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Data on Incoming Students:

Student Preparedness for College

Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP) Report

One way in which student preparedness for college is measured is through data extracted from the CIRP survey report. On average, 1,152 students take the survey each year. A majority of the survey takers have never attended college before. The data indicate incoming students' assessment of needs. Recent survey data indicate that although many students believe they will do well at Mt. SAC, a large portion still feels a "high need for remedial services." Over the past eight years, many students reported a need for remedial mathematics, and in 2014 the trend continued, with 48.7 percent reporting a need. However, the need for remedial writing and remedial English are on the rise as well. One-third of survey respondents (33.4 percent) reported they feel they need to enroll in remedial writing; this is the highest reported level in the past six survey years. Similarly, 26.9 percent feel they need remedial English, which is the highest reported level since 2003. In summary, the overall feeling among the incoming Mt. SAC student population is that there is an increasing perceived need for remedial services.

High School Outreach (HSO) Program

As a way to bridge the gap for incoming students, the HSO Program identifies seniors from local feeder high schools who are considering entering Mt. SAC and offers them the opportunity to participate in the Connect 4 program. This program helps participants with their transition from high school to Mt. SAC by offering assistance with completing the college application, assessment testing, new student orientation, and early registration for their incoming fall semester. The HSO program at Mt. SAC is highly successful: More than 90 percent of Connect 4 participants in 2014 and 85 percent of Connect 4 participants in 2015 successfully applied to and enrolled at Mt. SAC.

The following chart provides a comparison of enrollment rates of Connect 4 participants and Mt. SAC applicants at large (INT21).

Connect 4 Percentage of Students Applied that Enrolled chart tracks students who applied to Mt. SAC through the Connect 4 program and enrolled in classses during the fall 2014 and fall 2015 semesters.
Long Description
Figure 6. Percentage of Connect 4 Students Who Applied and Enrolled
Data Source: Mt. SAC Banner System Data Warehouse.

Participation in SSSP Core Services Among Fall Term Incoming Credit Students

As part of the Student Success and Support Program (SSSP) core services, all credit students entering Mt. SAC complete placement assessments. Overall, the five-year assessment data results are not consistent with student's perceived readiness as self-reported on the CIRP. Recent data show 43 percent of incoming fall credit students assessed in English were college ready (placed in English 1A or English 68) while 42 percent tested in mathematics were placed at college level (Math 67 or Math 100). However, 86 percent of students tested in reading were placed at college level (Reading 90 or Reading 100). These data support the need to provide students with support services that help them to feel confident in their success as they place into higher level courses than they perceive they are ready for.

The following table shows assessment placement results of incoming students in English, mathematics, and reading (INT22, INT23).

Table 14. Assessment Placement of Incoming Students*^

Placement level English 5-Year Total Number English 5-Year Total Percent Math 5-Year Total Number Math 5-Year Total Percent Reading 5-Year Total Number Reading 5-Year Total Percent
Transfer level 2,773 10.2 5,360 21.3 7,245 49.8
One level below transfer 8,926 33 5,251 20.8 5,262 36.2
Two levels below transfer 10,712 39.6 2,164 8.6 1,857 12.8
Three levels below transfer 2,527 9.3 5,485 21.8 184 1.3
Four levels below transfer NA NA 5,875 23.3 NA NA
Five levels below transfer NA NA 1,077 4.3 NA NA
Credit ESL (two levels below transfer) 525 1.9 NA NA NA NA
Credit ESL (three levels below transfer) 987 3.6 NA NA NA NA
Credit ESL (four levels below transfer) 533 2 NA NA NA NA
Referred to noncredit ESL 76 0.3 NA NA NA NA
Tested headcount 27,059   25,212   14,548  
Cohort headcount 36,294   36,294   36,294  

Note: *Incoming students include those who started at Mt. SAC in the prior summer term. ^Only those who tested in the subject test were included. Credit ESL is not applicable to Mathematics and Reading.
Data Source: Mt. SAC Banner System Data Warehouse.

In 2014, the Community College Chancellor's Office established core matriculation services to be offered to all students as part of SSSP. Overall, 83 percent of the fall 2015 incoming credit students had completed orientation and assessment, 54 percent had an active educational plan, and 36 percent had received counseling or advising services by the end of their initial fall term. In comparison to other ethnic groups, Latino students had the highest participation rates in completing orientation, assessment, and educational plans but the lowest participating rates in counseling or advising. Older students were also much less likely to participate in these core services than traditional college-age students. Incoming credit students' participation in core services provides a powerful understanding of areas of focus for College support of student success.

The following table shows the participation rate of incoming credit students in SSSP core services for fall 2015 (INT24).

Table 15. Participation in SSSP Core Services Among Incoming Credit Students, Fall 2015

  Student Numbers  Student Percentage
Completed orientation 6,440 83.4%
Taken any basic skills assessment by end of first fall term 6,430 83.3%
Had counseling/advising services by end of first fall term 2,798 36.2%
Had an active educational plan by end of first fall term 4,201 54.4%

Note: *Incoming students include those who started at Mt. SAC in the prior summer term.
Data Source: Mt. SAC Banner System Data Warehouse.

Data on Incoming Students: Student Needs

Local Employment Training Needs

Mt. SAC's commitment to serving the community has led to the development and offering of multiple opportunities, beyond credit classes, to meet employment training needs. Community Education is a self-supporting entity of the College, not funded by taxpayer dollars, which resides within the Mt. SAC School of Continuing Education. Community Education strives to provide the community access to current, affordable, and job-appropriate training through fee-based and contract education programs. Through close partnerships with contract partners from local business and industry, relevant and customized training is delivered when and where needs arise.

The Workforce Training Center (WTC) is a program within Community Education that provides customized performance-based training, assessment, and consulting services designed to assist business, industry, and other organizations to improve the quality of their products and services and to increase their competitiveness within domestic and international markets. As part of the commitment to business partners, the WTC organizes free quarterly workshops on high-interest training topics. These on-campus workshops have been successful; last year, 152 participants representing 82 local businesses took advantage of this service. The WTC consistently partners with seven local chambers of commerce. This collaboration provides valuable communication opportunities to better understand the needs of local businesses and to align WTC services accordingly. During the 2014-15 academic year, the WTC was contracted by seven different business partners to train a total of 210 of their employees.

In an effort to enhance services, Mt. SAC applied for and received an $88,419 Employment Training Panel (ETP) contract in 2014 to support the training needs of business partners who meet the panel's funding criteria. Three local companies (Axiom Technology, K2 Motor, and AmTran Logistics) collaborated with WTC through this contract to train 97 of their employees. Training areas included: leadership, business writing, Microsoft Excel, Six Sigma, presentation skills, team building, and lean management. The 2014 contract was closed in March 2016, and a new ETP contract was approved in April 2016 for the amount of $205,382. This additional funding will enable the College to continue important work in serving workforce training needs.

Mt. SAC is the recipient of a statewide Technical Assistance Provider (TAP) for Contract Education grant, funded by the California Community College Chancellor's Office. Through this grant, TAP provides guidance and technical assistance at the local, regional, and statewide levels in order to expand and improve contract education for employers and promote student success. Important activities include: regularly updating the Contract Education Handbook; collaborating with the ETP on critical proposals that address the ever-changing needs of the state; participating in industry and workforce councils and local and state Workforce Development Boards meetings; establishing mentor/mentee relationships among veterans and novice contract education programs; developing guidance documents and toolkits for contract education programs; delivering professional development in a variety of formats; engaging employers; and promoting contract education among community college CEOs.

In addition to these contract and fee-based initiatives to support employment training needs, Mt. SAC addresses employer needs through its various CTE programs (Section 11: CTE Programs).

Mt. SAC is also an active partner with the San Gabriel Valley Economic Partnership (SGVEP), a regional, non-profit corporation supported and directed by its members and committed to the continued successful economic development of the San Gabriel Valley. Mt. SAC's President and CEO William Scroggins is a member of the SGVEP's Board of Directors. Mt. SAC employees also sit on various SGVEP industry sector councils and committees, which unite leading industries in the San Gabriel Valley to understand their needs and implement solutions.

Transfer Education Needs

Mt. SAC is part of the Career Pathways Consortium that is funded by a Carl Perkins Career and Technical Education Act grant. As part of this consortium, Mt. SAC serves ten unified school districts and three Regional Occupational Programs (ROPs) within the district boundaries. The work of the Career Pathways grant is to provide a connection between the College and local high schools or ROPs. This work is accomplished through the College articulation process, which allows students enrolled in specific CTE courses to seek college credit for work completed in high school. Articulation provides a streamlined path for students who complete a program of study in high school and wish to continue on that path at the community college.

Since fall 2001, the Articulation Program has served 9,399 students, with a total of 6,805 of them having completed their articulated course. Of the 9,399 students in the Articulation Program database, 2,443 students took 36,485 additional credit classes, demonstrating the positive impact of the articulation program on subsequent student enrollment in college classes. The top 15 subjects of courses most often taken by students outside the Articulation Program are general education courses, with English as the course most frequently taken. The Articulation Program students who took additional credit courses were successful in those courses 72 percent of the time. Only 11 percent received grades of "W" for withdrawing or an "I" for incomplete in those classes. Degree and certificate attainment is a common measure of student success. A search for the degree and certificate attainment of former students of the Articulation Program was conducted on June 22, 2015, using the services of the National Student Clearinghouse. While not every former participant was accounted for, a total of 746 students were found to have been awarded 991 degrees, credit certificates, and noncredit certificates. More than one-quarter (27 percent) of former Articulation Program students with a record of attaining a degree or certificate have done so at Mt. SAC.

Table 16. Former Mt. SAC Articulation Program Students' Awards

Degree/Certificate Type – Attained Between June 5, 2001, and May 28, 2015 Number Awarded
Associate's Degree 300
Bachelor's Degree 403
Credit/Non-credit Certificate 171
Master's Degree 21
Juris Doctor 1
Degree/Certificate type not reported 96
TOTAL 991

Data Source: The Articulation Program Report 2015.

Data on Incoming Students: Basic Skills and/or ESL Needs

Please refer to the aforementioned section on Basic Skills and English as a Second Language programs for a description of the basic skills and ESL needs of incoming students.

Data on Incoming Students: Student Educational Goals

The majority of students who come to Mt. SAC in the fall semester have a specific educational goal to earn an associate degree and/or transfer to a four-year institution (74.8 percent). The percentage of students focusing on these two educational goals has steadily increased over the past five years (INT25).

Table 17. Educational Goals of Fall Term Incoming Credit Students*

Educational Goal Fall 2011 Number Fall 2011 Percent Fall 2012 Number Fall 2012 Percent Fall 2013 Number Fall 2013 Percent Fall 2014 Number Fall 2014 Percent Fall 2015 Number Fall 2015 Percent
Obtain associate degree & transfer 3,506 50.5 3,493 52.7 4,044 54.3 4,162 55.1 4,499 58.3
Transfer 1,040 15 948 14.3 1,000 13.4 1,077 14.2 1,032 13.4
Undecided 690 9.9 628 9.5 623 8.4 594 7.9 550 7.1

Note: *Fall term incoming credit students includes students who started during the prior summer term.

Data Source: Mt. SAC Banner System Data Warehouse.

Data on Enrolled Students: Full-time/Part-time Student Enrollment

"The mission of Mt. San Antonio College is to support all students in achieving their educational goals in an environment of academic excellence. Specifically, the College is committed to providing quality education, services, and workforce training so that students become productive members of a diverse, sustainable, global society. The College pledges to prepare students for lifelong learning through the mastery of basic skills, the achievement of associate degrees and certificates, and the completion of career and transfer pathways. The College will carry out this commitment by providing an engaging and supportive teaching and learning environment for students of diverse origins, experiences, needs, abilities, and goals. The College is dedicated to serving our community through improving economic achievement, advancing civic engagement, enhancing personal well-being, promoting critical thinking, and enriching aesthetic and cultural experiences."

To accomplish the mission, Mt. SAC programs are designed to provide students access to educational programs with schedule options that meet their needs. Examination of student enrollment numbers from a full-time versus part-time perspective has shown that over half of students (both credit and noncredit) are enrolled on a part-time basis, with students taking fewer than 12 units per semester. This has been the trend for the past five years, with full-time students comprising approximately 30 percent of the total population and non-credit students approximately 20 percent.

The following table provides the distribution of Mt. SAC students by full-time/part-time status for fall 2015.

Table 18. Mt. SAC Full-time/Part-time Student Enrollment, Fall 2015

Student Number Percent
Part-time total 18,739 52.6
Full-time total 10,493 29.5
Noncredit total 6,374 17.9
TOTAL 35,606 100

Data Source: CCCCO Data Mart.

A deeper look into the enrollment trends of full-time versus part-time students by other demographic factors finds students of both groups to be surprisingly similar. The majority of both part-time and full-time credit students are under the age of 24. However, the majority of noncredit students enrolled at Mt. SAC are over the age of 50 and participate in the Mt. SAC School of Continuing Education Older Adults Program. In keeping with the College's overall data, the largest ethnic group represented within the part-time, full-time, and noncredit student populations of Mt. SAC students is Hispanic/Latino. An examination of gender by part-time, full-time, and noncredit status shows that, over the past five years, females have higher enrollment numbers than males (INT26).

Data on Enrolled Students: Annual Growth/Decline in Headcount Enrollment

During the recession, Mt. SAC headcount enrollment declined. However, with the return of economic stability, Mt. SAC began to demonstrate a positive growth rate trend in headcount enrollment. The following chart shows a growth rate of 5.5 percent from 2013-14 to 2014-15 (INT27).

The Annual Growth/Decline in Headcount Enrollment chart shows the number of unduplicated students enrolled at Mt. SAC every academic year from 2011 to 2015.
Long Description
Figure 7. Annual Headcount
Note: Chart does not start at zero to allow for better visualization of data.
Data Source: CCCCO Data Mart.

Data on Enrolled Students: Course Completion

Credit Course Completion Rates by Age

When looking at success rates by age, older groups (over the age of 30) generally show higher rates of course completion, at above 70 percent. The following table shows the course completion rate by age group for fall 2015 (INT28).

Table 19. Credit Course Completion Rates by Age, Fall 2015

  Success Rate
1-17 71.00%
18-19 66.60%
20-24 66.60%
25-29 68.20%
30-34 70.60%
35-39 72.30%
40-49 73.80%
50+ 73.70%
TOTAL 67.50%

Data Source: CCCCO Data Mart.

Credit Course Completion Rates by Gender

Course completion rates among credit students have decreased slightly over the past five years, with this pattern more pronounced for male students. The following chart shows the five-year trend in course completion by gender (INT29).

The Credit Student Success Rates by Gender chart tracks the success rates by gender at Mt. SAC from fall 2011 to fall 2015.
Long Description
Figure 8. Credit Student Success Rates by Gender
Note: Chart does not start at zero to allow for better visualization of data.
Data Source: Mt. SAC Banner System Data Warehouse.

Credit Course Completion Rates by Race/Ethnicity

The success rates across ethnic groups have remained generally consistent from fall 2011 to fall 2015. The success rate has been especially high for the Asian and white non-Hispanic groups, while American Indian/Alaskan Native, African-American, and Pacific Islander students demonstrate the lowest success rates. Student success programs such as ASPIRE, Arise, and the Title V: Developing Hispanic-Serving Institutions grant seek to increase the academic success of these students through targeted support and intervention strategies.

The following table shows the course completion rate by race/ethnicity for fall 2015 (INT30).

Table 20. Course Completion Rates by Race/Ethnicity, Fall 2015

Ethnicity Success Rate
African-American 60.00%
American Indian/Alaskan Native 59.60%
Asian 77.10%
Hispanic/Latino 63.80%
Multi-ethnicity 68.20%
Pacific Islander 60.30%
Unknown 67.60%
White, Non-Hispanic 73.70%
TOTAL 67.50%

Data Source: CCCCO Data Mart.

Credit Course Completion Rates by Delivery Mode

Mt. SAC offers a variety of instructional delivery modes, including face-to-face, online, and hybrid courses. Mt. SAC defines "success rates at census" as the point in time when Banner captures students who are still enrolled in classes, as opposed to students who dropped after the add/drop period and before the census date. That number is the denominator for calculating success rates. "Success" rates are defined as students earning a passing grade of D or higher, excluding F, W (withdrawal), or I (incomplete).

Overall, student success rates in hybrid courses tend to be lower than face-to-face courses; student success in online courses has been increasing (Fall 2011-Fall 2015 data see below).

Table 21. Success in Hybrid, Online, and Traditional Courses

Fall Hybrid Online Traditional
Fall 2011 58.31 50.91 68.26
Fall 2012 60.45 55.80 67.42
Fall 2013 61.51 55.19 67.23
Fall 2014 59.60 57.37 65.05
Fall 2015 60.64 61.88 64.46

Data Source: Argos Report.

A closer examination of success rates in hybrid courses reveals achievement gaps by race/ethnicity. Similar to Mt. SAC's student achievement data for the Student Equity Plan, African-American and Hispanic/Latino students' success rates in hybrid courses are lower than Asian, Filipino, and white students. Compared to success rates in face-to-face and hybrid courses by race/ethnicity, all groups had lower success rates in online courses except for a one-time anomaly among Pacific Islanders in fall 2012, where the online success rate was 100.0 percent. However, the overall trend for online courses across ethnicities, including African-American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, and white students is encouraging. The Distance Learning Committee has reviewed the data and supported creation of professional development to support faculty best practices in engaging students in both hybrid and online delivery modes.

It is noteworthy that the success rates in face-to-face courses are similar between male and female students – so close that the data are virtually identical. In hybrid courses, female students showed slightly higher success rates than male students, while males showed higher success rates in the online modality than female students (INT31).

Equity Analysis of Credit Course Completion

An equity analysis of credit course completion (five-year average) by various student populations reveals the following key findings:

  • Older students have a higher course completion rate than younger students. Students in the 50+ age group perform better than any other age group, with a course completion rate of 76.2 percent. Students ages 20 to 24 have the lowest course completion rate of all age groups at 70.3 percent.
  • Female students slightly outperform male students in course completion (72.2 percent versus 70.6 percent).
  • African-American students have the lowest course completion rate among all ethnicities at 63.7%, followed by Latino (68.1 percent) and Pacific Islander (68.2 percent) students. Asian students have the highest course completion rate at 79.3 percent, followed by white students (76.2 percent).
  • Low-income students have a lower course completion rate (69.8 percent) than non-low-income students (75.0 percent).
  • The special populations of disabled students and foster youth have lower course completion rates (66.6 percent and 64.9 percent, respectively) than the Mt. SAC student average of 71.4 percent (INT32).

Data on Enrolled Students: Persistence of Students from Term to Term

Credit Persistence

The Mt. SAC ISS (Institution-set Standard) for credit persistence is defined as the ratio of students who enroll in fall and re-enroll the next fall. The three-year ISS goal of 56.85 percent for credit persistence is set, evaluated, and approved by the Institutional Effectiveness Committee. Credit persistence from fall to fall has dropped to the lowest rate in five years. The following table shows the persistence rate of credit students over the past five years. Changes in success rates historically reflect changes in the Los Angeles County unemployment rate. To demonstrate continued support for ISS and other accountability measures, the College can point to the newly developed Board Policy 3225 on Institutional Effectiveness. It requires that the College develop goals that measure the ongoing condition of the District's operational environment. The Board regularly assesses the District's institutional effectiveness (INT33, INT34 pg. 128-9).

Table 22. Fall to Fall Persistence for Credit Students

Year 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
Course Success 56.50% 57.70% 57.10% 57.10% 56.30%

Data Source: Mt. SAC Banner System Data Warehouse.

The Unemployment and Course Success Rate chart tracks the unemployment rates in Los Angeles County and the course success rates of Mt. SAC students.
Long Description
Figure 9. Unemployment and Course Success Rate
Data Source: Mt. SAC Banner System Data Warehouse.

Noncredit Persistence

The ISS for noncredit persistence is measured differently than credit persistence because noncredit programs are often designed to meet a student's short-term needs, with the goal to quickly transition students out of the program and into the workforce or into college-level courses. The ISS for noncredit persistence is defined as the ratio of students who enroll in fall and re-enroll the following spring. The ISS goal of 53.73 percent for noncredit persistence is set, evaluated, and approved by the Institutional Effectiveness Committee. Noncredit persistence is at its highest rate in the last six years. Data for fall 2013 to spring 2014 is unavailable due to a data coding issue.

The following table shows the persistence rate of noncredit students over the past five years.

Table 23. Fall to Spring Persistence for Noncredit Students

Year 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
Persistence 50.00% 52.60% 51.10% * 53.40%

Note: *Data for fall 2013 to spring 2014 is unavailable due to a data coding issue.
Data Source: Mt. SAC Banner System Data Warehouse.

The Noncredit Persistence chart tracks the persistence rate of noncredit students from the 2009-2010 to 2014-2015 academic years and the compares the data to the goal of 53.7%.
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Figure 10. Noncredit Persistence from Fall to Spring
Note: Chart does not start at zero to allow for better visualization of data.
Data Source: Mt. SAC Banner System Data Warehouse.

Data on Enrolled Students: Student Progression to the Next Course in a Sequence of Courses/Next Level of Course

Mt. SAC uses multiple measures to assess student and program success. One consideration is the progression rate to the next course in a sequence by students who have passed the prior course. This is an especially important perspective in evaluating student transition from basic skills into college-level courses. Student support programs such as Pathways to Transfer, Pathways to General Education, and Bridge are specifically designed to increase student progression through mathematics and English courses by providing students with a unique opportunity to complete their mathematics and English requirements in a learning community at an accelerated pace.

The following table shows progression rate for mathematics, English, and American Language (credit English as a Second Language).

Table 24. Student Progression to the Next Course in a Sequence of Courses

Student Progression to the Next Course in a Sequence of CoursesLong Description
Data Source: Mt. SAC Banner System Data Warehouse.

Data on Enrolled Students: Student Program Completion

Cohort Progression: Student Success Scorecard Cohorts

In its commitment to increase certificate/degree attainment and transfer, the California Community Colleges Board of Governors established a performance measurement system called the Scorecard that tracks student success at all California community colleges. In the scorecard, students are placed into a cohort based upon meeting initial criteria in their first term of enrollment. Outcomes for students in each cohort are then tracked for six years.

Momentum points/completion outcomes for three cohorts are available. Mt. SAC has been improving in the areas of student completion, persistence, and attainment of 30 units over these three cohorts. Overall, first-time students in 2009-10 who were seeking a certificate, degree, and/or transfer were more successful than subsequent cohorts in achieving their goal. The number of college prepared (student's lowest attempted math and/or English course was degree applicable) completed the outcomes at higher rates. Outcomes for students who enrolled at Mt. SAC "unprepared" (in need of developmental coursework) have been improving at an even higher rate. Unprepared for college is the student's lowest course attempted in Math and/or English was remedial level.

The following table shows the outcomes in completion, persistence, and attainment of 30 units for the three cohorts for which data is available (INT35).

Table 25. 2016 Mt. SAC Student Success Scorecard Cohorts

Momentum Points/ Completion Outcomes 2007-2008 Number 2007-2008 Cohort Rate 2008-2009 Number 2008-2009 Cohort Rate 2009-2010 Number 2009-2010 Cohort Rate
Completion Overall 4478 47.40% 4924 47.30% 4966 50.70%
Completion Unprepared 3535 40.60% 4041 41.70% 4041 48.10%
Completion Prepared 943 73.10% 883 73.20% 460 75.70%
Persistence Overall 4478 77.00% 4924 78.80% 4966 80.40%
Persistence Unprepared 3535 75.80% 4041 77.60% 4506 80.50%
Persistence Prepared 943 81.70% 883 84.30% 460 79.80%
30 Units Overall 4478 67.60% 4924 70.10% 4966 73.50%
30 Units Unprepared 3535 65.80% 4041 67.80% 4506 73.10%
30 Units Prepared 943 74.10% 883 80.70% 460 76.70%

Data Source: CCC Mt. SAC Student Success Scorecard.

Student Right-to-Know Rates

In compliance with the Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act of 1990, it is the policy of Mt. SAC to make available its completion and transfer rates to all current and prospective students. Transfer rates are derived from tracking a cohort of students over a certain period of time after they enroll in the College. For this calculation, a fall cohort of all certificate, degree, and transfer-seeking first-time, full-time students is tracked over a three-year period. A "completer" is a student who attained a certificate or degree or became transfer-prepared during the three-year period. Students who are "transfer-prepared" have completed 60 transferable units with a grade-point average (GPA) of 2.0 or better. Transfer students are those who transferred to another public postsecondary institution prior to attaining a certificate, degree, or becoming transfer-prepared during a five-semester period. Transfer rates do not represent the success rates of the entire student population at Mt. SAC, nor do they account for student outcomes occurring after this three-year tracking period.

These results indicate a mostly stable transfer and completion rate in the last four years of data, although transfers were reduced in the 2012 cohort. The College is providing more transfer opportunities for its students. The Student Transfer Achievement Reform Act (Senate Bill 1440, California Education Code sections 66746-66749) guarantees admission to a California State University campus for any community college student who completes an "associate degree for transfer", a newly established variation of the associate degrees traditionally offered at a California community college. The Associate in Arts for Transfer (A.A.-T) or the Associate in Science for Transfer (A.S.-T) is intended for students who plan to complete a bachelor's degree in a similar major at a CSU campus. Students who complete an A.A.-T or A.S.-T degree are guaranteed admission to the CSU system. Admission to a particular campus or major is not guaranteed; however, A.A.-T/A.S.-T students receive priority admission consideration. Students transferring to a CSU campus that accepts the A.A.-T or A.S.-T will be required to complete no more than 60 units after transfer to earn a bachelor's degree (unless the major is a designated "high-unit" major). Mt. SAC degree offerings include:

Associate of Arts - Transfer (A.A.-T)

  • Art History
  • Communication Studies
  • English
  • Geography
  • History
  • Journalism
  • Music
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Studio Arts
  • Theater Arts

Associate of Science - Transfer (A.S.-T)

  • Administration of Justice
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Mathematics

The following chart shows trends in three-year completion and transfer rates at Mt. SAC (INT36).

The Mt. SAC Transfer and Completion Rates chart tracks student transfer and program completion rates.
Long Description
Figure 11. Student Transfer and Completion Rates per Student Right-to-Know
Data Source: Student Right-To-Know Rate Disclosure Website.

Data on Enrolled Students: Certificate/Degree Completion

Noncredit Certificates

Noncredit California Community Colleges Chancellor's Office-approved certificates are earned by students who complete a sequence of courses with progress indicators of "P" for pass. Both the number of noncredit certificates and the unduplicated headcount of students earning the certificates are at the second highest level in the past four years. Headcount and certificate goals are set, evaluated, and approved by the Institutional Effectiveness Committee.

The Noncredit Certificates chart compares the number of noncredit students who have earned a certificate with the number of noncredit certificates conferred in an academic year.
Long Description
Figure 12. Noncredit certificates awarded and unduplicated number of students along with ISS goals
Note: *Data for 2009 to 2010 is unavailable.
Data Source: Mt. SAC Banner System Data Warehouse

CCCCO Approved Credit Certificates

Mt. SAC students completing credit courses in prescribed pathways consisting of 18 or more units can earn a CCCCO-approved certificate of achievement. Both the number of CCCCO-approved credit certificates and the unduplicated headcount of students earning the certificates are at the lowest level in the past four years. Institution-set Standards goals are set, evaluated, and approved by the Institutional Effectiveness Committee.

The California Community Colleges' Chancellor's Office (CCCCO) Approved Credit Certificates chart tallies the number of students who have earned a certificate versus the number of approved credit certificates conferred in an academic year.
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Figure 13. Mt. SAC Chancellor's Office approved credit certificates and goals
Data Source: Mt. SAC Banner System Data Warehouse.

All Credit Certificates (Including Small Certificates)

Mt. SAC has established ISS, via the Institutional Effectiveness Committee, for all credit certificates (including those in a "low unit" sequence of 12-18 units) and for unduplicated headcount of students earning these certificates. Mt. SAC tends to use this more inclusive definition of credit certificates for internal discussions, rather than limiting consideration to only CCCCO-approved certificates. The number of certificates has dropped somewhat from the level it was in the previous two years. The unduplicated headcount of students earning the certificates is at a four-year low.

The All Credit Certificates chart tallies the number of students who have earned a certificate versus the number of credit certificates conferred in an academic year.
Long Description
Figure 14. All Mt. SAC credit certificates awarded, unduplicated number of students, and goals
Data Source: Mt. SAC Banner System Data Warehouse.

Degrees

The Mt. SAC ISS for degrees includes the unduplicated headcount of students earning these degrees. Both the number of degrees and the unduplicated headcount of students earning the degrees are at their highest levels in the past six years. These data correlate with implementation of the Student Success and Support Program, which provides students with core services such as educational planning to encourage higher certificate and degree completion rates. This also may explain the lower levels of certificate completion, as more students are seeking degrees instead. ISS goals are set, evaluated, and approved by the Institutional Effectiveness Committee.

The Degrees chart tallies the number of students who have earned a degree versus the number of degrees conferred in an academic year.
Long Description
Figure 15. Mt. SAC degrees awarded, unduplicated number of students, and goals
Data Source: Mt. SAC Banner System Data Warehouse.

Overview: Transfer

The Student Transfer Achievement Reform Act, which guarantees admission to a CSU upon completion of the Associate in Arts for Transfer or the Associate in Science for Transfer degrees, was enacted in 2010, resulting in a growing number of Mt. SAC students choosing to pursue and complete this types of degree. Over the past four years, students have taken advantage of this opportunity for transfer, with data demonstrating a sharp rise in completions.

Over the same period of time, there has been an increasing number of students receiving Associate of Science (A.S.) degrees, and a decrease in those completing Associate of Arts (A.A.) degrees. The number of certificates awarded that require more than 18 units has remained the same throughout the timeframe; however, the number of students receiving certificates of fewer than 18 semester units has grown from 2011 to 2014.

The number of certificates and degrees awarded at Mt. SAC between 2011-12 and 2014-15 increased by 35.0 percent. The following table provides a summary of certificates and degrees completed over the past four years (II.A.6-4).

Table 26. Certificate and Degree Completion at Mt. SAC

Certificate or Degree 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
A.S.-T degree 0 1 14 26
A.A.-T degree 36 133 221 304
A.S. degree 699 782 760 831
A.A. degree 1,041 1,110 944 926
Credit certificate (?18 units) 734 845 730 664
Credit certificate (<18 units) 0 0 641 719
Noncredit certificates 1,064 1,376 1,294 1,355
TOTAL 3,574 4,247 4,604 4,825

Data Source: CCCCO Data Mart.

Data on Enrolled Students: Student Transfer to Four-Year Institutions

Student Transfer to University of California (UC) and California State University (CSU)

Consistent with the implementation of the Student Transfer Achievement Reform Act and subsequent increase in completion of Associate in Arts for Transfer or the Associate in Science for Transfer degrees, the transfer rates of Mt. SAC students to the UC and California State University's systems have increased steadily year over year. The lowest number of transfers were in 2009-2010 and 2012-2013 which was due to budget cuts to the CSU's general fund base. As a result, the overall number of transfers was negatively impacted. The following chart shows trends in transfer rates to UC and CSU (combined) over the past 11 years (INT37).

Mt. SAC Transfers to CSU and UC Combined chart shows the number of transfer students who transferred to a UC or CSU institution.
Long Description
Figure 16. Number of students transferring to CSU and UC
Note: Chart does not start at zero to allow for better visualization of data.
Data Source: CCCCO Data Mart.

Mt. SAC's two Institution-set Standards (ISS) for transfer are defined as the number of students enrolling in the UC or CSU systems. The initial ISS goals were 380 and 1,096 for UC and CSU respectively. This was based on the four-year average from 2009-2010 through 2012-2013. The long-term ISS goals based on the six-year average are 395 and 1,162. The short-term ISS goals based on the three-year average are 410 and 1,227. In 2014-15, Mt. SAC transferred a total of 408 students to UC, an increase of 26.3 percent from 2009-10. During the same year, Mt. SAC transferred a total of 1,402 students to CSU, an increase of 84.7 percent since 2009-10. The following table shows six-year trends in the number of Mt. SAC students transferring to UC and CSU. ISS goals are set, evaluated, and approved by the Institutional Effectiveness Committee.

Table 27. Mt. SAC Transfers to UC and CSU

Certificate or Degree 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
UC 323 395 426 398 423 408
CSU 759 1,350 1,180 946 1,333 1,402
TOTAL 1,082 1,745 1,606 1,344 1,756 1,810

Data Source: CCCCO Data Mart.

Student Transfer to In-State Private and Out-of-State Institutions

While the greatest majority of Mt. SAC transfers are to UC and CSU, many Mt. SAC students choose to continue their education at an in-state private or out-of-state university. Between 2009-10 and 2014-15, a total of 2,187 students transferred to in-state private institutions. During the same timeframe, a total of 1,341 students transferred to out-of-state institutions.

Table 28. Mt. SAC Transfers to In-state Private (ISP) and Out-of-state Institutions (OOS)

Certificate or Degree 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
ISP 497 468 446 417 359 469
OOS 220 256 274 293 298 325
TOTAL 717 724 720 710 657 794

Data Source:  CCCCO Data Mart.

Data on Graduates: Student Job Placement

One data element of Mt. SAC's Institution-set Standards (ISS) is student job placement. In the initial process for establishing the rate for this standard, the College used an internal survey; however, the response rate was low. For programs with few graduates, it was difficult to make ISS decisions with a small number of graduates and a small number of respondents. The resulting data did not reflect actual job placement rates for programs.

Based on discussions with the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC), Mt. SAC re-calculated its ISS using the number of respondents and not the number of graduates per program as the denominator. According to conversations with ACCJC, this calculation is more aligned with data practices of other colleges. In addition to this change in the calculation of student job placement rates, Mt. SAC decided to use an outside vendor to conduct an alumni and leavers survey. A statewide survey, the Career Technical Education Employment Outcomes Survey, provides data to participating colleges in June of each year. As such, these data will always be behind by one year in reporting. ACCJC has agreed that this is acceptable, if noted. In order to demonstrate the College's commitment to this annual report, last year's data is re-stated with both the new job placement rates as well as the revised ISS.

Below are some examples of the processes divisions used to guide these conversations to reflect on these results and determine the program-level ISS.

  • Business Division – In order to create the ISS, various factors were considered by the departments: 1) Mt. SAC Alumni survey data presented; 2) review of various websites with job announcements and requirements in the fields; 3) Advisory Committee input; 4) labor market information from the College-hosted Center of Excellence; and 5) Employment Development Department and Bureau of Labor Statistics data reflecting projected growth.
  • Technology and Health Division – For all entries, the following was used in the decision making for creating the ISS: 1) anecdotal evidence from completers and students who "job out" before completing certificates/degrees; 2) improvements to the Launchboard Program Snapshot tool should improve ability to track students who leave programs before obtaining certificates/degrees.
  • It was noted that in several traditional programs, students prepare for direct employment after graduation while in others, such as electronics technology, students prepare either for initial employment or for transfer to CSU programs.
  • Health programs used accreditation requirements for placement rate.
  • Public Safety (Fire Technology and Administration of Justice) have low employment rates due to the need for students to have both: 1) good financial credit reports, and 2) clear background checks. Students can graduate from the program without satisfying the aforementioned criteria.

The following tables provide the most recent placement rates for Mt. SAC students completing CTE certificate and degree program.

Table 29. 2013-14 Job Placement Rates for Students Completing Certificate Programs and CTE Degrees

CIP Code 4 Digits Program Institution-Set Standard Percent Job Placement Rate Percent
01.06 Ornamental Horticulture A.S. Degree 70% 50%
11.01 Intro to Computer Info Tech Certificate 15% 100%
11.02 CIS Telecommunications Certificate 20% 100%
11.02 CIS Object Oriented DSN Certificate 20% 0%
11.10 Computer Network Admin A.S. Degree 20% 100%
11.99 CIS Network Security Certificate 20% 100%
15.05 Air Condition & Refrig Certificate 60% 71%
19.07 Children's Prog: Gen I Certificate 40% 58%
19.07 Children's Prog: Gen II Certificate 40% 50%
19.07 Child Development A.S. Degree 20% 100%
19.09 Fashion Merchandising A.S. Degree 10% 100%
22.03 Paralegal/Legal Assistant 10% 60%
43.01 Law Enforcement A.S. Degree 20% 57%
43.02 Fire Technology A.S. Degree 25% 75%
47.01 Elec/Comp Engr Tech A.S. Degree 35% 100%
47.01 Elec/Comp Engr Tech Certificate 35% 0%
47.06 Airframe & Powerplant A.S. Degree 93% 50%
49.01 Aviation Science A.S. Degree 75% 25%
49.01 Commercial Flight A.S. Degree 25% 25%

Data Source: Mt. SAC Alumni Survey & ACCJC Annual Report

Table 30. 2013-14 Job Placement Rates for Students Completing Certificate Programs and CTE Degrees

CIP Code 4 Digits Program Institution-Set Standard Percent Job Placement Rate Percent
51.08 Registered Veterinary Tech A.S. Degree 70% 75%
51.09 Emergency Medical Tech I Certificate 70% 67%
51.09 Respiratory Therapy A.S. Degree 70% 71%
51.09 Radiologic Tech A.S. Degree 75% 100%
51.09 EMT Paramedic Certificate 95% 100%
51.10 Histologic Tech Training A.S. Degree 85% 40%
51.15 Alcohol/Drug Counseling A.S. Degree 60% 50%
51.15 Alcohol/Drug Counseling Certificate 60% 0%
51.16 Nursing A.S. Degree 90% 85%
52.01 Liberal Arts A.A. Business 29% 29%
52.02 Business Management Level I Certificate 70% 100%
52.02 Business: Small Business Management I Certificate 40% 50%
52.02 Business: Human Resource Management I Certificate 10% 0%
52.02 Business Management II Certificate 70% 100%
52.02 Business Management A.S. Degree 40% 40%
52.03 Accounting Bookkeeping Certificate 25% 50%
52.03 Accounting Payroll Certificate 25% 100%
52.03 Accounting Managerial Certificate 10% 0%
52.03 Accounting A.S. Degree 50% 67%
52.04 Photography Certificate 40% 0%
52.09 Hospitality & Restaurant Management AS Degree 70% 100%
52.11 Business International I Certificate 40% 50%
52.11 Business International II Certificate 70% 100%

Data Source: Mt. SAC Alumni Survey & ACCJC Annual Report

Data on Graduates: Licensure/Certification Exam

Many programs at Mt. SAC prepare students to enter directly into the workforce upon successful completion of a license or certificate. The College has established Institutional-set Standards for program licensure pass rates using individual program data. These range from 75 percent to 93 percent. The following table provides the licensure pass rates for Mt. SAC's relevant Career Technical Education programs.

Table 31. Licensure Pass Rates for Students Completing CTE Programs

CIP Code Program Exam Level ISS Pass Rate
49.01 Aviation Maintenance National 93% 100%
51.08 Registered Veterinary Technology State 75% 85%
51.09 Emergency Medical Technician National 90% 100%
51.15 Psychiatric Technician State 75% 83%
51.09 Radiologic Technician National 75% 89%
51.09 Respiratory Therapy National 80% 96%
51.10 Histologic Technician Training National 85% 85%
51.16 Nursing State 75% 86%
51.39 Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) State 85% 98%
51.10 Phlebotomy Program State 75% 93%

Data Source: 2016 Mt. SAC ACCJC Annual Report & School of Continuing Education

College Goals

College Goals are derived from the College's planning processes. The College's program review, Planning for Institutional Effectiveness, is a yearly process that provides an opportunity for reflection on achievement of the College Goals and revision of the Goals. The evidence shows the College's Goals
( I.A.1-3).