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Standard IV: Leadership and Governance

Standard IV.A. Decision-Making Roles and Processes

IV.A.1.

Institutional leaders create and encourage innovation leading to institutional excellence. They support administrators, faculty, staff, and students, no matter what their official titles, in taking initiative for improving the practices, programs, and services in which they are involved. When ideas for improvement have policy or significant institution wide implications, systematic participative processes are used to assure effective planning and implementation.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Institutional Leaders Create and Encourage Innovation

At Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC), innovation that has been encouraged, created and supported has, as its foundation, the College President who continues to develop new ways to meet the diverse needs of students, faculty, and staff. He examines multiple sources for ideas, attends conferences to make connections with national leaders and brings opportunity to the College whenever possible. Further, the President monitors state and national legislative changes, grant opportunities, and local partnership development, always watching for innovative means to enhance the rich environment at Mt. SAC. As a direct result of the President’s sustained efforts, Mt. SAC is one of 30 colleges participating in the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) Pathways Project, a national grant sponsored by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to encourage effective scheduling practices (IV.A.1-1).

Conversations at Cabinet, President’s Advisory Council (PAC) and College Master Planning Coordinating Team (CMPCT) all reflect a desire to discover and evaluate multiple opportunities for implementation of new ideas. For the President, innovation is fostered both on and off campus. For example, he provides monthly office hours where employees are encouraged to drop in for open one-on-one conversations (IV.A.1-2). Many of the attendees bring new ideas with the hope of garnering support and enthusiasm. Innovations launched during these discussions include the Climate Action Plan, the Summer Science Exploration Experiences, and the reinstatement of Valuing Opinions/Opportunities & Identifying and Communicating Employee Successes (VOICES). In September 2016, the goal of the Climate Action Plan Conference was to produce a blueprint for the Climate Action Plan that Mt. SAC needs to create (in terms of key principles). Members of the Sustainability Committee will be chosen to complete a rough draft of a Climate Action Plan that can then be circulated among conference participants and interested faculty and students for comment and suggested revisions (IV.A.1-3 pg. 2, IV.A.1-4 pg. 2, IV.A.1-5). The committee will work to coordinate sustainability efforts and activities both on campus and in the surrounding community. The Kinesiology, Athletics, and Dance Division benefits from the President’s innovation. For example, the Athletics Department looked into the use of online progress check processes to phase out its paper process that was fraught with challenges. In discussions with the College President, he supported the decision and recommended the department examine Banner functionality. In January 2014, the department scheduled a meeting with Information Technology (IT) to discuss and demonstrate Banner capabilities. In March 2014, the Academic Task Force, in its monthly meetings, discussed the overview and the planned roll out of a fall 2014 pilot. In 2014, the department implemented the use of online progress checks to student-athletes course lists and continue to use it today (IV.A.1-6, IV.A.1-7, IV.A.1-8).

The President also publicly recognizes excellence through well-established and respected programs celebrating accomplishments throughout all constituencies. Some of these include the annual Presidential Awards, which are presented at College wide gatherings. Within these ceremonies, employees, who have led or participated in innovative initiatives that resulted in College improvement, are acknowledged and honored. The College Champions recognizes any employee, department, or committee for dedication to integrity, diversity, community building, student focus, lifelong learning, and/or positive spirit (IV.A.1-9). The Eternal Flame Award recognizes an employee for dedication to College core values, such as leadership in increasing College awareness and practices towards sustainability. The Burning Bright Award recognizes an employee for going above and beyond his/her responsibility, such as community leadership in bringing the Dream Act opportunities to the College’s students. The Torch Bearer Award honors an employee who has positively impacted the College or neighboring community, such as the integrity, professionalism, compassion, and commitment the College’s head track coach brings to his students and every event he leads. Finally, the VOICES Committee, reactivated in 2010, is committed to developing, identifying, and communicating employee recognition and is integral in supporting the College Champion Award nomination and selection process (IV.A.1-10). Awardees have been valued for their diverse backgrounds as well as their accomplishments and include leaders in Basic Skills Math, Basic Skills American Language, Library and Learning Resources, Summer Bridge, and Adult Basic Education (noncredit). Each team of faculty was recognized for outstanding work in teaching and learning.

The President also recognizes innovation among students with awards such as the Student Sustainability Awards (IV.A.1-11). The purpose of the award is to encourage students to study and explore topics related to sustainability, leading to development of solutions to environmental and interrelated social problems. Awards are presented in four categories: innovative idea, artistic expression, research paper/poster, and leadership development; and the Sustainability Committee publicizes and leads the nomination process. In addition, the President has made it a point to encourage institutional excellence within the classroom. When the Honors Director and the Vice President of Instruction came to the President and asked for support for the development of the Honors College, he immediately celebrated the concept, even when the details were still to be finalized. A cohort model for honors students is growing, and students see themselves as belonging to an exciting program. The Basic Skills Committee received support for funding innovative proposals directed at increasing success of students enrolled in basic skills courses. A wide variety of proposals have been funded and rigorously evaluated during implementation. Those most successful receive ongoing funding while others were piloted and altered in order to better serve the unique needs of the College (IV.A.1-12, IV.A.1-13).

Mt. SAC meets every challenge and opportunity with wide involvement to seek creative and innovative solutions. During the Great Recession, the College collectively sought ways to reduce expenditures and increase efficiency while adhering to core values, some of which have been permanently incorporated. Examples include:

  • Shifting funding of parking officers to parking fees while postponing use of fees to repair parking lots.
  • Not replacing custodian vacancies but adopting the OS1 Custodial Program staffing standards and creating a pool of custodial substitutes.
  • Postponing district contribution to the retiree health trust.
  • Based on survey results, reducing the number of copiers, printers and faxes while establishing a standard that reduced maintenance costs.
  • Temporarily reducing budget for professional development.
  • Investing in and developing DegreeWorks educational plan and degree audit software.
  • Supporting categorical funds with general money so that state cuts would not reduce student support programs.
  • Mt. SAC’s approach to the Student Success and Support Initiative, the Student Equity Initiative, the Basic Skills Initiative, the Completion Initiative, and the Workforce Initiative.

The Academic Senate is another organization that presents annual awards for excellence and innovation. The 2016 recipients of the 10+1 Awards include the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Questioning (LGBTQ) Task Force for its leadership in establishing the LGBTQ Center, funded through Student Equity. One of the College librarians was recognized for championing the equity proposal that enhanced and re-purposed the Teaching and Learning Center into an academy focused on professional development with an equity theme. A Chemistry Department faculty member worked with students on the first campus carbon footprint evaluation. Awards for innovation include a faculty member whose advocacy for sustainability resulted in the President signing the Association of University President’s Climate Compact. Another faculty member was honored for his development of unique physics curriculum, and a mathematics faculty member received accolades for her extended office hours and dedicated support of student clubs.

The Classified Senate also has a tradition of publicly recognizing its members for leading the College towards excellence. Members are nominated by managers, faculty, and classified colleagues in ten different categories including: campus improvement, college excellence, creativity and innovation, and college leadership. Awards are presented at an annual recognition ceremony attended and celebrated by all (IV.A.1-14).

Within the divisions and departments, there is a strong sense of leadership and innovation. The Technology and Health Division Dean encouraged the Radiologic Technology program to create both a mammography program and computerized tomography program (IV.A.1-15). Within 14 months, the curriculum was written and approved. Additionally, Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration (HVACR) program faculty leadership received Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and Chief Instructional Officer (CIO) support to institute a "super-regional” HVACR collaborative, which was funded by Career Technical Education Enhancement regional funds (IV.A.1-16 pg. 3). Collaboration outside of the region is rare, but this endeavor has been successful to date; and its clear outcomes have paved the way for future collaborations of this kind (IV.A.1-17 pg. 2-3).

With this strong model of acknowledgement and support, a campus culture exists that encourages all employees to follow the President’s lead and search out innovative concepts that contribute to institutional excellence.

The College Offers Support for Taking the Initiative for Improving Practices

Both faculty and administrators at Mt. SAC receive support for improving practices through the funding of professional development activities (IV.A.1-18). The new levels of funding are higher than what existed prior to the recession-driven reduction in funding for professional development. Currently, institutional leaders support protecting the level of investment in professional development from the variances of funding cuts, although this funding has fluctuated in the past. Over the past two years, the College hired two managers to provide College leadership and support for the professional development program, added increased funding to the budget, and set aside sources to assist employees with costs of attending conferences and various training. Additionally, Mt. SAC funded Faculty Inquiry Groups for two consecutive years and are now memorialized in the Faculty Contract (IV.A.1-19). Training and implementation of distance learning course delivery learning management systems is another area in which institutional leaders have been supportive. These platforms are available to full-time and adjunct faculty in traditional and online learning environments, and multiple platforms are supported through the Information Technology infrastructure, including Moodlerooms and Course Studio (IV.A.1-20, IV.A.1-21 pg. 2). The College is currently piloting the use of Canvas, a distance learning course delivery learning management system that the College has adopted. Dual systems will begin running in spring 2017 with full adoption of Canvas expected in fall 2017.

Faculty within the Technology and Health Division are strong proponents of taking initiatives towards practice improvement. The Vice President of Instruction supported the move of the Electronic Systems Technology program, which had been low enrolled on the credit side of the house due to the limitations of the traditional schedule, to the School of Continuing Education where the program is now offered as a series of short-term vocational certificates in a compressed format at no cost to the student (IV.A.1-22). The program is fully enrolled and serving as a training ground for entry-level positions in home security and sound system wiring. A credit electronics faculty member is teaching in the program as an overload assignment and has encouraged students to make the leap from there to the credit electronics program.

Classified staff have also received support for improving practices through professional development funding. After several years, the classified staff retreat (Great Staff Retreat) was reestablished in 2016 and funding is set aside, in the year three of three California School Employees Association (CSEA) contract, to enable staff to have time and resources available to participate in professional development training (IV.A.1-23). The October 2016 board item is as follows:

Classified Professional Development Activities 20.05.3: An annual classified retreat will be funded by the District in the amount of $30,000 with the outcomes and scope determined by mutual agreement of the District and CSEA 262, including the extent of the participation of CSEA 651 and confidential employees. Participation is subject to the provisions of this Article. In the event the funds are not fully exhausted by retreat costs, the remaining funds will be used to provide skill reinforcement for the participants during the following year (IV.A.1-24 pg. 138).

Mt. SAC conducted a Classification Study to align classified job descriptions with actual work being completed. While the process took longer than anticipated, due primarily to multiple staffing changes in the Office of Human Resources (including senior leadership), the initial study is now complete and job descriptions are scheduled to be reviewed on a rotating basis (IV.A.1-25 pg. 93-116).

The Associated Students at Mt. SAC is supported in multiple initiatives by College leaders. The addition of equipment, such as microwave ovens, enhanced study facilities. The College implemented design changes into the Student Center based on student input. The Technical Education Resource Center (TERC) and the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Center were designed based on direct student input. The College provides wide variety of resources to offer services to students to help improve their learning and success. The Leadership Education and Development program helps students with time management and employment acquisition skills, library workshops focus on research and how to navigate textbooks, and the Math Activities Resource Center (MARC) and Transfer MARC (T-MARC) help students with homework and navigating technical textbooks. In the Sign and Speech Success Center, students can record and listen to their performances to improve their speeches, and the Writing Center helps students in English and other courses with their writing skills (IV.A.1-26, IV.A.1-27, IV.A.1-28, IV.A.1-29). The College recently created designated smoking areas on campus in response to a student initiated effort that began in the Associated Student Government. Employee groups followed the lead of the Associated Students; and, through the governance process, the smoking policy was implemented (IV.A.1-30, IV.A.1-31). The College is installing water-bottle filling stations in response to student advocacy, and is increasing Wi-Fi connectivity.

The Associated Students’ budget is available to students to support new student initiatives and programs. The Associated Students is recognized and supported by the College from the Board of Trustees through the President, to faculty and classified staff, who serve as student advisors and mentors. Student representation is found on the Board of Trustees, in the Academic Senate, and on College governance committees (IV.A.1-32, I.B.5-6, IV.A.1-33, III.D.5-8).

Systematic, Participative Processes are Used to Assure Effective Planning and Implementation

Participation in planning and decision making is grounded in Board Policy (BP) 3255 (IV.A.1-34). The Board embraces the concept of participatory governance, with each constituency sharing responsibility and providing expertise in the development of policies and regulations related to their specialized knowledge. Administrative Procedure (AP) 3255 further memorializes the way in which members of the College community advise the President in matters related to planning and implementation through development of policies and recommendations (IV.A.1-35).  The Academic Senate, the CSEA, and the Faculty Association appoint members to governance committees.  Importantly, a list of general goals and operating principles are outlined in the BP which provides guidance for the way in which committees will be supported by the College and work collegially within themselves.

Integrated planning is based on the principles of comprehensive, broad-based, ongoing planning and evaluation driven by the College mission and goals (III.C.5-1). All operations of the College must integrate with the current and future needs of its students, community, and employers. To accomplish this goal, the College continually focuses on the integration of its multiple planning efforts within and across departments. The Strategic Plan was improved in 2013-14 with the expressed intent of identifying and supporting initiatives that align with College goals and prioritizing efforts for accomplishing those goals. The institutional planning body, known as President’s Advisory Council (PAC), includes representatives from faculty, staff, management, and Associated Students. PAC is charged with assuring the effectiveness of ongoing planning processes by reviewing and recommending institutional planning decisions and process (I.B.5-6). PAC accomplishes this at biannual expanded PAC meetings, where reports are received from the Budget Committee and from the Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC). These reports allow for the review of planning, effectiveness, and assessment processes resulting in possible recommendations for change in the integrated planning process (I.A.3-5, I.A.3-6). PAC also assigns responsibility for specific key performance indicators for each strategic objective of the Strategic Plan to College administrators or committees and monitors the results.

Supporting the development of an effective planning process, IEC is responsible for institutional assessment, evaluation, and coordination of activities leading to improvement of institutional effectiveness (I.A.3-6). As a result of ongoing assessment of the program review process, IEC implemented changes that moved Planning for Institutional Effectiveness (PIE) from a single year view of planning to a three-year planning cycle (I.B.3-5). The form has been placed online, and data is now preloaded into the form to ensure that every department has access to indicators critical to the analysis of its particular program. Planning begins at the unit level with analyses of internal and external conditions impacting critical needs. Budget requests, based on PIE data and plans, are attached to the PIE report and forwarded to the area manager. Budget requests are prioritized at the division/manager level according to the College mission and goals and forwarded to the Vice Presidents, where recommendations are prioritized and taken to President’s Cabinet. Budget allocation decisions are made at President's Cabinet, using PIE data as justification for final decisions. When the following year's PIE is completed, units must close the loop and report on the impact of the budget allocation to assess whether anticipated impacts were accomplished. PIE is an annual cycle, beginning at the unit level and moving upward to Cabinet. Data analysis, both looking forward and back at impact, is required at every step.

To support the connection of budget and planning, the Budget Committee and IEC met several times to develop a joint planning and budget calendar (III.D.2-17, I.A.3-1 pg. 23-24). This calendar serves to integrate both processes by assuring that the timelines of each process are established so the work of each group informs decisions by the other. This shared calendar has been a major step forward in the integration of planning and budget processes and the assurance that both are being assessed on a regular basis both inside and outside of the immediately responsible committees.

Mt. SAC's commitment to effective planning and implementation is represented in the committee structure, with each committee purpose and function clearly tied to the College mission and goals and describing the role in College planning. Committees are identified by function, either governance, operational, Academic Senate, or "other." Governance committees participate in the short- and long-term planning of the College and make recommendations about rules, procedures, direction, and processes. Operational committees participate in planning of individual departments or cross-department groups and make recommendations affecting local projects and operations. Academic Senate committees focus on recommendations related to academic and professional matters, and "other" committees are designed to provide leadership in specific areas, such as scholarships, professional development, or insurance.

Analysis and Evaluation

Institutional leaders at Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) create and encourage innovation that leads to institutional excellence through the support of professional development. They support all constituents in taking initiative for improving the practices, programs, and services of the College. Systematic participative processes are used to assure both effective planning and implementation when ideas for improvement have policy or institution wide implications.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • The innovation that has been encouraged, created, and supported at Mt. SAC has as its foundation the communication coming from College leaders.
  • Faculty, classified staff, and administrators at Mt. SAC have received support for improving practices through the funding of professional development activities.
  • The participative processes that are used to ensure effective planning are found in the campus wide governance committees and groups.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.A.3-1 Strategic Plan 2015-17 pg. 23-24
I.A.3-5 AP3250 Institutional Planning
I.A.3-6 Institutional Effectiveness Committee Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.3-5 Unit PIE Reports with ISS Data 2015-16
I.B.5-6 PAC Purpose, Function, and Members
III.C.5-1 BP3250 Institutional Planning
III.D.2-17 Joint Meeting of Budget Committee and Institutional Effectiveness Committee Summary 2015
III.D.5-8 Budget Committee Purpose, Function, and Members
IV.A.1-1 Mt. SAC Pathways Participation
IV.A.1-2 President’s Office Hours
IV.A.1-3 Climate Action Plan pg. 2
IV.A.1-4 Summer Science Exploration Experience (Item #13) pg. 2
IV.A.1-5 VOICES Website
IV.A.1-6 President Scroggin's Recap of 2012-13 in Division of Kinesiology, Athletics & Dance
IV.A.1-7 Academic Task Force Committee Meeting 3-17-2014
IV.A.1-8 President's Support of Innovations
IV.A.1-9 College Champion Winners 2013
IV.A.1-10 College Champion Website
IV.A.1-11 Student Sustainability Award
IV.A.1-12 Basic Skills Committee Application Process
IV.A.1-13 Basic Skills Committee Application Rubric
IV.A.1-14 Classified Senate Excellence Awards Website
IV.A.1-15 Technology and Health Science Division Rad Tech Minutes
IV.A.1-16 Cabinet Notes 9-2-2014 pg. 3
IV.A.1-17 Southern California HVACR Collaborative pg. 2-3
IV.A.1-18 PDC Conference and Travel Expenses 2015-2016
IV.A.1-19 Faculty Inquiry Group Projects
IV.A.1-20 Moodlerooms
IV.A.1-21 Course Studio pg. 2
IV.A.1-22 Electronic Systems Technology Program
IV.A.1-23 Classified Staff Retreat
IV.A.1-24 Classified Professional Development Activities pg. 138
IV.A.1-25 Classification Study pg. 93-116
IV.A.1-26 Employment Acquisition Skills Workshops through LEAD
IV.A.1-27 MARC and T-MARC
IV.A.1-28 Speech and Sign Success Center
IV.A.1-29 Writing Center
IV.A.1-30 Associated Students Smoking Area Meeting Minutes
IV.A.1-31 Smoking Area Map
IV.A.1-32 Administration and Governance Committees
IV.A.1-33 ASC Members
IV.A.1-34 BP3255 Participation in Local Decision-Making
IV.A.1-35 AP3255 Participation in Local Decision-Making

IV.A.2.

The institution establishes and implements policy and procedures authorizing administrator, faculty, and staff participation in decision-making processes. The policy makes provisions for student participation and consideration of student views in those matters in which students have a direct and reasonable interest. Policy specifies the manner in which individuals bring forward ideas and work together on appropriate policy, planning, and special-purpose committees.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

The College Establishes Policy for Participation in Decision-Making Processes

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) establishes and implements policy and procedures authorizing participation by administrators, faculty, and classified staff in decision-making processes in Board Policy (BP) 3255: Participation in Local Decision-Making. This policy requires that governance committees, operational committees, and Academic Senate committees and task forces are structured to include appropriate representation by faculty, management, classified staff, and students when matters are being considered that are within their purview. BP/Administrative Procedure (AP) 3255 firmly establish policy and procedures authorizing administrator, faculty, and staff participation in decision-making processes. Each constituency of the College has responsibility and expertise in specific areas, and the decision-making structure is designed to bring the multiple segments of the College together to participate in decisions related to their areas of interest and expertise. Mt. SAC implements a shared governance structure that has at its foundation shared responsibility and collaboration. AP 3255 includes the same language as BP 3255 (IV.A.1-43, IV.A.1-44). Additionally, the Annual Review of Committee Purpose, Function, and Membership ensures participation from all constituent groups. Each policymaking body has goals and a purpose and function statement that detail how ideas are brought forward and how people work together on the policy for which they are tasked (IV.A.1-32).

The Mt. SAC committee structure is made up of multiple types of groups, each with a different role. Governance committees participate in short- and long-term global planning at the College and make recommendations about rules, procedures, direction, and process. Examples include Budget Committee, Technology Advisory Committee and Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC).  All governance committees bring recommendations forward to President’s Advisory Council (PAC) where they are vetted. If all parties at the table agree, PAC sends recommendations to appropriate operational committees for action, and policy changes are implemented. If any constituency, including Academic Senate, Faculty Association, or classified unions, feels it needs more time to examine an issue and make separate recommendations, the item is pulled and later returned to PAC with a recommendation from the interested group. The agenda for each PAC meeting lists the BPs and APs under review by constituent groups with a current progress update. The work of PAC assures all constituencies’ full participation in decision-making (IV.A.2-1, IV.A.2-2).

Operational committees are also part of the governance structure, and members participate in planning of individual departments or cross-department groups and make recommendations affecting local projects and operations. For example, the Employee Wellness Committee focuses on campus wide efforts to support employee health, and the Facilities Advisory Committee reviews future project plans and on-going construction timelines, ensuring that all impacted departments are aware of plans and opportunities.

The Academic Senate maintains multiple committees, all directly related to academic and professional matters. The Curriculum and Instruction Council (C&I), the Educational Design Committee (EDC), and the Distance Learning Committee work together to review and forward all new and revised curriculum to the Board of Trustees. The Student Equity Committee and the Student Preparation and Success Council (SP&S) shepherded development of the Student Equity Plan and the Student Success and Support Plan (SSSP) and now oversee effective implementation and assessment of each plan. Academic Senate committees and councils report to the full Academic Senate on a regular basis (II.B.1-7).

When a group is assembled to accomplish a specific charge that has a specific deadline, Mt. SAC identifies the group as a task force. Membership varies depending on the issue being addressed. Recently, the Academic Senate convened task forces to make recommendations regarding restructuring the new faculty seminar, establishing a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Questioning (LGBTQ) Center, and consulting on the processes developed for dual enrollment programs (IV.A.2-3, IV.A.2-4). In fall 2016, the new faculty seminar is in place, the LGBTQ Center opened its doors, and the dual enrollment processes are being refined as the first pilot class is in place. PAC formed a Workplace Bullying Task Force which has provided regular reports and continues to meet (IV.A.2-5, IV.A.2-6. pg. 2). Members of each task force are selected for their expertise and availability to work in a timely and focused manner and may include appointees from the Academic Senate, Faculty Association, classified staff, and administration. Additionally, if the charge of the task force includes issues related to students, the Associated Students appoints a student or students to the task force. Currently, the Ethnic Studies/Social Justice Degree Task Force has student members.

The College has Provisions for Student Participation and Consideration of Student Views

BP/AP 3255 also firmly establish policy and authorize student participation in decision-making processes. Students share responsibility and opportunity for developing and recommending policy through committee representation and collaboration with administrators, faculty, and staff. The College relies on the voice of student members on committees to convey their interests and expertise. Student representatives have successfully led the College to implement smoking areas on campus, establish a Veteran’s Center, install water bottle refilling stations, increase access points for Wi-Fi, and establish extended library hours, initially during finals weeks and now on-going on Sundays (IV.A.2-7). Students were central in the establishment of the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Center and the Technical Education Resource Center (TERC), providing input on the type of services they needed in each center and what kind of furniture would best meet their needs. A blend of tutoring, project-based learning, academic advisement, and faculty consultation are available at each center in response to student input (IV.A.2-8, IV.A.2-9).

The Manner in which Ideas are Brought Forward and Worked on Together is Specified

PAC is the primary planning body for the College and strives to provide long-term stability and success for the institution. PAC provides a forum to review and recommend College direction and focus consistent with the College mission and goals. Governance committees make regular reports, share data analysis and outcomes, and receive direction from PAC. The Accreditation Steering Committee reports on-going efforts to complete the Institutional Self Evaluation Report, and the Professional Development Committee keeps PAC apprised of issues and events within classified, faculty, and management professional development committees. PAC members bring input forward from their constituency groups. When the College mission was revised, members asked their peers to review the language and brought feedback for consideration (IV.A.2-10 pg. 5). When BP/APs are reviewed and revised, faculty gather input from either Academic Senate or Faculty Association leadership, and both the classified union and Classified Senate do the same. As the College developed the Strategic Plan, PAC assumed leadership in review and approval, again assuring that all voices had been considered.

Twice annually, Expanded PAC meets to review issues that impact the entire College; membership expands to included committee chairs and constituent leaders, and the meeting is open to all. At the spring 2016 meeting, members of Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC) shared the revisions and improvements made to the PIE forms. PAC members made additional suggestions and supported IEC proposals. Progress on the Strategic Plan was reviewed, and IEC demonstrated how managers can now report data on key performance indicators (KPIs) directly to TracDat using their PIE forms. This increases time on data analysis and discussion while reducing time spent on data input. The new American College and University Presidents Climate Committee (ACUPCC) reviewed progress on green initiatives on campus (IV.A.2-11 pg. 2).

All of this consultative work is governed by BP 3050, the Institutional Code of Ethics. All employees are held to the standard of honest and equitable behavior, which leads to credibility within interactions. Employees are expected to exhibit openness and reliability in their actions as educational leaders. Students are also expected to abide by ethical behavior and decision-making. Guiding principles for all include:

  • The responsibility to provide and protect student access to the educational resources of the College.
  • To develop a climate of trust and mutual support.
  • To foster openness by encouraging and maintaining two-way communication (A.13-5).

The established policy that provides more detail regarding the work done by employees to impact decision making is AP 2410: Process for Revision of APs or BPs (I.B.7-1). The cover sheet for all AP and BP revisions has a signature line for employee groups. Academic and professional matters are determined by the Academic Mutual Agreement Council (AMAC) which includes the Vice Presidents of Instruction and Student Services, and the Academic Senate President and Vice President.

The classified unions and the Faculty Association determine if proposed changes require negotiation for implementation.

Special Purpose Committees are Gathered When Needed

As mentioned above, Mt. SAC is deliberately organized to provide input for all constituency groups in the ongoing decision-making processes of the College. When short-term, immediate issues arise that cannot be managed within the existing committee and council structure, task forces or work groups are gathered to address those unique items.
Membership is based on expertise and availability, as the task force has a specific deadline for completion and is disbanded upon conclusion. When special purpose committees are formed, documentation of their membership and their purpose and function statements are available in both the President’s office and the Academic Senate office. Mt. SAC frequently convenes task forces to work on specific short-term projects or issues.

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) establishes and implements policies and procedures authorizing all constituents’ participation in decision-making processes. These policies make provisions for student participation and consideration of student views in those matters in which students have a direct and resonant interest. Policies specify the manner in which individuals bring forward ideas and work together.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Mt. SAC has a strong shared governance structure that enables the College to make good, sound decisions.
  • Professional development was defunded during the most recent recession, but through the governance process, it has been reintroduced to meet the needs of faculty, classified staff, and managers.
  • The need for a reclassification study was considered and agreed upon within governance conversations. The study has now been completed and regular review of job descriptions is in place.
  • After an examination of College planning processes identified a need for improved alignment between planning process deadlines and budget development deadlines, IEC and Budget Committee worked together to develop an integrated planning calendar.
  • The Mt. SAC Student Equity Plan evolved from an inclusive process employing three campus wide teams, each responsible for a different component of plan development; the work of each team informed the other, resulting in a far-reaching plan addressing diverse and important issues.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.B.7-1 AP2410 Process for Revision of Administrative Procedure or Board Policy
II.B.1-7 Academic Senate
III.A.13-5 BP3050 Institutional Code of Ethics
IV.A.1-32 Administration and Governance Committees
IV.A.1-43 BP3255 Participation in Local Decision-Making
IV.A.1-44 AP3255 Participation in Local Decision-Making
IV.A.2-1 PAC Agenda 9-14-2016
IV.A.2-2 PAC Minutes 9-14-2016
IV.A.2-3 Academic Senate Minutes 9-1-2016
IV.A.2-4 Academic Senate Task Force Practices and Procedures
IV.A.2-5 Workplace Bullying Task Force Update 2015
IV.A.2-6. Workplace Bullying Task Force Update 2016 pg. 2
IV.A.2-7 Library Hours
IV.A.2-8 STEM Center Report
IV.A.2-9 TERC Newsletter Spring 2016 Week 5
IV.A.2-10 PAC Minutes 12-10-2014 pg. 5
IV.A.2-11 Expanded PAC Minutes pg. 2

IV.A.3.

Administrators and faculty, through policy and procedures, have a substantive and clearly defined role in institutional governance and exercise a substantial voice in institutional policies, planning, and budget that relate to their areas of responsibility and expertise.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Administrators and Faculty have a Clear Role in Governance

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) is proud of its clear and strong participatory governance structure that facilitates effective decision-making. The roles of administrators and faculty in institutional governance are established in Board Policy and Administrative Procedure, ensuring consistent membership and balanced participation. The Academic Senate is relied upon for leadership in academic and professional matters. It provided leadership and vision as faculty developed and submitted Associate Degrees for Transfer (ADT). Mt. SAC developed more than the minimum number of required degrees, as faculty realize the value of ADTs for student transfer.

The Faculty Association (FA) and CSEA represent their constituencies on issues of working conditions. During the most recent negotiations cycle, the FA and the District updated evaluation forms to improve the important process of evaluation and established a process for routine assessment of regular and effective contact in distance learning courses. CSEA took a leadership role in the recent job reclassification study, representing their membership throughout the process to ensure individuals were fairly considered as recommendations were developed.

Instructional managers analyze enrollment trends, work with department chairs to develop student-friendly schedules, and use data in increasingly sophisticated ways to conduct enrollment management. Student Services managers serve identified target populations of students demonstrating cultural competence and program expertise, resulting in students feeling welcome and engaged in special programs embedded within the large College environment. Information Technology (IT) leaders respond to College wide immediate needs and plan for future demand.

Providing the underpinning for the ability to significantly contribute with substantial voices to the workings of the College, professional development for all groups, classified, faculty and management, was reimagined and refunded with leadership and money available to plan and implement strong professional development programs for all groups.

While middle managers are the implementers of plans and policies, senior managers provide strategic leadership. Examples include, the revision of the Strategic Plan with leadership from the President, Student Success and Support Plan (SSSP) and Student Equity plan development led by the Vice President of Student Services, and supported by the Vice President of Instruction, Budget development and facilities planning led by the Vice President of Administrative Services, hiring and personnel issues focused under the purview of the Vice President of Human Resources, and the Vice President of Instruction facilitating integrated planning, Pathways, and enrollment management. (IV.A.3-1, IV.A.1-43, IV.A.1-44, IV.A.3-2, IV.A.3-3, III.C.5-1, I.A.3-5).

Administrators and Faculty have a Substantial Voice in Policies, Planning, and Budget

The substantial voice of administrators and faculty in planning and budget, as required in Board Policy (BP)/Administrative Procedure (AP) 3255, is exercised by their service on councils and committees involved in planning, institutional policy review and development, and budget. Faculty and administrators serve on President’s Advisory Council (PAC), which evaluates the work of governance committees and the College using an ongoing and systematic cycle of evaluation, integrated planning, resource allocation, and implementation, including the ongoing evaluation of processes for planning, budgeting, and accreditation (I.B.5-6).

The Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC) includes faculty, administrators, classified staff, and students who, among several functions, conduct annual reviews of the program review process known as Planning for Institutional Effectiveness (PIE). This review assesses the institution's progress toward its goals and yields recommendations regarding either the creation of new or revision of existing College goals. Administrators, faculty, and
staff, as required by AP 3250, participate in unit-level planning. Expanded PAC, which includes members of PAC, IEC, and the Budget Committee, meets twice a year to review and make recommendations for institutional planning (I.A.3-5).

The College budget is developed using an established process approved by the College’s Budget Committee, on which administrators, faculty, classified staff, and students serve, according to AP 6200: Budget Preparation (III.D.5-7). Both administrators and faculty are involved in annual department and unit-level budgeting. This includes PIE planning in which a process of data analysis is used in future planning. These unit-level documents are forwarded and summarized at the division/manager level and are included in the Vice President’s summary. Additionally, requests for new faculty positions are analyzed in the PIE documents, requested by a department/unit, forwarded to the Vice President of Instruction, mutually agreed upon at AMAC in the development of a prioritization list, and sent to the President, who approves the number of faculty positions to be hired (III.A.2-3).

Analysis and Evaluation

Administrators, faculty and staff at Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) maintain policy and procedures to ensure a substantive and clearly defined role in governance and a substantial voice in policies, planning, and budget that relate to their areas of responsibility and expertise

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Mt. SAC defines the substantive roles of administrators and faculty in institutional governance.
  • The substantial voice of administrators and faculty in planning and budget, as
    required in both AP/BP 3255, is exercised by their service on councils and committees involved in planning, institutional policy review and development, and budget.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.A.3-5 AP3250 Institutional Planning
I.B.5-6 PAC Purpose, Function, and Members
III.A.2-3 AP7120 Recruitment and Hiring Faculty
III.C.5-1 BP3250 Institutional Planning
III.D.5-7 AP6200 Budget Preparation
IV.A.1-43 BP3255 Participation in Local Decision-Making
IV.A.1-44 AP3255 Participation in Local Decision-Making
IV.A.3-1 Enrollment Management Deans Dashboard
IV.A.3-2 BP4220 Standards of Scholarship, Progress, Probation and Dismissal
IV.A.3-3 AP4220 Standards of Scholarship, Progress, Probation and Dismissal

IV.A.4.

Faculty and academic administrators, through policy and procedures, and through well-defined structures, have responsibility for recommendations about curriculum and student learning programs and services.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

The College has Procedures and Structures for Faculty Curriculum and Student Learning Programs and Services Recommendations

The curriculum approval process at Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) is established to ensure high quality, relevant, current, transferable, (when appropriate), and regularly evaluated curriculum by relying primarily on the input of faculty. Faculty in each discipline create, modify, and review curriculum, including courses and programs. Department chairs ensure that curriculum development procedures are followed regarding Planning for Institutional Effectiveness (PIE), including department discussions of need and budget and consideration of advisory committee recommendations, when appropriate. Curricular changes are then submitted to the Division Dean for review and input.

As prescribed by California regulations, curriculum, educational program development, and policies regarding student preparation and success must include collegial consultation between administrators and faculty. Mt. SAC’s Board Policy (BP) 3255: Participation in Local Decision-Making honors these regulations by primarily relying upon faculty, through the Academic Senate, for decisions and policy regarding these three matters. The curriculum recommendation process uses two Academic Senate committees: Educational Design Committee (EDC) and Curriculum and Instruction Council (C&I). Both committees are composed of a majority of faculty members, with the EDC ensuring representation from each academic division and C&I including faculty representatives serving in critical roles (articulation officer, outcomes coordinator, curriculum coordinator, Academic Senate President). Each committee also includes critical academic administrators such as the Vice President of Instruction and the Dean of Enrollment Management. EDC and C&I report curriculum decisions and make policy recommendations to the Academic Senate. Recent recommendations include revision to the standalone course policy, policies for adapting to modified state repeatability guidelines, and guidelines for mediating content overlap between disciplines. Student learning programs (degrees and certificates) are approved through a similar process. Policy regarding degrees and certificates is included in BP 4100 Graduation Requirements for Degrees and Certificates, which states, “The College President/CEO, in consultation with the Academic Senate, shall establish procedures to determine degree and certificate requirements and to assure that graduation requirements are published in the College’s catalog and included in other resources that are convenient for students.” Both policies regarding curriculum and degrees and certificates (AP 4020 and BP 4100) are regularly reviewed and updated by the Academic Senate and other campus governing bodies, most recently in spring 2016.

In spring 2016, the Academic Senate voted to amend the curriculum approval process. Curriculum is now reviewed by EDC, accepted by C&I and then sent directly to the Board of Trustees for approval. This change entrusts EDC and C&I to thoroughly consider all curriculum and reduces the time needed for approval of the curriculum proposal and scheduling of new programs and courses (I.B.1-33, IV.A.4-1 pg. 7, IV.A.4-2).

The Academic Senate continues to receive curriculum reports from the curriculum liaison, the co-chair of C&I. The curriculum liaison provides direction and information regarding curriculum items being presented to the Board of Trustees.

The College has a Policy for Faculty Curriculum and Student Learning Program and Services Recommendations

The Mt. SAC Academic Senate has established a robust and thorough curriculum approval process through BP 4020 and AP 4020: Program and Curriculum Development to govern faculty making recommendations about curriculum (IV.A.4-2). Discipline faculty originate course content or modifications in the WebCMS system and submit them to their academic administrator for revision and approval. From this step, the curriculum proceeds to the aforementioned faculty committees. The genesis of curriculum in discipline faculty, coupled with the support and supervision of academic administrators ensures that Mt. SAC’s curriculum process is participatory, structured, and guided by those with area expertise.

The faculty curriculum liaison is appointed by the Academic Senate and serves as co-chair of the EDC and C&I (I.B.1-32). The purpose and function statements of these groups specify the roles of the members and identify the faculty positions that exist on each (I.B.1-33). The purpose of the C&I is to make recommendations about educational design and delivery policies and procedures to the Academic Senate. C&I now makes recommendations directly to the Board of Trustees. Policies and procedures regarding student learning services are also determined through the College committee and governance structures. These recommendations are made by Student Preparation and Success Council (SP&S), which receives recommendations from three subordinate committees (Basic Skills Coordinating Committee, Student Equity Committee, and Student Success and Support Plan (SSSP) Advisory Committee). Each of these committees and councils is composed of a majority of faculty members, who are selected for their expertise in the committees’ purviews. These committees also include relevant academic administrators, including the Vice President of Student Services, Director of Assessment, and Dean of Counseling. The recommendations from the committees and council are considered by both the Academic Senate and Academic Mutual Agreement Council (AMAC), ensuring a thorough review of all policies and procedures by both faculty and academic administrators (IV.A.4-3, I.B.1-51). The recent SSSP Plan, mandated by the Chancellor’s Office, established guidelines and policies for numerous student learning services including orientation, assessment, education planning, counseling and advising, and follow-up services. This plan was developed by Counseling faculty and appropriate administrators, recommended by the aforementioned committees and councils, and approved by the Academic Senate. The implementation of this plan has been supervised by the SSSP Advisory Committee and SP&S, each of which contains a majority of faculty members.

The College has a Policy and Procedural Structures for Academic Administrator Curriculum and Student Learning Programs and Services Recommendations

Academic administrators at Mt. SAC make recommendations about curriculum as stated in AP 4020: Program and Curriculum Development (IV.A.4-2). Administrators serve on all committees that review curricular changes and recommendations: AMAC, C&I, and EDC. The Associate Vice President, Instructional Services serves as co-chair of EDC, and the Vice President of Instruction co-chairs C&I (I.B.1-33, I.B.1-32). Additionally, academic deans review curriculum before it is submitted to C&I. Administrators serving on the C&I make recommendations on curriculum when it reaches the council and prior to it going to the Board of Trustees (formerly Academic Senate) for approval.

Academic administrators, along with faculty, review both student learning outcome information and currency of curriculum through C&I, the Outcomes Committee and department review. The Distance Learning Committee, which also includes faculty, administrators and classified staff, ensures that well-defined structures are in place to assure quality service for students in online courses (IV.A.4-4).

Analysis and Evaluation

Faculty and academic administrators at Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) work within established policies, procedures, and well-defined structures to make recommendations about curriculum and student learning programs and services.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • The curriculum approval process at Mt. SAC allows for the input of faculty.
  • Faculty make recommendations about curriculum and student learning programs though well-defined structures.
  • It is also through well-defined committee structures that academic administrators make recommendations about curriculum and student learning programs.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.B.1-32 Curriculum & Instruction Council Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.1-33 Educational Design Committee Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.1-51 Basic Skills Coordinating Committee Purpose, Function, and Members
IV.A.4-1 Academic Senate Minutes 5-19-2016 pg. 7
IV.A.4-2 AP4020 Program and Curriculum Development
IV.A.4-3 Student Success and Support Program Advisory Committee (SSSPAC)
IV.A.4-4 Distance Learning Course Amendment Form

IV.A.5.

Through its system of board and institutional governance, the institution ensures the appropriate consideration of relevant perspectives; decision-making aligned with expertise and responsibility; and timely action on institutional plans, policies, curricular change, and other key considerations.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

The College Ensures Appropriate Consideration of Relevant Perspectives and Expertise and Responsibility

Board Policy (BP) 3255: Participation in Local Decision-Making states that “…each constituency of the College that has responsibility and expertise in a particular area shall participate in the development of policies and regulations related to that area. Such participation brings together multiple segments of the College in instances where policies and regulations affect staff across divisions and departments” (IV.A.1-43). Governance committee purpose and function statements outline the committee composition in accordance with this policy (IV.A.1-32). Faculty who serve as committee chairs or co-chairs make regular reports to the Academic Senate, maintaining ongoing and robust communication and sharing of diverse views. Faculty, students, classified staff, and administrators discuss and make determinations on all curricular issues including new and modified course and program approval for credit, noncredit, and distance learning courses and programs. Regular assessment of curricular process is also completed. Educational Design Committee (EDC) and Curriculum and Instruction Council (C&I) have student representatives who participate in discussions and are voting members. Student representatives on councils and committees also report back during Associated Students meetings, gathering input from their constituents and providing regular updates. Monthly Instruction Team meetings include all academic managers (deans, associate deans, and directors) and partners from Student Services (Deans of Counseling and Disabled Student Programs & Services). Agendized reports are received from all team members who sit on committees, again maintaining robust communication and providing regular opportunity for peers to provide input into multiple issues being discussed across campus.

The College Ensures Timely Action on Plans, Policies, and Curricular Change

Mt. SAC is unique in the sense that planning, policy, and curricular change occur annually. Policies are reviewed by President’s Advisory Council (PAC) on a continuous basis as local, state, and national conditions require. Curriculum is developed and approved regularly and brought to the Board of Trustees as needed. The current process ensures timely action on institutional plans in this manner, as flexibility exists in the Academic Senate to shorten traditional timelines in order to respond to deadlines imposed by the Chancellor’s Office. For example, the Student Equity Plan was developed quickly, yet its development involved all constituent groups (IV.A.5-1, IV.A.5-2). Evidence of how timely action on institutional plans, policies, and curricular change takes place is documented in PIE. The departmental and division PIE documents indicate the time it takes to resolve identified needs, including what has been completed and what remains to be done (IV.A.5-3).

The College Ensures Timely Actions on Other Key Considerations

To ensure that other key considerations are acted on in a timely manner, policies are in place to allow for participation on committees by constituent groups. When timelines are short, it becomes imperative to ensure that all constituencies are present as committees make recommendations and develop plans and policies. If regular members are unavailable to attend meetings, every effort is made to secure a substitute so that all perspectives are present and all voices are heard.

Analysis and Evaluation

Through its system of board and institutional governance, Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) ensures consideration of relevant perspectives; decision-making that is aligned with expertise and responsibility; and timely action on College plans, policies, curricular change, and other considerations.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Faculty, students, classified staff, and administrators discuss and make determinations on all curricular issues including course and program approval for credit, noncredit, and distance learning courses as well as writing and modifying all curriculum development and approval processes.
  • The current process ensures timely action on institutional plans in this manner.
  • To ensure that other key considerations receive timely action, policies are in place to allow for participation on committees by constituent groups.

List of Evidence

Title Content
IV.A.1-32 Administration and Governance Committees
IV.A.1-43 BP3255 Participation in Local Decision-Making
IV.A.5-1 Equity Plan Development Notes
IV.A.5-2 Equity Plan Development Presentation to the BOT
IV.A.5-3 PIE College-wide Program Analysis and Review

IV.A.6.

The processes for decision-making and the resulting decisions are documented and widely communicated across the institution.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Processes for Decision-Making are Documented

The processes for decision-making at Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) are documented in Board Policy (BP) 3255 and Administrative Procedure (AP) 3255: Participation in Local Decision-Making. Both BP 3255 and AP 3255 allow for all constituency groups to participate in decision-making that aligns with their responsibility and expertise (IV.A.1-43, IV.A.1-44).

Processes for Decision-Making are Communicated

Mt. SAC documents its decision-making in various communications that are distributed electronically to all campus constituencies. The College President regularly sends out Board Briefs that summarize action taken at the Board of Trustees meetings and Cabinet Action Notes that summarize action taken at the President’s Cabinet meetings (IV.A.6-1, IV.A.6-2, IV.A.6-3, IV.A.6-4). The College President also meets with the leaders of constituent groups to review the agendas for Board of Trustees meetings. The Academic Senate communicates its meeting minutes, including the approval of curriculum and curricular processes, via campus wide emails and has them housed on its web page (II.B.1-7). Constituent groups, as well, communicate processes for decision-making and the subsequent decisions. Each academic department has academic senators who carry information from Academic Senate meetings to their department meetings. A written report is shared at monthly CSEA chapter meetings including a summary of governance committees’ actions and activities (IV.A.6-5, IV.A.6-6, IV.A.6-7, IV.A.6-8). CSEA site representatives take information back to their respective departments from chapter meetings. Mt. SAC obtains feedback from constituent groups about how well they are communicated to about decisions. Feedback from classified staff in the CSEA units was last solicited in October 2015. The results provide a snapshot of how these employees perceive the level of communication of information (IV.A.6-9).

Analysis and Evaluation

The processes for decision-making at Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) and the resulting decisions are both documented and communicated across the College.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • The processes for decision-making allow for all constituency groups to participate in decision-making that aligns with their responsibility and expertise.
  • Mt. SAC documents its decision-making in various communications that are distributed electronically to all campus constituencies.

List of Evidence

Title Content
II.B.1-7 Academic Senate
IV.A.1-43 BP3255 Participation in Local Decision-Making
IV.A.1-44 AP3255 Participation in Local Decision-Making
IV.A.6-1 Email with Board Briefs
IV.A.6-2 Board Briefs 4-13-2016
IV.A.6-3 Board Meetings Archives
IV.A.6-4 Cabinet Notes Website
IV.A.6-5 Conference Report 2016
IV.A.6-6 Action Resolutions 2016
IV.A.6-7 Chapter Meeting Agenda 10-19-2016
IV.A.6-8 Chapter 262 Minutes 9-21-2016
IV.A.6-9 Classified Professional Development Needs Assessment 2015 Executive Summary

IV.A.7.

Leadership roles and the institution’s governance and decision-making policies, procedures, and processes are regularly evaluated to assure their integrity and effectiveness. The institution widely communicates the results of these evaluations and uses them as the basis for improvement.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Leadership Roles are Regularly Evaluated, and the Results are Communicated and Used for Improvement

At Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC), roles are evaluated through an annual review of committees, which consists of four phases. Committees submit goals for the year, which also incorporate assigned Strategic Objectives (SOs) from the Strategic Plan. The results of the committee’s work are communicated when a completed outcomes report that summarizes progress on the previous year’s goals and SOs is submitted to the President for inclusion in Planning for Institutional Effectiveness (PIE) (IV.A.7-1 pg. 2, IV.A.7-2 pg. 14). Managers from Vice President units also report improvement and progress on SOs in their PIE reports. All progress is compiled and reported in the institutional PIE, facilitated by the Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC) and reported out at Expanded President’s Advisory Council (PAC) meetings (IV.A.5-3).

Committees also submit revised purpose and function statements each year including current membership. All reports are reviewed and approved by PAC and reported by the College President in his PIE report (IV.A.7-2 pg. 14). The goals and purpose and function documents keep the work of the College committees aligned with the College goals and objectives in the Strategic Plan. The institutional PIE summary is compiled by IEC and included in its regular reports to PAC and Expanded PAC meetings (IV.A.7-3 pg. 2). Finally, the President's Office monitors the web pages for the committees to assure that information is complete and timely. Memorandums are sent to committees from the President's Office to keep this process moving throughout the year (IV.A.7-4).

Decision-Making Policies, Procedures, and Processes are Regularly Evaluated, and the Results are Communicated and Used for Improvement

Governance and decision-making policies, procedures, and processes are also evaluated for integrity and effectiveness. There is an annual review of shared governance committees, including committee goals (IV.A.7-5). The results are communicated to PAC (IV.A.7-6 pg. 2, IV.A.7-7, IV.A.7-8 pg. 2). The results are used for improvement as each committee makes recommendations for changes to its purpose and function statement.

Procedures for the creation and revision of Board Policies (BP)s and Administrative Procedures (APs) are established in AP 2410, first adopted in 2004 and revised in 2011 (I.B.7-1). To consistently implement the procedures, the College adopted a form, Addition or Revision of an Administrative Procedure or Board Policy. Additions or revisions of BPs and APs may originate from any person or group on campus.

The College also subscribes to an update service through the Community College League of California, which monitors changes in laws and regulations and suggests BP and AP language for compliance. The League receives legal updates on policies and procedures to ensure all related BPs and APs reflect recent revisions in federal/state statutes and regulations as well as accreditation standards. This regular review process ensures BPs and APs remain current.

The current version of each BP and AP is posted on the website and contains the dates of revisions or the date of the most recent review if no change resulted from that review. The legal updates are posted on the website. All of this input is analyzed by President’s Cabinet as the initial step in the process described in AP 2410. That process utilizes PAC for review, coordination, and communication of the process. PAC agendas and minutes contain the content of the discussions and the results of the process (IV.A.7-9 pg. 3-4).

PAC members keep College constituents informed and involved. Agendas and minutes are posted on the College website for easy access. Because the BPs and APs contain the College's governance and decision-making policies, procedures, and processes, the process assures that they are regularly evaluated to assure their integrity and effectiveness and that they are communicated to the College and the community. This process allows the College to discuss and debate areas in need of strengthening and make appropriate changes.

Analysis and Evaluation

Leadership roles and Mt. San Antonio College’s (Mt. SAC’s) governance and decision-making policies, procedures, and processes are regularly evaluated, assuring their integrity and effectiveness. Mt. SAC widely communicates the results of these evaluations and uses them as the basis for improvement.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • At Mt. SAC, leadership roles are evaluated through an annual review of committees.
  • Governance and decision-making policies, procedures, and processes are similarly evaluated for integrity and effectiveness.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.B.7-1 AP2410 Process for Revision of Administrative Procedures or Board Policies
IV.A.5-3 PIE College-wide Program Analysis and Review
IV.A.7-1 PAC Goal and Progress Report: Goal 4 pg. 2
IV.A.7-2 President's PIE pg. 14
IV.A.7-3 EPAC Minutes 6-11-2014 Item 5 pg. 2
IV.A.7-4 Annual Review of College Committees Email
IV.A.7-5 Equivalency Minutes 4-27-2015 Item 3
IV.A.7-6 PAC Minutes 7-13-2016 pg. 2
IV.A.7-7 PAC Minutes 7-27-2016
IV.A.7-8 PAC Minutes 8-10-2016 pg. 2
IV.A.7-9 PAC Minutes 9-14-2016 pg. 3-4