will be able to describe common variations in sexual behavior. ^ Students will be able to describe how cultural values and ethics influence human sexuality. ^ Students will be able to describe male and female sexual anatomy, physiology and sexual response. ^ Students will be able to describe the events of pregnancy, delivery, and how to enhance the birth of a healthy baby. ^ Students will be able to discuss issues of power, violence and commercialization of sexuality. ^ Students will be able to explain behavioral aspects of human sexuality, regarding gender, relationships and communication. ^ Students will be able to explain sexuality over the lifespan. ^ Students will be able to explain the multi-faceted aspects of sexual orientation. ^ Students will be able to judge the validity of sexual research. ^ Students will be able to locate seminal articles related to a field of sexology and critically evaluate the subsequent progression of data and hypotheses. ^ Students will be able to outline the advantages and disadvantages of various family planning methods. ^ Students will be able to outline the characteristics of major sexually transmitted diseases. ^ Students will be able to synthesize data collected from a literature review, meta-analysis and/or original research in an area of interest related to human sexuality.
BIOL 6Humans and the Environment^ Integrate ecological principles into everyday thought and apply them to decision- making. ^ Appraise the complexities of the biological and environmental problems confronting humans. ^ Contrast the laws of matter and thermodynamics and assess their connections to pollution. ^ Evaluate the "J"-shaped curves of increasing population, natural resource use and pollution with respect to their ability to disrupt the earth's life support system. ^ Evaluate the concept of carrying capacity as it relates to the earth's resources and matter recycling systems. ^ Evaluate the task of moving from simplistic, linear thinking to circular, cybernetic thinking that is harmonious with the ecological cycles that sustain us. ^ Examine the differences between a frontier society and a sustainable earth society. ^ Illustrate the basic ecological concept that everything living and non-living is interconnected. ^ Students will develop intelligent activism in efforts to save the environment from deterioration. ^ Students will learn ecological principles, differentiate which ecological principles relate to specific ecological situations inspected in class and/or determine the relevance of environmental science to their daily lives
BIOL 6LHumans and the Environment Laboratory^ Illustrate a flow chart of an urban water reclamation plant. ^ Analyze and evaluate the pros and cons of resource recycling. ^ Analyze information and describe the effects of nuclear weapons on the abiotic and biotic environment. ^ Analyze the ecological principles presented in a variety of environmental articles. ^ Assess the potential problems of abused ecosystems and describe these problems. ^ Examine and evaluate the biological and social values of the Mt. San Antonio College Wildlife Sanctuary and other ecological reserves. ^ Examine the process of energy production from waste resources. ^ Select appropriate ecological principles from the textbook and integrate these principles in preparing written field notebooks. ^ Students will learn ecological principles, differentiate which ecological principles relate to specific ecological situations inspected in lab and determine the relevance of environmental science to their daily lives ^ Students will summarize and evaluate in writing critical ecological concerns regarding Mt. San Antonio College?s Wildlife Sanctuary ^ Summarize and evaluate critical ecological concerns along the Southern California coast. ^ Summarize the characteristics of California native plant communities.
ANAT 10AIntrodcutory to Human Anatomy^ Students' developmental learning will be addressed through tailored instruction using clicker technology such that students who are taught in courses using clicker technology will have a greater ability to solve metric problems. ^ 75% of students will solve metric-metric and metric-English problems. ^ Describe the functional classes of tissues, and distinguish between tissue subtypes. ^ Describe the structure of the major organs of the human body at the tissue level. ^ Identify and describe structures of the eukaryotic cell. ^ Identify and locate major bone markings on all human bones and determine which side of the body a bone belongs to. ^ Identify body cavities and their contents. ^ Locate and describe the major organs of the human and cat. ^ Review the organs/structures in each organ system and describe the components of each. ^ Sequence functional pathways in organ systems such as circulatory, nervous, digestive, respiratory, musculoskeletal, and reproductive systems. ^ Students will understand 75% of the new terminology through recognizing the word roots, prefixes, and suffixes. ^ Students' developmental learning will be addressed through tailored instruction using clicker technology such that students who are taught in courses using clicker technology will have greater abilities to understand new terminology through recognizing the meanings of prefixes, suffixes and word roots. ^ Use anatomical regions and directional terms to describe positions and relative positions in the human body.
HT 1Introduction to Histotechnology^ Students will be able to describe regulatory and accrediting agencies that set standards for histotechnology laboratories. ^ Students will be able to describe the essential functions necessary for admission and participation in the Histologic Technician Training Program. ^ Students will be able to develop an educational plan (with assistance from counseling faculty) to complete the program and prepare a portfolio to record program progress and skills acquired. ^ Students will be able to identify program admission requirements, essential functions, course requirements, clinical work experience, program policies and procedures, and certification. ^ Students will be able to identify the role of the histotechnician in tissue sample preparation in clinical, research, veterinary, and other histology laboratories. ^ Students will be able to identify the steps in tissue processing that all tissue specimens undergo from arrival in the laboratory to the completed report. ^ Students will be able to list the equipment and reagents needed to process routine tissue specimens. ^ Students will be able to use the internet to locate histotechnology journals, newsletters, conferences, and support resources to be used in subsequent courses and future careers. ^ Students will be informed of the courses required for the Histotechnician training program. ^ Students will set up an employment portfolio for use throughout the program
MICR 26Introduction to Immunology^ Students will be able to analyze and evaluate various immunological assays as to their utility for a particular application. ^ Students will be able to compare and contrast direct and indirect methods of identifying antibody bound to antigen. ^ Students will be able to compare and contrast innate and adaptive immunity. ^ Students will be able to compare and contrast MHC Class I and II and their respective roles in the presentation of intracellular and extracellular antigen. ^ Students will be able to describe the role of antigen presenting cells in eliciting an effective immune response to bacterial and viral infection. ^ Students will be able to describe the use of antibodies in identifying specific antigen in tissue slides. ^ Students will be able to evaluate the contributions of B and T lymphocytes in the specific immune response. ^ Students will be able to evaluate the nature and efficacy of physical and chemical barriers of the innate immune response. ^ Students will be able to examine the structure of the five classes of immunoglobulins and evaluate the role of the specific and nonspecific structural regions relative to immune function. ^ Students will be able to formulate an hypothesis for the treatment of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus using immunotherapy based on an understanding of immune system structure and function. ^ Students will be able to interpret the results of laboratory tests utilizing the following techniques; ELISA, Western Blot, and immunoradial diffusion ^ Students will be able to validate the role of typing and cross-matching in solid organ transplantation.
BIOL 24Introduction to Public Health^ Students will be able to describe how ethics influences health policy. ^ Students will be able to describe how incidence of disease differs from disease prevalence. ^ Students will be able to describe the expanding role of public health occupations in the 21st century. ^ Students will be able to discuss the relationship of public health with the development of health policy. ^ Students will be able to discuss the role of public health in emergency preparedness. ^ Students will be able to evaluate the contributions of history in the development of our current public health system. ^ Students will be able to explain how public health complements nursing professions. ^ Students will be able to identify a minimum of 5 contributions to improving the health of the public that are a direct result of health education and information and analyze their effectiveness.
ANAT 10BIntroductory Human Physiology^ Acquire laboratory-generated data and perform statistical analyses within the framework of the scientific method. ^ Analyze EKG data. ^ Compare and contrast normal physiology and pathophysiology observed in specific disease states. ^ Demonstrate the ability to describe key interactions between organ systems including acid/base regulation, fluid balance, and metabolic regulation. ^ Determine the number of ATP produced in the complete aerobic respiration of either a triglyceride, a simple sugar, or any combination thereof. ^ Evaluate case studies by applying physiological principles on a molecular, cellular, organ, and systems level. ^ Explain the mechanisms of cellular, cardiopulmonary, neuromuscular, sensory, digestive, renal, and reproductive physiology, and the regulation of these mechanisms. ^ Predict the outcome of laboratory exercises according to concepts, principles, and laws discussed in the course.
BIOL 20Marine Biology^ Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily live ^ Students will be able to analyze the limiting factors of oceanic provinces. ^ Students will be able to compare and contrast the geological, physical, and chemical aspects of the marine environment and explain how marine organisms adapt to each aspect. ^ Students will be able to describe two major differences between vertebrate and invertebrate marine organisms. ^ Students will be able to differentiate between the major phyla of marine organisms. ^ Students will be able to distinguish organisms that belong to class Chondrichthyes (fishes with a cartilaginous skeleton) form organisms that belong to class Osteichthyes (fishes with a bony skeleton). ^ Students will be able to evaluate the biological and political factors that are associated with overfishing. ^ Students will be able to explain factors that influence winds, currents and tides. ^ Students will be able to explain the process of plate tectonics and its significance in marine environments. ^ Students will be able to identify dominant invertebrates and vertebrates associated with the southern California coast. ^ Students will be able to summarize ecological principles associated with marine ecosystems.
BIOL 21Marine Biology - Laboratory^ Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives ^ Students will be able to analyze external and internal anatomy of marine organisms and describe differences in structure between various classes of marine organisms within a particular phylum. ^ Students will be able to compare and contrast the biological and physical aspects of the marine environment, and explain adaptations of marine organisms to each aspect. ^ Students will be able to differentiate between the major phyla of marine organisms based on anatomical differences discovered in laboratory dissections. ^ Students will be able to identify 5 different organisms found in the intertidal zone of southern California. ^ Students will be able to identify dominant invertebrates and vertebrates of the intertidal regions in a field situation by observing differences in distribution at different elevations above sea level. ^ Students will be able to relate anatomical structure to life style of various marine organisms, and analyze the significance of the structure and functions of organ systems to the mode of life in the marine environment. ^ Students will be able to summarize ecological principles associated with marine ecosystems. ^ Students will demonstrate an ability to recognize chordgrass, pickleweed, and salt grass and describe the elevational distribution of these plants in a salt marsh.
MICR 22Microbiology^ Analyze, using students own experimental design, effective hand washing. ^ Apply physical and chemical methods of controlling microorganisms. ^ Demonstrate how to properly use the compound light microscope, as well as know its parts, their functions, how to safely transport and clean it. ^ Demonstrate safe handling and proper hazardous waste disposal procedures for microorganisms and chemicals used. ^ Describe the physiology and genetic processes of microorganisms. ^ Diagnose specific diseases on the basis of symptoms and laboratory test results. ^ Explain the basic features of every group of microorganisms. ^ Explain the dynamics of host-parasite interaction. ^ Perform aseptic transfer techniques and interpretations of laboratory results. ^ Perform basic microbiology lab procedures using appropriate PPE required for this laboratory course. ^ Students are able to demonstrate aseptic techniques that are appropriate for the allied health fields.
BIOL 17Neurobiology and Behavior^ Students will be able to assess the costs and benefits of various behaviors such as eating seeds instead of insects or sleeping instead of looking for food. ^ Students will be able to compare and contrast proximate and ultimate causes of behavior. ^ Students will be able to construct time-activity budgets for various animal species. ^ Students will be able to correctly identify the method of training seen in an animal show and be able to apply it to determine how the behavior was trained. ^ Students will be able to describe evolutionary processes. Students will be able to correctly describe the evolutionary process and be able to explain how this process can shape the behavior of an animal. ^ Students will be able to describe how evolution could select for particular types of behaviors. ^ Students will be able to describe how the nervous and endocrine systems cooperate to generate and control behavior. ^ Students will be able to design zoo exhibits that would be appropriate for a particular animal's behavioral requirements. ^ Students will be able to evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives ^ Students will be able to evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives (area B GEO being used as course level SLO). ^ Students will be able to explain the role of cultural transmission in the behavior of animals. ^ Students will be able to more accurately identify animals after attending a field trip.
BIOL 2Plant and Animal Biology^ Students will be able to analyze the current taxonomic classification schemes and discuss how taxonomy is a work in progress. ^ Students will be able to classify plants to Family. Students will be able to correctly analyze plant characteristics and be able to place unfamiliar plants into their correct plant families. ^ Students will be able to compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and describe how they are arranged in a classification hierarchy. ^ Students will be able to compare and contrast the different taxonomic groups (bacteria, protists, plants, animals and fungi) and discuss evolutionary changes that led to their adaptive radiation throughout geological time. ^ Students will be able to complete an analysis of plant and animal interactions in relationship to their biomes. ^ Students will be able to construct cladogram. Students will be able to correctly analyze and construct a cladogram using shared and derived characteristics placing species and their characteristics in the proper positions. ^ Students will be able to define the concept of alteration of generation, and analyze the modifications that have occurred in different organismal groups. ^ Students will be able to describe animal form and function emphasizing evolutionary trends throughout the animal kingdom (including structure, function, nutrition, circulation, gas exchange, immune response, internal controls, chemical signals, reproduction, development, behavior, nervous and sensory systems). ^ Students will be able to describe plant form and function emphasizing evolutionary trends throughout the plant kingdom (including structure, function, growth, transport, nutrition, control systems, reproduction and development.) ^ Students will be able to describe the life cycles of the important phyla in detail emphasizing evolutionary trends through geological time. ^ Students will be able to discuss evolutionary changes throughout the geological time scale including topics on systematics, taxonomy, and biological diversity. ^ Students will be able to evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives (area B GEO being used as course level SLO)
BTNY 3Plant Structures, Functions, and Diversity^ Compare and contrast the anatomical and morphological differences between stems, leaves and roots. ^ Compare and contrast the reproductive structures of bacteria, algae, fungi, bryophytes, lower vascular plants, ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. ^ Discuss the importance of biodiversity and conservation. ^ Distinguish modifications of stems, leaves and roots with respect to various environmental conditions related to water and food. ^ Evaluate various theories dealing with uptake of water and food and associated transport pathways in vascular plants. ^ Examine the major lines of evolution of plants and the phylogenetic relationships from bacteria to angiosperms, including the work of Charles Darwin and natural selection. ^ Examine, monitor and analyze the growth and development of plants from seed to seed and relate deficiencies in nutrients to growth changes. ^ Identify cells and tissues in stems, leaves and roots. ^ Illustrate the ecological concept that every living and non-living thing is interconnected, with emphasis on biotic as well as abiotic factors such as soil and exposure to sun/wind. ^ Students will learn a variety of values of botanical organisms inspected in during class and determine the relevance of Botany to their daily lives ^ Students will use the Scientific Method for a plant growth project to develop an understanding for how science works. ^ Summarize the characteristics of plant communities and biomes. ^ Value plants, fungi, algae, and the natural world.
ANTH 5Principles of Cultural Anthropology^ Students will be able to analyze how anthropological knowledge and insights can be applied to current societal issues, and then be extrapolated to an analytic evaluation of humanity's future. ^ Students will be able to analyze the key methodological practices of cultural anthropology, with its major focus on pursuing ethnographic research through fieldwork. ^ Students will be able to assess the historical development of anthropology as a Western academic discipline, giving particular attention to the significant contributions and perspectives of women, minority and non-Western cultural anthropologists. ^ Students will be able to critically evaluate the dynamics of culture change (both voluntary and involuntary), and apply this knowledge to understanding the complexities of culturally heterogeneous societies. ^ Students will be able to examine the basic conceptual framework which structures the anthropological study of humanity, identifying the crucial distinctions between ethnocentrism and the practice of cultural relativism. ^ Students will be able to recognize the diversity of human cultures by contrasting comparative ethnographic information from a significant variety of world societies. ^ Students will be able to recognize the immense scope of the multi-faceted discipline of anthropology and explain the relationships between its basic areas of inquiry: physical anthropology, cultural anthropology, linguistics and archaeology. ^ Students will be able to relate how the processes in any cultural system operate by analyzing the integrated, synergistic nature of all such systems.
MICR 1Principles of Microbiology^ Be able to determine etiologic agent and identify disease given a series of original infectious diseases case studies. ^ Students will be able to contrast the metabolic processes of fermentation and aerobic metabolism, noting cycles involved, energy production and end products. ^ Students will be able to demonstrate aseptic technique and safe handling of microbial cultures ^ Students will be able to describe and accurately draw various microbes based on microscopic observations. ^ Students will be able to Describe characteristics of selected pathogens, and the diseases caused by each. ^ Students will be able to describe the course of infectious diseases, including the interactions with host defenses. ^ Students will be able to describe the role of genes, chromosomes, mutations and human manipulation in heredity of prokaryotic cells. ^ Students will be able to describe the structures/functions of external and internal components of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. ^ Students will be able to draw standard growth curves for bacterial cultures and explain factors affecting bacterial growth. ^ Students will be able to evaluate physical, chemical and chemotherapeutic agents. ^ Students will be able to evaluate the best method to control microbes in various settings (chemical, physical or chemotherapeutic agents). ^ Students will be able to evaluate the level of contamination in water, milk, specific food products. ^ Students will be able to identify an unknown bacterial organism based on results of lab procedures performed and through a miniaturized multitest system; compare findings of these two methods. ^ Students will be able to identify the fundamental concepts of immunity, immunization, immune deficiencies and immunological testing. ^ Students will be able to observe bacterial transformation by plasmid DNA and describe an acquired phenotypic trait of the transformed cells. ^ Students will be able to outline the general characteristics of viruses, prions, and viroids. ^ Students will be able to perform a molecular separation technique (gel electrophoresis) and identify a DNA source using DNA fingerprinting. ^ Students will be able to perform quantitative plating and turbidity measures to determine the number of bacteria present in a culture sample. ^ Students will be able to prepare smears, perform staining procedures and record microscopic observations. ^ Students will be able to use an immunobiotechnological procedure (ELISA) to detect a positive HIV reaction in a simulation.
HT 2Scientific Basics for Histologic Technicians^ Students will be able to define and apply scientific terms commonly encountered by a histotechnician. ^ Students will be able to demonstrate safe techniques in the mixing of chemicals. ^ Students will be able to describe federal and state safety regulations and regulating bodies as they pertain to the handling of chemicals and biological materials. ^ Students will be able to describe quality control and quality assurance procedures, and identify the role of agencies that set QC standards. ^ Students will be able to discuss ethical standards as they apply to a histotechnology laboratory. ^ Students will be able to discuss the histotechnician's interaction with ancillary departments. ^ Students will be able to explain the scientific method and apply it to histotechnology. ^ Students will be able to illustrate the use of record keeping procedures in the histotechnology laboratory. ^ Students will be able to perform calculations involved in the preparation of histologic reagents.
ANAT 99Special Projects in Anatomy^ Apply ethical standards to research and/or other projects involving human subjects. ^ Create a proposal for the project, research paper, or experiment in macroscopic or microscopic anatomy. ^ Evaluate information from a minimum of five sources (primary literature or other sources approved by the instructor) that relate to the project. ^ Implement or complete the project, research paper, or experiment. ^ Integrate information from various sources, including initial information obtained in development of the project, in a collegiate-level research paper or project report. ^ This course has not been taught recently. David Mirman will remind whoever next teaches this course that we need to develop SLOs in this course.
ANTH 99Special Projects in Anthropology^ Apply peer-reviewed sources to the project; for example, incorporating published methods into the project. ^ Become familiar with safety precautions specific to the materials being used (if relevant to the project). ^ Deliver an oral presentation with appropriate visual aids showing the results and conclusions of the project and experiences obtained. ^ Enhance proficiencies in project-related skills. ^ Establish a contract with a specific plan for completing the project, including interim due dates. ^ Evaluate peer-reviewed sources for their relevance to the project. ^ Learn and follow ethics guidelines for research with human subjects (if relevant to the project). ^ Meet self-imposed interim and final deadlines. ^ Plan a feasible project focused on one topic (such as a research method or region) from one of the regular anthropology courses. ^ Use the library to locate relevant peer-reviewed sources about the project. ^ Write a paper demonstrating understanding of the research project or activity.
BIOL 99ASpecial Projects in Biology^ Apply ethical standards to research and/or other projects involving animal or human subjects. ^ Create a proposal for the project, research paper, or experiment. ^ Deliver an oral presentation with appropriate visual aids showing the results and conclusions of the project and experiences obtained ^ Design a project, research paper, or experiment. ^ Evaluate information from a minimum of five sources (primary literature or other sources approved by the instructor) that relate to the project. ^ Implement or complete the project, research paper, or experiment. ^ Integrate information from various sources, including initial information obtained in development of the project, in a collegiate-level research paper or project report. ^ Write a paper demonstrating understanding of the research project or activity
ANTH 30The Native American^ Students will be able to compare unique qualities of culture areas and determine common traits. ^ Students will be able to describe adaptive measures related to ecological influences in each culture area. ^ Students will be able to describe Native American contributions to the world in sciences and arts. ^ Students will be able to evaluate theories of origins and genetic relationships of prehistoric Native American populations with Asian populations. ^ Students will be able to identify Native American locations on a map. ^ Students will be able to identify special problems faced today by Native Americans. ^ Students will be able to name and describe theories of origin for indigenous peoples of the America, and list specific facts that support the theories.
HT 17Work Experience in Histotechnology^ Clinical Work Experience Students will rate the technical skills of their students as above average. ^ Clinical Work Experience Students will rate the work habits of their students as above average. ^ Demonstrate good work habits by being punctual and prepared to work each day. ^ Students will be able to apply skills learned in the classroom under actual work conditions. ^ Students will be able to demonstrate correct operation of equipment. ^ Students will be able to develop a record of the types of tissue samples prepared and the number prepared each day. ^ Students will be able to evaluate accomplishment of learning objectives and effectiveness of the work site and program through portfolio updates. ^ Students will be able to follow good laboratory and safety protocols. ^ Students will be able to interview at a work site and present oneself professionally. ^ Students will be able to produce realistic learning objectives and work schedules. ^ Students will be able to recognize the role played by each professional in the laboratory, and work cooperatively as a team. ^ Students will be able to use available reference material with permission to verify and update information.