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Standard III: Resources

Standard III.A. Human Resources

III.A.1.

The institution assures the integrity and quality of its programs and services by employing administrators, faculty and staff who are qualified by appropriate education, training, and experience to provide and support these programs and services. Criteria, qualifications, and procedures for selection of personnel are clearly and publicly stated and address the needs of the institution in serving its student population. Job descriptions are directly related to institutional mission and goals and accurately reflect position duties, responsibilities, and authority.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) considers every hire a multi-million-dollar decision. The College’s recruitment and selection procedures are designed to ensure the integrity and quality of programs and services are maintained by employing diverse administrators, faculty, and staff who are well-qualified for their positions by appropriate education, training, and experience. Broadly published criteria, qualifications, and selection procedures are consistently applied to hire individuals to support student learning and achievement.

Program Review is at the Center of Hiring Decisions

College decisions to employ faculty, staff and managers are deeply rooted in the program review process (Planning for Institutional Effectiveness, PIE). Units and departments examine data and identify needs, which are prioritized at the divisional level. Faculty requests are forwarded from academic divisions to the Academic Senate and the Vice Presidents of Instruction and Student Services. Once each group completes its prioritization, a joint recommendation is developed at the Academic Mutual Agreement Council (AMAC), a consultative body made up of Academic Senate President and Vice President and Vice Presidents of Instruction and Student Services. The outcome of their joint collaboration is forwarded to the President for final review. Staff and management hiring recommendations are also based in PIE analyses. Unit/department needs move to vice presidents, who bring prioritized lists to President’s Cabinet, where funding decisions are made based on institutional goals and priorities.

Criteria, Qualifications, and Procedures for Selection of Personnel are Clearly and Publicly Stated and Address the Needs of the College in Its Service to Students

Mt. SAC is committed to assuring the integrity and quality of programs and services. The minimum qualifications for administrator, faculty, and staff positions appear in the job postings posted on the College’s employment opportunities website and other websites and recruitment sources (III.A.1-1). Minimum qualifications for faculty and administrator positions are drafted in accordance with the California Community College Chancellor’s Office Minimum Qualifications for Faculty and Administrators in California Community Colleges (III.A.1-2). Adjustments to these minimum qualifications or “equivalencies” are approved by departments and by the Academic Senate in accordance with Administrative Procedure (AP) 7211, Minimum Qualifications and Equivalencies (III.A.1-3, III.A.1-4, III.A.1-5).

The minimum qualifications for non-faculty positions (classified staff and non-educational managers) are not prescribed by the Chancellor’s Office. Beginning in 2011-12, the College initiated a process to evaluate all non-faculty positions. Koff and Associates (Koff) were contracted to provide the process by which staff and managers provided input. Classification review questionnaires were distributed to all classified employees asking for their input on their job duties. These questionnaires were reviewed by the Office of Human Resources (HR) and managers and forwarded to Koff for creation of job descriptions. Based on this input from staff and managers, Koff created initial drafts of job descriptions. The initial drafts were then returned to staff and managers for review and revision. These drafts were then moved into the negotiations process. California School Employee Association (CSEA) and the District thoroughly reviewed each set of similar job descriptions together. Once the negotiations were completed, recommendations were forwarded to the Board of Trustees for approval. The District and CSEA continue to refine this work. The initial timeline was extended beyond expectations due to changes in senior leadership in HR. Regular negotiations are a source of good practice which contributes toward where the College is today with this process (III.A.1-6 pg. 2, III.A.1-7, III.A.1-8, III.A.1-9).

HR also performs job analyses which involve a review of similar positions at other institutions. For CSEA 262 positions, newly created or modified positions are also reviewed by the union prior to posting (III.A.1-9B pg. 3). Application procedures are clearly stated in all job postings (III.A.1-10).

Qualifications for administrators are clearly documented in each management position description and also appear in job postings. The position description is used by HR and the hiring manager to jointly develop the job posting. The qualifications listed in the job posting and position description are used to assess applicants in the screening and interview processes (III.A.1-11).

Qualifications for classified staff (i.e. CSEA 262, CSEA 651, confidential employees, supervisors, and leads) are documented on position descriptions and on individual job postings. Both are retained in the personnel file (III.A.1-12).

Overall, the College mission and goals, including the needs of the students, are used to drive the College’s procedures for recruitment and hiring that are publicly stated in Board Policies and Administrative Procedures and are described on individual job postings, available on the College’s career opportunities website (III.A.1-1). Confidential and supervisory employees are hired following the process used for classified employees. The composition of hiring committees has been carefully examined to provide necessary expertise and appropriate constituent voices around the table as recommendations are made with an emphasis on addressing the needs of the College as it relates to its mission, goals, and the needs of its students. The requirements in hiring committee make-up for recruitment for specific positions are listed on the Screening and Selection Committee Composition Request Form (III.A.1-13). Hiring practices and procedures are consistent with the College’s Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Plan (II.A.7-4). The District provides regular EEO hiring training to employees, made available through Professional and Organizational Development (POD) and appearing on the POD calendar (III.A.1-14). These regular trainings assure that a trained EEO representative is available to serve on all hiring committees (III.A.1-15, III.A.1-16, III.A.1-17, III.A.1-18).

Job Descriptions are Directly Related to the College Mission and Goals and Accurately Reflect Position Duties, Responsibilities, and Authority

Job descriptions address the needs of the College in serving its student population. Descriptions are directly related to the College mission and goals and accurately reflect position duties, responsibility, and authority. The home page of the Mt. SAC online application system introduces job applicants to the College commitment to the mission (III.A.1-1). Job descriptions support the College mission and goals. The process by which vacancies are approved for posting involves consideration of how each position contributes to accomplishing the College mission and goals, with final review conducted at President’s Cabinet level. The rationale for a position usually begins in PIE. Faculty positions are prioritized following stated criteria that are addressed in rationale statements that are reviewed during the prioritization process. Staff and manager positions are sometimes identified in PIE and sometimes in Cabinet. All requests for positions require completion of a Request to Fill form which requires a rational and funding source (III.A.1-19).

Job descriptions for faculty, staff, and administrator positions are reviewed and updated by HR staff in conjunction with appropriate department personal to ensure they accurately reflect position duties, responsibilities, and authority and support the mission and goals of the College and the needs of its students. Job descriptions are provided to the employee upon hire and placed in the personnel file in HR. Position classification descriptions for staff and administrators are also accessible in HR and on the HR website (III.A.1-20). Job descriptions are related to Institutional Goal #9 “The College will provide opportunities for increased diversity and equity for all across campus,” which is outlined in the Strategic Plan and supported through strategic objectives, key performance indicators, process objectives, and outcomes objectives (I.A.3-1).

Faculty positions are reviewed by faculty at the departmental level, by the hiring manager, the appropriate Vice President of Instruction or Student Services, and HR staff each time a position is prepared for recruitment. The Academic Senate President also approves each faculty job description. Staff and administrator positions are reviewed by the hiring manager, the appropriate Vice President, and HR before posting a vacancy.

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) employs diverse administrators, faculty, and staff who are well-qualified by appropriate education, training, and experience to assure the quality and integrity of its programs and services. Criteria, qualifications, and procedures for selection of personnel are clearly and publicly stated and address the needs of Mt. SAC in serving its student population. Job descriptions are directly related to the College’s mission and goals and accurately reflect position duties, responsibilities, and authority. Job descriptions are regularly updated and revised to meet changing needs.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Criteria and minimum qualifications for faculty and administrator positions are drafted in accordance with the Chancellor’s Office Minimum Qualifications for Faculty and Administrators in California Community Colleges and appear in the job postings listed on the Mt. SAC employment opportunities website and other recruitment resources.
  • Procedures for selection of personnel at Mt. SAC are publicly stated in Board Policy 7120, Recruitment and Hiring, and in Administrative Procedures, and are also described in individual job postings, which are listed on the College’s employment opportunities website.
  • The home page of the Mt. SAC online application system introduces job applicants to the College’s commitment to the mission.
  • Job descriptions for faculty, staff and administrator positions are regularly reviewed and updated to ensure that they support the mission and goals of the College.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.A.3-1 Strategic Plan 2015-17
II.A.7-4 Equal Employment Opportunity Plan
III.A.1-1 Mt. SAC Employment Website
III.A.1-2 Minimum Qualifications Handbook 2014
III.A.1-3 AP7211 - Minimum Qualifications and Equivalencies
III.A.1-4 Discipline List of Equivalencies Website
III.A.1-5 Faculty Job Posting
III.A.1-6 President Cabinet Notes 2-3-2015 pg. 2
III.A.1-7 Classification Study
III.A.1-8 President Advisory Council Minutes 3-25-2015
III.A.1-9 Professional Development Day - Know Your Rights 2-12-2015
III.A.1-9B CSEA Review of Posted Positions pg. 3
III.A.1-10 Application Process
III.A.1-11 Management Descriptions
III.A.1-12 Confidential Assignment Descriptions
III.A.1-13 Committee Composition Request Form
III.A.1-14 POD Calendar- EEO Training
III.A.1-15 BP7120 Recruitment and Hiring
III.A.1-16 AP7121 Recruitment and Hiring Classified Employees
III.A.1-17 AP7122 Recruitment and Hiring Management Employees
III.A.1-18 AP7135 Temporary Special Projects Administrators
III.A.1-19 Request to Fill Process
III.A.1-20 Human Resources Website

III.A.2.

Faculty qualifications include knowledge of the subject matter and requisite skills for the service to be performed. Factors of qualification include appropriate degrees, professional experience, discipline expertise, level of assignment, teaching skills, scholarly activities, and potential to contribute to the mission of the institution. Faculty job descriptions include development and review of curriculum as well as assessment of learning. (ER 14)

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) ensures compliance with CA Ed Code Section 87400 Employment for Academic Positions,“…shall employ for academic positions, only persons who possess the qualifications as prescribed by regulation of the board of governors,” in developing faculty job postings and implementing its screening and selection procedures. To accomplish this, the College relies on a faculty-driven hiring process. Faculty review and recommend positions to be hired and serve as subject matter and content experts on all hiring committees (III.A.2-1).

Faculty and educational administrators are directly involved each time a faculty position is filled. At the department level, faculty job descriptions are reviewed for qualifications, duties, and responsibilities by faculty representative(s) and the Dean of the Division and updated to ensure compliance with current mandates, qualifications, and program needs. Job descriptions are further reviewed and approved by the Academic Senate and appropriate Vice President of Instruction or Student Services and forwarded to Human Resources (HR) for additional review and approval before posting (III.A.1-2, III.A.2-2).

The selection process includes the department chair and up to three additional faculty selected by the department. These faculty provide classroom and subject matter expertise in the assessment of applicants’ qualifications in the hiring process. Faculty qualifications include knowledge of subject matter and requisite skills for the services to be performed. In addition, factors of qualification include appropriate degrees, professional experience, discipline expertise, level of assignment, teaching skills, scholarly activities, potential to contribute to the mission of the institution, development and review of curriculum, and assessment of learning. Factors of qualification are stated in all faculty job postings.

Mt. SAC adheres to the statewide mandated Minimum Qualifications for Faculty Positions (III.A.1-2).

  1. Knowledge of the subject matter and requisite skills.
    The state Board of Governors determines the minimum qualifications for each discipline recognized by the California Community Colleges. Minimum qualifications are an updated listing of disciplines based on feedback from Academic Senate for California Community Colleges and its delegates. Minimum qualifications are adopted by the Board of Governors of California Community Colleges. A comprehensive review of regulations regarding minimum qualifications and disciplines list is conducted periodically to keep the listing up-to-date.
  2. Factors of qualification include appropriate degrees, professional experience, and discipline expertise, level of assignment, teaching skills, scholarly activities, and potential to contribute to the mission of the institution.

Each college may locally decide to have equivalencies that expand or limit the potential hiring pool for academic positions and also have flexibility in how they organize courses within disciplines, how to apply equivalency, as well as how to develop criteria and employ processes to select administrators and instructors. Development of local processes for applying the minimum qualifications requires mutual agreement between the Board of Trustees and the Academic Senate (III.A.2-3).

Knowledge of the subject matter and requisite skills are outlined in Mt. SAC’s Board Policies (BPs) and Administrative Procedures (APs).

  • BP 7120 indicates that faculty are hired based on the minimum qualifications per the Board of Governors’ directive.
  • AP 7120 outlines requirements and hiring practices for faculty positions.
  • AP 7210 outlines who are considered academic employees. Faculty employees include, but are not limited to, instructors, librarians, counselors, and professionals in health services, Disabled Student Programs and Services, and Extended Opportunity Programs and Services.
  • AP 7211 ensures that faculty meet the minimum qualifications established by the Board of Governors, or shall possess qualifications that are at least equivalent to the minimum qualifications set out in the regulations of the Board of Governors. In addition, for disciplines not requiring a master’s degree, all professional experience in the discipline must be occupational in nature as per Title 5, Section 53404 (III.A.2-4).

Equivalencies are reviewed regularly and updated or removed as appropriate. Departments may annually review their minimum qualifications and equivalencies during an official department meeting. After reviewing the minimum qualifications and equivalencies for a discipline, a department may propose to create, modify, renew, or remove an equivalency. To do so, the department chair(s) must submit an original signed form and email an electronic copy of the attached equivalency form to the Academic Senate President detailing the requested equivalency, including a copy of the department minutes noting the discussion regarding the equivalencies and to provide a rationale for the change. Equivalencies must be at least equivalent to the state’s minimum qualifications; it is also permissible to request an equivalency that is more rigorous than the minimum qualifications (III.A.2-4, III.A.1-4). AP 7211 establishes that minimum qualifications and equivalencies are active for four years. Once approved, equivalencies are used in addition to minimum qualifications in determining factors of qualification. For Mt. SAC, the latest equivalency information for each discipline is available through the Minimum Qualifications and Equivalencies Database found in the resources section of the Academic Senate web page (III.A.2-5).

Factors of qualification are stated in all faculty job postings. To complete the hiring process, all applicants must provide documentation to HR of meeting the minimum qualifications by providing: 1) credentials or verification of minimum qualifications, 2) professional records and official, sealed college transcripts, and 3) verification of freedom from active tuberculosis. New faculty must also pass fingerprint clearance and employment verification and/or vocational verifications. HR uses the documentation from applicants to pre-screen and verify minimum qualifications have been met. As necessary, HR will consult with the Academic Senate President regarding verification or clarification of minimum qualifications. The Academic Senate President reviews all equivalency requests before HR forwards that application for review by the Screening and Selection Committee (III.A.1-15).

Listed below is a comparison between what is required in the standard and what is comparable in the College’s faculty posting.

Table III.A.2.-1. Faculty job posting alignment with ACCJC requirements.

ACCJC III.A.2 Mt. SAC Faculty Job Posting
Appropriate Degrees Required qualifications, preferred qualifications
Professional Experience Required qualifications, preferred qualifications
Discipline Expertise Required qualifications, preferred qualifications, major duties and responsibilities
Level of Assignment Job title, conditions of employment
Teaching Skills Major duties and responsibilities (including teaching, curriculum development and learning outcome development and assessments), preferred qualifications
Scholarly Activities Major duties and responsibilities
Potential to contribute to the mission of the institution Major duties and responsibilities
Development and review of curriculum Required qualifications, preferred qualification, major duties and responsibilities
Assessment of learning Required qualifications, preferred qualification, major duties and responsibilities

 

Both departmental faculty and the Academic Senate are involved in developing faculty job descriptions/postings. Faculty job postings describe teaching responsibilities as well as major duties requiring participation in curriculum development. Curriculum development at Mt. SAC includes review of curriculum as well as assessment of learning in an ongoing cyclical four-year course review process guided by the Educational Design Committee, a sub-committee of the Curriculum and Instruction Council.

All job announcements require applicants demonstrate clear evidence of sensitivity to and understanding of the diverse academic, socioeconomic, cultural, disability, gender identity, sexual orientation, and ethnic backgrounds of community college students. They are required to write to this issue on the application (III.A.2-6). Because this is listed as a minimum qualification, failure to adequately demonstrate a requisite level of sensitivity and understanding can result in a candidate not being further considered. Assessment of this critical issue continues at every level of the hiring process for all full-time and adjunct faculty, consistent with Board Policy and Administrative Procedure 7100 (III.A.2-7, III.A.2-8). In the final interview with the Vice President of Instruction, all applicants must address their preparation to address issues of equity within their classrooms.

During the interview process, faculty positions may require teaching demonstrations to display knowledge of subject matter. Presentations may be completed in front of a hiring committee or a live class of students in the department related to the position. During live presentations in front of a class of students, each student is required to complete an evaluation for each candidate interviewing for the position.

Factors of qualification of discipline expertise, level of assignment, teaching skills, scholarly activities, and potential to contribute to the mission of the College are included in the faculty collective bargaining agreement and faculty evaluation process (I.C.7-2 pg. 67-70).

Distance learning (DL) courses at Mt. SAC are taught by both full-time and adjunct faculty. Each Division Dean manages the courses in his/her division, and the Vice President of Instruction oversees all of the programs. All academic faculty are hired based on the minimum qualifications for each discipline. In addition, faculty who desire to teach online must be certified via Skills and Pedagogy for Online Teaching (SPOT). SPOT training is offered online to faculty and is self-paced. Each stage of SPOT skill acquisition is verified by faculty users who view the work online (I.B.1-43). Once faculty have demonstrated that they have all skills required and know all the legal mandates for online teaching, they are certified to teach online in DL or hybrid classes. In addition, those faculty members who use the College’s learning management system (LMS, currently Moodlerooms) have received training in the basic mechanics of the LMS: uploading and downloading files, adding images, working in the gradebook, assignments, quizzes, and more (III.A.2-9, III.A.2-10).

Mt. SAC online training programs address both pedagogical concerns with DL as well as the technical aspects of teaching online. Workshops deal with each technical area of the LMS. Faculty may take these workshops as often as they like, and there are also faculty and staff in the Online Learning Support Center (OLSC) who help faculty with specific training and questions. Faculty may not have access to their course LMS unless they have received the basic level of training in that LMS or equivalent. LMS access is monitored by the OLSC.

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) faculty qualifications require knowledge of the subject matter and requisite skills for the service to be performed. Factors of qualification include appropriate degrees, professional experience, discipline expertise, level of assignment, teaching skills, scholarly activities, sensitivity to and understanding of diversity, and potential to contribute to the mission of the institution. Faculty job descriptions include development and review of curriculum as well as assessment of learning. Based on the narrative above, the College meets Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges Eligibility Requirement 14.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • At the department level, faculty job descriptions are reviewed for qualifications, duties and responsibilities by the Dean and the Department Chair; reviewed and approved by the Academic Senate; and, forwarded to HR for additional review and approval for final posting.
  • To complete the hiring process, all applicants must provide documentation to HR of meeting the minimum qualifications by providing credentials or verification of minimum qualifications and professional records and official, sealed college transcripts.
  • Faculty job postings describe teaching responsibilities as well as major duties requiring participation in curriculum development. Curriculum development at Mt. SAC includes review of curriculum as well as assessment of learning in an ongoing cyclical four-year course review process guided by the Educational Design Committee.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.B.1-43 Link to SPOT Training
I.C.7-2 Faculty Agreement 2014-17 Year 2 of 3 pg. 67-70
III.A.1-2 Minimum Qualifications for Each Discipline
III.A.1-4 Discipline List of Equivalencies Website
III.A.1-15 BP7120 Recruitment and Hiring
III.A.2-1 ED Code 87400-87488- Employment for Academic Positions
III.A.2-2 ED Code 87355-87359
III.A.2-3 AP7120 Recruitment and Hiring Faculty
III.A.2-4 Equivalency Determination Supplemental Form
III.A.2-5 AP7211- Minimum Qualifications and Equivalencies Database
III.A.2-6 Faculty Job Posting
III.A.2-7 BP7100 Commitment to Diversity
III.A.2-8 AP7100 Commitment to Diversity
III.A.2-9 AP4105- SPOT Requirement
III.A.2-10 MoodleRoom Support

III.A.3.

Administrators and other employees responsible for educational programs and services possess qualifications necessary to perform duties required to sustain institutional effectiveness and academic quality.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) relies on leadership and content knowledge of existing administrators to identify the necessary qualifications for positions within their programs and service areas. Job descriptions for staff and administrators are reviewed at the department level by the hiring manager and Human Resources (HR) each time a position is posted for recruitment. Newly developed positions are vetted by executive management (Cabinet) and approved by the Board of Trustees when first implemented. Then job descriptions are reviewed by the hiring manager and HR each time they are posted for recruitment (III.A.3-1, III.A.3-2, III.A.3-3, III.A.3-4, III.A.3-5). Additionally, classified union employees review and approve new classified positions.

Qualifications for administrators and other employees are outlined in the job posting and include the state minimum qualifications, as appropriate, and College-determined desirable qualifications. The desirable qualifications for academic and classified administrators are determined based on the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to sustain institutional effectiveness and academic quality. The knowledge, skills, and abilities required for classified positions are outlined in the position descriptions. All job announcements require that applicants demonstrate their sensitivity to diversity (III.A.3-6). Prior to the announcement of job openings, position descriptions are reviewed and updated by HR staff in conjunction with appropriate department personnel to ensure accuracy and currency.

The screening and interview processes are constructed around the publicized qualifications. The strongest candidates who meet the minimum standards proceed through a process designed to assess how well they meet the desirable qualifications. HR provides Screening and Selection Committees with orientation and guidance to ensure consistent and fair application of hiring procedures.

Classified staff are evaluated each year, and part of that evaluation includes whether job skills meet programmatic needs. Classified staff have a contractual reclassification process that is used to ensure essential duties keep up with programmatic needs (III.A.3-6, III.A.1-9B pg. 37-38, III.A.3-7 pg. 45-46). During classified staff performance evaluation, managers review programmatic needs and the position’s essential duties. California School Employee Association (CSEA) 262 and CSEA 651 collective bargaining agreements contain the performance evaluation forms (III.A.1-20). During the recruitment process for classified positions, applicants undergo evaluation to ensure the position qualifications and knowledge skills and abilities, which are
intended to sustain institutional effectiveness and academic quality, are met.

Analysis and Evaluation

Qualifications for administrators and classified employees at Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) are outlined on the position announcement and include the state minimum qualifications, as appropriate, and College-determined desirable qualifications. The desirable qualifications for academic and classified administrators are determined based on the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to sustain institutional effectiveness and academic quality. Moreover, the selection process is focused on how well candidates meet the published qualifications.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Mt. SAC adheres to the California Community College Chancellor’s Office Minimum Qualifications for Faculty and Administrators in California Community Colleges. HR completes the minimum qualifications screenings to ensure minimum qualification requirements are met and the candidate is able to contribute toward sustainable institutional effectiveness and academic quality.
  • Job descriptions for staff and administrators are reviewed at the department level by the hiring manager and HR each time a position is posted for recruitment.
  • Newly developed positions are reviewed by President’s Cabinet and approved by the Board of Trustees when first implemented and reviewed by the hiring manager and HR each time they are posted for recruitment.
  • In this review process, alignment is made with the College’s mission that focuses on institutional effectiveness and academic quality.

List of Evidence

Title Content
III.A.1-9B Contractual Reclassification Process pg. 37-38
III.A.1-20 Human Resources Website
III.A.3-1 Confidential Assignment Descriptions
III.A.3-2 Management Assignment Descriptions
III.A.3-3 Supervisory Assignment Descriptions
III.A.3-4 CSEA 262 Classification Descriptions
III.A.3-5 CSEA 651 Classification Descriptions
III.A.3-6 Sensitivity to Diversity
III.A.3-7 Contractual Reclassification Process pg. 45-46

III.A.4.

Required degrees held by faculty, administrators and other employees are from institutions accredited by recognized U.S. accrediting agencies. Degrees from non-U.S. institutions are recognized only if equivalence has been established.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Mt. San Antonio College’s (Mt. SAC’s) Office of Human Resources (HR) collects, reviews, and files all official transcripts that confirm required degrees. Position classification descriptions and job postings for positions at Mt. SAC state that degrees must be from regionally accredited United States agencies. HR verifies official transcripts. Unofficial transcripts are accepted at the time of application with official transcripts required upon employment (III.A.1-20, I.C.7-2 pg. 67-70, III.A.2-6, III.A.2-3, III.A.1-16, III.A.1-17). Applicants with degrees from non-American institutions must secure and provide a certified evaluation of transcripts, in English,

conducted by a professionally recognized evaluation service (III.A.4-1). This requirement is stated in all job postings. The College retains full authority and responsibility to grant equivalency.

Analysis and Evaluation

Required degrees held by faculty, administrators, and other employees of Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) are from institutions accredited by recognized United States accrediting agencies. Degrees from non-American institutions are recognized only if equivalency has been established.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Position classification descriptions and job postings for positions at the College state that degrees must be from regionally accredited institutions.
  • HR requires that certified evaluations of non-American degrees be secured and provided by applicants and verifies transcripts.
  • The College decides whether equivalency has been established.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.C.7-2 Faculty Agreement 2014-17 Year 2 of 3 pg. 67-70
III.A.1-16 AP7121 Recruitment and Hiring Classified Employees
III.A.1-17 AP7122 Recruitment and Hiring Management Employees
III.A.1-20 Human Resources Website
III.A.2-3 AP7120 Recruitment and Hiring Faculty
III.A.2-6 Faculty Job Posting
III.A.4-1 Foreign Transcripts

III.A.5.

The institution assures the effectiveness of its human resources by evaluating all personnel systematically and at stated intervals. The institution establishes written criteria for evaluating all personnel, including performance of assigned duties and participation in institutional responsibilities and other activities appropriate to their expertise. Evaluation processes seek to assess effectiveness of personnel and encourage improvement. Actions taken following evaluations are formal, timely, and documented.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Personnel are Systematically Evaluated Using Written Criteria that has been Established

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) utilizes an electronic system, developed and maintained by the Office of Human Resources (HR), to inform evaluators when evaluations are due and when they are overdue for classified staff and management employees. This information is available to evaluators, the employees, and President’s Cabinet through the employee portal (III.A.5-1, III.A.5-2). Performance evaluation practices and cycles for faculty and classified staff are documented in collective bargaining agreements (III.A.1-9B pg. 41, III.A.3-7 pg. 45-46). Performance evaluation practices for non-represented classified staff (confidential and supervisory) are documented on an evaluation form that was developed in collaboration between the Vice President of Human Resources and representatives of confidential and supervisory employees (III.A.5-3, III.A.5-4 pg. 2, III.A.5-5). Performance evaluation practices for administrators were revised in 2016 in a joint effort between the President and the Management Steering Committee (III.A.5-6). Performance evaluation forms for all employees provide areas for assessing effectiveness and encouraging improvement.

Contract and regular faculty are evaluated systematically and at stated intervals in accordance with Education Code and the faculty collective bargaining agreement (III.A.2-10). Contract faculty are evaluated each year during their first four probationary years of employment. In years one and two, evaluations are done by management, at least two tenured faculty and students, plus a self evaluation. These same evaluations are performed over years three and four, resulting in a summary evaluation and a recommendation on tenure status. Evaluation of regular faculty is a three-year process consisting of student evaluations (first year), classroom visitations (second year), and a summary of the evaluation activities (third year). Additionally, a self evaluation report is submitted in years one and two. Adjunct and partial contract faculty are evaluated in a four-year process, including an evaluation in each of the first two semesters and ongoing classroom visitations, student evaluations, and an optional self evaluation. Written evaluation criteria are contained in the faculty collective bargaining agreement (Article 18).

Probationary classified employees are evaluated at the second and fifth month intervals during their first six months of employment. Permanent classified employees are evaluated annually during the month of the employees' anniversary date. Written criteria are stated in the performance evaluation form.

Administrative employees are evaluated during the first year of employment and every two years thereafter. The process is contained in a written document titled Administrative Employees Evaluation Procedures, and evaluation criteria are stated in the Administrative Employees Evaluation form (III.A.5-7). As noted above, the electronic portal allows administrators to know which employees are due for their evaluations.

Evaluations of the Vice Presidents are accomplished using their contract language as well as the accreditation requirements. Mirroring the managers’ evaluation process, Vice Presidents complete a self evaluation. Once this is completed, a meeting with the President allows for collegial dialogue regarding the Vice President’s strengths and opportunities for improvement. Evaluations occur systematically every two years.

The evaluation of the College President/CEO is based on the job description, goals, and objectives of the past year, characteristics of performance, and other elements previously agreed upon. As part of the evaluation process, the College President/CEO and the Board of Trustees mutually agree upon the goals and objectives to be considered for the following year. The Board of Trustees include in the goals and objectives for the following year those items that have merit for future evaluation.

The annual evaluation is scheduled to coincide with the conclusion of the College President’s/CEO’s contract year. The evaluation forms are distributed to the members of the Board of Trustees one month prior to the end of the contract year. The final evaluation is based upon progress toward goals and objectives, a composite of the evaluation forms completed by individual members of the Board of Trustees, and the College President/CEO’s self evaluation. The College President/CEO provides a 360 evaluation to members of the College community to provide him with specific input.

The Board of Trustees, as a whole, meets with the College President/CEO to discuss the final evaluation. A copy of the final evaluation is given to the College President/CEO prior to that meeting. The evaluation includes a discussion of both strengths and weaknesses. Each judgment is based upon an objective review derived from an examination of available information. A final written summary evaluation is prepared by the Board of Trustees. A signed copy is retained by the College President/CEO and one is placed in the College President/CEO’s personnel file (III.A.5-8, III.A.5-9).

Evaluation Processes Seek to Assess Effectiveness of Personnel and Encourage Improvement, while any Actions Takes are Formal, Timely, and Documented

Human resource effectiveness is based on evaluations. Mt. SAC believes that effective evaluations are based on job descriptions. For the past three years, Mt. SAC has undergone a classification study using an outside vendor (Koff and Associates). In addition, California School Employee Association (CSEA) 262 and CSEA 651 have been in ongoing collaboration with HR to complete a job analysis for each classified position. The evaluation process for confidential and supervisory personnel is modeled after the CSEA process. Evaluations are conducted on a yearly basis. This process positively influence effectiveness of personnel as well as encourages improvement. Performance evaluation forms for faculty, staff, and managers provide opportunities for coaching and goal setting.

To support meaningful use of evaluation tools, Professional and Organizational Development (POD) has offered “Managing Performance Through Evaluations”, a workshop led by the Liebert, Cassidy, Whitmore law firm (III.A.5-10). Key components of the evaluation process are to recognize excellent and satisfactory performance in the areas of assignment and in accomplishing College goals and objectives to identify areas of performance needing improvement and to document unsatisfactory performance. If improvements are required, an improvement plan is developed which provides specific areas of needed improvement, means of improvement, resources available, and time frame within which the improvement is to be accomplished. Written improvement plans are forwarded to the appropriate administrator and HR. The Vice President of HR coaches and assists managers with developing performance improvement plans for employees as necessary. Actions following evaluations are formal and timely.

All tenured teaching faculty are evaluated on a three-year cycle as required by the faculty collective bargaining agreement. This cycle includes peer evaluation, student evaluation, and administrative evaluation. Adjunct faculty and full-time faculty have regular evaluation cycles during which each teacher is evaluated. Faculty are also required to reflect on performances and evaluations as part of a self evaluation process, using student and classroom evaluations as a basis for personal assessment and setting goals in areas for personal or course improvement (III.A.5-11 pg. 131).

The distance learning classroom visitation is used for evaluation of faculty teaching online (III.A.5-12 pg. 137-138). As part of the process, students perform online evaluations of distance learning faculty. Faculty activate these online student evaluations and automatically receive reports. Deans review these evaluations in a cycle determined by the faculty collective bargaining agreement. Faculty underperforming in distance learning courses may lose the ability to teach such courses at the discretion of their Dean, who has right of assignment (III.A.5-13 pg. 45).

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) assures the effectiveness of its human resources by evaluating all personnel systematically and at stated intervals. The College establishes written criteria for evaluating all personnel, including performance of assigned duties and participation in institutional responsibilities and other activities appropriate to their expertise. Evaluation processes seek to assess effectiveness of personnel and encourage improvement. Actions taken following evaluations are formal, timely, and documented.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Mt. SAC utilizes an electronic system, developed and maintained by HR, to inform evaluators when evaluations are due and when they are overdue for staff and management employees.
  • Performance evaluation practices for faculty and represented classified staff are documented in collective bargaining agreements.
  • Evaluation practices for managers, supervisors, and confidentials are developed collaboratively with each constituency and documented in evaluation forms.
  • Performance evaluation forms for all employees provide areas for assessing effectiveness and encouraging improvement.

List of Evidence

Title Content
III.A.1-9B Contractual Reclassification Process pg. 37-38
III.A.2-10 MoodleRoom Support
III.A.3-7 Contractual Reclassification Process pg. 45-46
III.A.5-1 Classified Employee Evaluation Form CSEA 262
III.A.5-2 Classified Employee Evaluation Form CSEA 651
III.A.5-3 Human Resources Forms
III.A.5-4 President Action Cabinet Notes 5-26-2015 pg. 2
III.A.5-5 Confidential and Supervisory Employee Evaluation Form
III.A.5-6 Performance Evaluations for Management October Revision
III.A.5-7 Administrative Employees Evaluation Form
III.A.5-8 Evaluation of President/CEO
III.A.5-9 BP2435 Evaluation of President/CEO
III.A.5-10 Human Resources Leadership and Management Workshop
III.A.5-11 Self-Evaluation Process Student and Classroom Evaluations pg. 131
III.A.5-12 Evaluation of Faculty Teaching Online pg. 137-138
III.A.5-13 Dean's Right of Assignment pg. 45

III.A.6.

The evaluation of faculty, academic administrators, and other personnel directly responsible for student learning includes, as a component of that evaluation, consideration of how these employees use the results of the assessment of learning outcomes to improve teaching and learning.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) strongly believes that creation and measurement of student learning outcomes, and higher level outcomes, are a collaborative discussion that requires interaction between many colleagues to ensure articulation with College plans to achieve student success (I.A.1-12, I.A.2-5). The College maintains four levels of outcomes, where student learning outcomes (SLOs) directly impact levels that are broader in the assessment hierarchy. The College requires measurement of outcomes in courses (SLO), in units (administrative unit outcomes, AUOs), in programs of study (program learning outcomes, PLOs), and at the institutional level (ILOs). The College uses the measureable outcomes at each level to determine what students know, think, feel or do as a result of their educational experience and uses these results to analyze whether the students are learning what they are expected to learn. The College has a framework for reporting the outcomes (I.A.1-30). Individual units collaborate to inform data on SLOs by course as aggregate rather than individual courses, by program, and by unit. Individual units also work to articulate their more granular learning

outcomes with the broader institutional goals (I.B.1-24, III.A.6-1, I.A.1-30). All lower-level outcomes (SLO, PLO, AUO) are mapped to the ILOs: communication, critical thinking, information and technology literacy, and personal, social, civic and environmental responsibility. The ongoing mapping process was initiated in 2013, and completed in June 2016. Mt. SAC's Distance learning (DL) courses are adapted into a distance education delivery mode from regular face-to-face courses and have the same SLOs as traditional courses or additional SLOs. Distance learning course SLOs are assessed on the same timeline and process as their traditional counterparts. The College requires all employees who are directly responsible for student learning to participate in the outcomes assessment process. The culture of participation in outcomes has been further enhanced by support of the Academic Senate (III.A.6-2, III.A.6-3).

The evaluation process for all faculty has multiple areas where involvement in outcomes is checked including preparing records and reports accurately, submitting them to the proper offices within established deadlines, to be involved with the total program of the College, and maintenance knowledge of current department assessment activities (I.C.7-2 pg. 68-72, 85-88). In addition, full-time faculty complete a report of service to the College where participation in outcomes assessment and activity is documented. The faculty collective bargaining agreement also provides adjunct faculty up to three hours each academic year of paid time to work on SLOs, as they are a part of the evaluation process explained above. Faculty individually are not responsible to report data on their class; classes are assessed in aggregate on a four-year cycle, although many disciplines assess more frequently (I.A.1-28). Department chairs are evaluated on their ability to gather, organize, analyze, and utilize information and data regarding department functioning within specified timelines and to facilitate the collaborative development, revision, and monitoring of outcomes for courses and programs annually with the participation of their faculty members (I.C.7-2 pg. 71-72). SLOs for each course are required to be up to date in data, analysis, and use of results in order to be submitted for the four-year course review process (I.A.1-28).

Mt. SAC has developed a shared definition across divisions and work groups for “academic administrators, and other personnel directly responsible for student learning.” Tutors and tutoring's role in SLOs are assessed regularly at tutoring programs and centers, e.g., Learning Assistance Center, the Writing Center, Math Activities Resource Center. The College maintains management evaluation procedures and an administrative evaluation form which documents how they use the results of the assessment of learning outcomes to improve teaching and learning. The instruction team managers first piloted this process. Based on this work, management staff worked with HR to create a final form for the College. This process allows the manager and administrator the opportunity for guided conversations about how their work supports outcomes assessment and what resources might be further needed by faculty and students. This process also allows for synergy of ideas about what has been done and what could be done (e.g., more retreats that include more part-time faculty) (III.A.5-6).

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC), the evaluation of faculty, academic administrators, and other personnel directly responsible for student learning includes, as a component of that evaluation, consideration of how these employees use the results of the assessment of learning outcomes to improve teaching and learning.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Mt. SAC evaluates the effectiveness of developing student learning outcomes and assessment of teachers, tutors, and others involved in both traditional and distance learning teaching-learning processes.
  • Department chairs are evaluated on their ability to gather, organize, analyze and utilize information and data regarding department functioning within specified timelines; and also to facilitate the collaborative development, revision, and monitoring of outcomes for courses and programs.
  • The College maintains management evaluation procedures and an administrative evaluation form which document the results of the assessment of learning outcomes to improve teaching and learning.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.A.1-12 Student Equity Plan
I.A.1-28 Information Technology Master Plan
I.A.1-30 Outcomes Plan 2012-2020
I.A.2-5 Student Success Plan
I.B.1-24 Summary Report for ILO Mapping 8-2016
I.C.7-2 Faculty Agreement 2014-17 Year 2 of 3 pg. 68-72, 85-88
I.C.7-2 Faculty Agreement 2014-17 Year 2 of 3 pg. 71-72
III.A.5-6 Performance Evaluations for Management October Revision
III.A.6-1 Outcomes Mapping Template
III.A.6-2 Support for Program-Level Outcomes Resolution 06-2013
III.A.6-3 Program Outcome Reporting Resolution

III.A.7.

The institution maintains a sufficient number of qualified faculty, which includes full-time faculty and may include part-time and adjunct faculty, to assure the fulfillment of faculty responsibilities essential to the quality of educational programs and services to achieve institutional mission and purposes.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) maintains lists of occupied and vacant faculty, staff, and management positions in its annual budget document (III.A.7-1, III.A.7-2, III.A.7-3). The Faculty Position Control Report is maintained by Fiscal Services and regularly reviewed by the Vice President of Instruction and presented at Cabinet to ensure a sufficient number of qualified faculty are maintained (III.A.7-4). By September each year, each department or discipline determines its need for contract faculty for the following year and submits a recommendation to the Division Dean. The Dean prioritizes those hiring requests in consultation with the area department chairs or representatives of the departments if a department chair does not exist. These division rankings are forwarded to the Vice President of Instruction who meets with division deans and associate deans to establish a division-wide prioritized list. The Vice President of Instruction forwards a copy of all requests to the Academic Senate for use in their independent evaluation and ranking process.

In two parallel processes, the faculty rankings from Instruction and Student Services are evaluated on the College level and placed into one ranked prioritization listing. The Academic Senate Executive Board evaluates and prioritizes faculty hiring requests in a closed session using agreed upon criteria and a rubric (III.A.7-4). Division rankings are evaluated based on their written documentation and justification for need in hiring. Instruction and Student Services each evaluate and prioritize faculty hiring needs and requests, then combine the lists to generate the instruction full-time hiring rankings using information from the College’s annual Planning for Institutional Effectiveness (PIE) process. These lists are submitted to the Academic Mutual Agreement Council (AMAC) for consolidation (III.A.7-5). Finalized rankings are developed and approved at AMAC. Following approval, the College President/CEO issues instructions to Human Resources (HR) for filling a specified number of academic positions, based on the established College hiring procedures.

The number of positions hired in a given year is informed by a minimum number set by the California Community College system formula, the full-time faculty obligation number, or FON (III.A.7-6, III.A.7-7). The College is committed to meeting or exceeding the full-time faculty obligation number. Needs assessments for adjunct staffing are conducted at the department level on an ongoing basis and are focused on ensuring that there is quality instruction available to fulfill program needs and course demands. This is determined by the amount of lecture hour equivalents that remain to deliver courses listed in the course schedule after load is assigned to full-time faculty as regular assignment and overload, or to ensure there is instruction in an area of specialty that the full-time faculty do not have.

In many instances, adjunct faculty are working in the field in which they are teaching. This is true of both Career and Technical Education (CTE) and transfer disciplines. Examples are seen in accounting, animation, psychology, paralegal, and architecture. The need for adjunct faculty is also adjusted by the Instruction Office as enrollment demand for courses is tracked and College growth in courses and programs is managed. Full-time faculty participate in scheduling of their department courses, in partnership with Division Deans and department chairs, and ensure that course offerings are available for a diversity of student needs and enable students to complete programs or course sequences in a timely manner. Areas with limited full-time faculty may have adjunct faculty participate in College committees and recommending course offerings together with the division manager. Adjuncts are hired both through existing recruitment pools and through one-time postings on an “as needed basis.” Adjuncts who are current employees are given preference for course assignments based on their qualifications, interests, employment longevity, and rehire rights (I.C.7-2 pg. 41).

The College's faculty may teach traditional and distance learning (DL) courses within their assignment. Article 13.B.8 of the faculty collective bargaining agreement specifies that DL courses must also be offered in traditional format, unless exceptions are approved by the Department Dean and Vice President of Instruction. Traditional courses have scheduling priority over DL courses unless an exception is granted by the Instruction Office (I.C.7-2). DL and hybrid courses are assigned to faculty who have been locally certified to teach DL courses and who request to teach in DL or hybrid modality as part of the regular scheduling process within departments and divisions. Courses articulate through the C-ID course identification system and have qualified DL faculty assigned.

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) maintains a sufficient number of qualified faculty, which includes full-time faculty and may include adjunct faculty, to assure the fulfillment of faculty responsibilities essential to the quality of educational programs and services to achieve institutional mission and purposes. Based on the narrative above, the College meets Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges Eligibility Requirement 14.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Mt. SAC is committed to meeting or exceeding the full-time faculty obligation number and has a formal process for ensuring a sufficient number of qualified faculty are employed at the College.
  • Needs assessments for adjunct staffing are conducted at the department level on an ongoing basis, and are focused on ensuring that there is quality instruction available to fulfill program needs and course demands.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.C.7-2 Faculty Agreement 2014-17 Year 2 of 3 pg. 41
I.C.7-2 Faculty Agreement 2014-17 Year 2 of 3
III.A.7-1 Annual Budget Presentation
III.A.7-2 PAC Meeting Presentation 9-9-2015
III.A.7-3 BOT Meeting Minutes 9-9-2015
III.A.7-4 Faculty Position Control Report
III.A.7-5 AS Faculty Ranking Criteria
III.A.7-6 California Community College Full-time Faculty Obligation Fall 2015
III.A.7-7 Title 5 Sections 53302, 53309, and 53310

III.A.8.

An institution with part-time and adjunct faculty has employment policies and practices which provide for their orientation, oversight, evaluation, and professional development. The institution provides opportunities for integration of part-time and adjunct faculty into the life of the institution.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Orientation, Oversight, and Evaluation are Provided for Adjunct Faculty

Adjunct hiring is addressed in AP 7120 Recruitment and Hiring: Faculty (III.A.2-3). The Human Resources (HR) hiring packet for adjunct faculty includes broad orientation information. A more in-depth orientation, specifically related to the position in which the adjunct faculty is appointed, occurs at the department and division level. Adjunct faculty are provided with information regarding the course outline of record being taught, student learning outcomes (SLO) assessment, texts and materials for courses, invitation to department meetings, campus services, and specific equipment training as needed (III.A.8-1, III.A.8-2, III.A.8-3, III.A.8-4). Adjuncts are also provided with information regarding the evaluation process, which is described in the faculty collective bargaining agreement (I.C.7-2 pg. 68-71, 85-88). Division Deans and department chairs meet with new adjunct faculty to provide division and discipline specific information. The Faculty Association also hosts an orientation for new adjunct faculty prior to the start of fall and spring semesters.

Adjunct Faculty are Integrated into the College

Mt. SAC adjunct faculty are valued at the College and are integrated into multiple processes including shared governance, academic and professional work, student clubs and mentorship, task forces, SLOs, outreach activities, curriculum development, coaching/ mentoring, and department/institutional planning.

Faculty participation in department meetings, mentorship of students through clubs and activities, and academic and professional work is highly encouraged. Faculty representation on task forces is balanced among departmental areas, as well as considerations of full-time and adjunct faculty (II.B.1-7). Faculty representation on governance committees, such as Faculty Association adjunct positions, Academic Senate adjunct positions, Faculty Professional Development Committee adjunct, Student Programs and Success adjunct, and other designated adjunct governance positions is paid at the non-instructional rate (I.C.7-2 pg. 41). The School of Continuing Education departments hold department faculty meetings to review SLO assessment cycle and previous year’s results and to determine the upcoming year’s institutional learning objectives assessments. Adjunct faculty who attend are paid up to two hours (III.A.8-1).

Adjunct faculty are informed about campus events through the website and through several email processes: campus-level announcements to all campus members, faculty-level announcements to all faculty, and adjunct faculty announcements to all adjunct faculty. Division Deans are frequently asked to send email notices to their current lists of adjunct faculty. Opinions of all faculty are solicited through surveys in areas of professional development and engagement, in technology needs, and in departmental topics. Part-time faculty needs are considered both as a group and as part of the full-time faculty in order to best ensure that the documented needs of campus faculty overall are met.

Adjunct faculty who are members of the Faculty Association are represented on the Association by adjunct faculty and vote with equal status on collective bargaining agreement negotiation topics and on ratifying the collective bargaining agreements (III.A.8-5). Adjunct faculty representatives participate in the negotiation process as part of the negotiations team.

Adjunct faculty are recognized for their efforts at the College. Recognitions vary from the annual Faculty Appreciation week, sponsored by the Faculty Association, where faculty enjoy food, entertainment, and win prizes to events where coffee or lunch is shared with faculty (III.A.8-6). Campus-wide longevity recognitions awarded when faculty have had 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 ,35, 40 or more years of employment include adjunct faculty (III.A.8-7). The Academic Senate Outstanding Adjunct Faculty Awards and Academic Senate 10+1 awards recognize faculty and other employees who have made significant contributions to Academic Senate areas of responsibilities (III.A.8-8, III.A.8-9 pg. 7). Adjunct faculty are regularly included at Transfer Celebration Day when faculty are recognized by students for their assistance in achieving transfer and completion goals (III.A.8-10). Faculty Association-sponsored annual departmental Outstanding Adjunct Faculty awards began in 2015 to specifically highlight achievements of adjunct faculty (III.A.8-11). Finally, adjunct faculty are equal contenders for campus wide recognitions, such as Educator of Distinction and President’s Awards. Adjunct faculty are also welcome to participate in commencement ceremonies in their regalia.

Adjunct Faculty are Provided Professional Development

College adjunct faculty are strongly supported in their professional development through multiple avenues on campus. Professional development for all faculty is available irrespective of their full- or part-time employment status.

Adjunct faculty are encouraged to participate in flexible calendar training days (FLEX) held on campus. FLEX training is mandatory one day per year for full-time faculty and optional for the second day. FLEX training for adjunct faculty is compensated for up to two hours of training each FLEX day, at the non-instructional rate. Each FLEX day contains workshops of general interest and sessions specific to adjunct interests (III.A.8-12, III.A.8-13, III.A.8-14 pg. 3, III.A.8-15). FLEX training is agreed upon between the Faculty Professional Development Committee and the Academic Senate FLEX Task Force and utilizes assessments of faculty needs as well as prior FLEX evaluations to select workshop offerings and presenters.

In addition to FLEX, adjunct faculty are able to participate in professional growth increments and salary advancement credit/salary schedule credit/column crossover activities. Professional and Organizational Development (POD) opportunities are also available to all faculty, full-time or adjunct. All faculty may apply for specialized training for up to $1,500 in conference and travel funding annually. For those interested in pursuing leadership opportunities, the San Gabriel/Foothill Association of Community Colleges (SanFACC) mentor program is available to any faculty member to apply and be matched with a mentor from a partner institution. Finally, all faculty have access to Lynda.com for online training on thousands of topics, including varied technology tools.

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) has employment policies and practices which provide for adjunct faculty orientation, oversight, evaluation, and professional development. Mt. SAC provides opportunities for integration of adjunct faculty into the life of the College.

Accomplishments

  • Mt. SAC adjunct faculty are valued at the College and are integrated into ongoing College processes including oversight, evaluation, shared governance, academic and professional work, and planning.
  • Orientation, specifically related to the position in which the adjunct faculty is appointed, occurs at the department and division level.
  • Adjunct faculty are publicly recognized for their efforts at the College through appreciation efforts and awards.
  • College adjunct faculty are strongly supported in their professional development.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.C.7-2 Faculty Agreement 2014-17 Year 2 of 3 pg. 68-71, 85-88
I.C.7-2 Faculty Agreement 2014-17 Year 2 of 3 pg. 41
I.C.7-2 Faculty Agreement 2014-17 Year 2 of 3
II.B.1-7 Academic Senate
III.A.2-3 AP7120 Recruitment and Hiring Faculty
III.A.8-1 SLO Documentation for Adjunct Faculty
III.A.8-2 KAD Division Instructor Handbook
III.A.8-3 CIS SLO Meeting
III.A.8-4 Business Adjunct Handbook
III.A.8-5 Faculty Association Homepage
III.A.8-6 Faculty Appreciation Week 2015
III.A.8-7 FLEX Opening Meeting
III.A.8-8 Academic Senate Outstanding Adjunct Faculty Awards
III.A.8-9 Academic Senate 10 +1 Awards pg. 7
III.A.8-10 Transfer Celebration Day
III.A.8-11 Faculty Association Outstanding Adjunct Faculty Awards
III.A.8-12 POD FLEX Announcement
III.A.8-13 Emails Announcing FLEX
III.A.8-14 Academic Senate Minutes 5-19-2016 pg. 3
III.A.8-15 PAC Minutes 8-10-2016

III.A.9.

The institution has a sufficient number of staff with appropriate qualifications to support the effective educational, technological, physical, and administrative operations of the institution. (ER 8)

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) maintains sufficient staffing with appropriate qualifications through its hiring Administrative Procedures, Planning for Institutional Effectiveness (PIE) process, Budget Committee approval process, and decisions made at Cabinet meetings (III.A.1-16, III.A.9-1, III.A.9-2, III.A.7-1, III.A.2-3). It maintains lists of occupied and vacant faculty, staff, and management positions in its annual budget document. New or replacement positions in staff and management are established and requested through the PIE process and recruited when the appropriate Vice President or the College President/CEO submits a Request to Fill form to the Office of Fiscal Services for budget verification. Such requests must be accompanied by a current job description for the position and verified budget allocation from Fiscal Services (III.A.2-3). President’s Cabinet reviews the fiscal analysis for the position as well as the justification for it. If approved, the position documentation is forwarded to HR and this documentation may include a request that this position be placed near the top of the queue of positions being recruited. All positions are identified in the College budget whether these positions are filled or vacant.

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) has a sufficient number of staff with appropriate qualifications to support the effective educational, technological, physical, and administrative operations of the institution. The College’s program review process, PIE, allows each unit/department to present their reasons, with evidence, to support their need for new staff or to have staff update their qualifications. Based on the narrative above, the College meets Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges Eligibility Requirement 8.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Mt. SAC maintains sufficient staffing with appropriate qualifications through its hiring Administrative Procedures, Planning for Institutional Effectiveness (PIE) process, Budget Committee approval process, and decisions made at Cabinet meetings.

List of Evidence

Title Content
III.A.1-16 AP7121 Recruitment and Hiring - Classified Employees
III.A.2-3 AP7120 Recruitment and Hiring Faculty
III.A.7-1 Budget Presentation
III.A.9-1 Budget Committee Minutes
III.A.9-2 PAC Minutes Website

III.A.10.

The institution maintains a sufficient number of administrators with appropriate preparation and expertise to provide continuity and effective administrative leadership and services that support the institution’s mission and purposes. (ER 8)

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) maintains sufficient staffing with appropriate qualifications through its hiring Administrative Procedures, through its Planning for Institutional Effectiveness (PIE) process, through its Budget Committee approval process, and through discussions at its Cabinet meetings (III.A.1-17, III.A.9-1).

In the PIE process, departments and teams provide documentation connecting staffing requests to College and/or department goals. The link between planning and resource allocation is evident in the PIE process. Enrollment management data as well as program needs and connections to campus wide planning are mapped in the PIE process. The resource requests, including management hiring requests, inform more thoughtful planning and prioritization at the level of the department and the area. The appropriate Vice President or the College President/CEO submits to Human Resources (HR) a Request to Fill form. Such requests must be accompanied by a current job description for the position. The position must be approved by Fiscal Services and President’s Cabinet (III.A.2-3). The College maintains lists of occupied and vacant faculty, staff, and management positions in its annual budget document.

Qualifications for administrators are outlined in the job postings and include the state minimum qualifications, as appropriate, and College-determined desirable qualifications. The desirable qualifications for academic and classified administrators are determined based on the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to support the College’s mission and purposes. Prior to the announcement of job openings, position descriptions are reviewed and updated by HR in conjunction with appropriate service area administrators to ensure accuracy and currency. Further review of position descriptions is undertaken by President’s Cabinet.

A rigorous application and screening process is in place which includes a screening and interview committee composed of a manager of the position to be filled, two managers appointed by the College President/CEO, two faculty members selected by the Academic Senate, one classified employee selected by the appropriate unit, an Equal Employment Opportunity representative (non-voting), and additional members recommended by the President/CEO.

The screening and interview processes are constructed around the publicized qualifications. HR provides Screening and Selection Committees with orientation and guidance to ensure consistent and fair application of processes and measures to identify those candidates who will move forward in the process. The process further assesses the strength of the candidates’ preparation, expertise, and leadership abilities to support the College’s mission and purposes (III.A.1-17). Additionally, temporary special projects administrators are hired under the provisions of Education Code Section 72411 (III.A.1-18).

The College maintains competitive salaries and benefits to ensure that it attracts and retains highly qualified administrators to support the College’s mission and purposes (III.A.1-8).

Administrators are evaluated during the first year of employment and every two years thereafter. They are evaluated based on the following factors: professional goals/objectives for the evaluation period, performance, and a review and recommendation of goals for the next evaluation period (III.A.10-1). The Board of Trustees conducts an evaluation of the College President/CEO at least annually. The evaluation complies with the requirements set forth in the contract of employment and are based on the following criteria: Board Policy, the College President/CEO job description, and performance goals and objectives developed in accordance with Board Policy 2430 (III.A.10-2).

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) has a sufficient number of administrators with appropriate qualifications to support the effective educational, technological, physical, and administrative operations of the institution. The processes of program review and PIE allow each unit/department the opportunity to justify the need for specific administrator positions in order to support the College’s mission and purposes. Based on the narrative above, the College meets Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges Eligibility Requirement 8.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • The District maintains sufficient administrative staffing with appropriate qualifications through its hiring Administrative Procedures, the PIE process, Budget Committee approval process, and Cabinet decisions.

List of Evidence

Title Content
III.A.1-8 President Advisory Council Minutes 3-25-2015
III.A.1-17 AP7122 Recruitment and Hiring Management Employees
III.A.1-18 AP7135 Temporary Special Projects Administrators
III.A.2-3 AP7120 Recruitment and Hiring Faculty
III.A.9-1 Budget Committee Minutes
III.A.10-1 Management Evaluation Form
III.A.10-2 BP2430 Delegation of Authority to College President/CEO

III.A.11.

The institution establishes, publishes, and adheres to written personnel policies and procedures that are available for information and review. Such policies and procedures are fair and equitably and consistently administered.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

The College Establishes, Publishes, and Adheres to Written Personnel Policies and Procedures

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) establishes, publishes, and adheres to written personnel policies and procedures. The District’s personnel related Board Policies are found on the College Administrative Policies website under “Chapter 7 – Human Resources.” In addition, California School Employee Association 651, 262, and Faculty Association collective bargaining agreements are available on the District’s website (III.A.11-1).

The College ensures consistent and equitable application of personnel policies and procedures through new employee orientations, topical trainings, and regular communication with the leaders of faculty and classified senates and associations. The use of interest-based bargaining for labor negotiations facilitates open dialogue, facilitates communication, and helps to ensure that all policies and procedures are equitably administered.

The College maintains and updates its Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Plan through its EEO Advisory Committee, the Campus Equity and Diversity Committee, and provides EEO hiring training to its faculty, staff and administrators (III.A.11-2, II.A.7-4). The College distributes an annual Notice of Prevention of Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation, provides training, and conducts timely investigations of allegations of violations of its policies.

The College is implementing a revised EEO Plan that will be reviewed every two years, including implementing College employment practices that are consistent with the EEO Plan, reflecting sensitivity and understanding of student and employee diversity, and eliminating bias and unlawful discrimination in the employment process. The Campus Equity and Diversity plan ensures that “every stage [of the campus hiring process] includes an evaluation of sensitivity to, and understanding of, the diversity of students the College serves.” The EEO Plan’s immediate focus provides equal employment opportunity in recruitment, hiring policies, and practices pursuant to the applicable Title 5 regulations (Section 53000 et. seq.), and which reflect the District’s programmatic commitment to diversity. The EEO Plan includes the requirements for a variety of steps including complaint procedures for noncompliance with the Title 5 provisions relating to equal employment opportunity programs; complaint procedures in instances of unlawful discrimination; the establishment of a Campus Equity and Diversity Committee; methods to support equal employment opportunity; review processes to modify and/or encourage diversity education and allied programs; and procedures for dissemination of the EEO Plan. To properly serve a growing diverse population, the District is endeavoring to hire and retain faculty and staff who are sensitive to, and knowledgeable of, the value of diversity and equity in the workplace and in the District’s academic and vocational programs.

The District’s commitment to diversity is reflected in the recruitment and hiring practices. All classified, confidential, supervisory, faculty, and management positions are advertised in a number of diverse websites, and each applicant answers a diversity question his/her application. Should an applicant be selected to move forward in the interview, he/she is also asked at least one question regarding diversity.

In addition, the hiring committee members selected are a diverse group, gathered from different locations on campus. EEO and committee training is provided to employees prior to serving on Screening and Selection Committees. All recruitments have an EEO representative to monitor and ensure equity in the selection process.

College Policies and Procedures are Fair and Equitably and Consistently Administered.

Mt. SAC maintains the following HR administrator positions to support and guide College administrators and staff in the appropriate application of its personnel policies and procedures: Vice President of Human Resources; Director of Equal Employment Programs; and Director of Human Resources Operations and Employee Services.

Mt. SAC’s discrimination complaint process is compliant with applicable California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office regulations and state and federal laws and regulations regarding minimum wage, discrimination and harassment, and Family and Medical Leave Act. Required legal postings, such as EEO, are posted in the HR office, classrooms, and various public locations on campus.

Negotiated collective bargaining agreements that contain articles relating to personnel issues are available to all employees on the HR web pages. The College ensures compliance with personnel policies and procedures and collective bargaining agreements through its administrative staff with the support of HR.

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) establishes, publishes, and adheres to written personnel policies and procedures that are available for information and review. The policies and procedures are fair and equitably and consistently administered. The policies align with the College’s processes for its operations. Review processes are in place to update the processes as needed.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Mt. SAC’s personnel policies and procedures have been established by the Board of Trustees and are adhered to through implementation of Board Policies, Administrative Procedures, and the EEO Plan.
  • The College’s collective bargaining agreements support the fair, equitable, and consistent administration of personnel policies and procedures.

List of Evidence

Title Content
II.A.7-4 Equal Employment Opportunity
III.A.11-1 Board Policies and Administrative Procedures
III.A.11-2 CEDC Purpose, Function, and Members

III.A.12.

Through its policies and practices, the institution creates and maintains appropriate programs, practices, and services that support its diverse personnel. The institution regularly assesses its record in employment equity and diversity consistent with its mission.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) maintains and updates its Equal Employment Opportunity Plan through its EEO Advisory Committee, the Campus Equity and Diversity Committee (CEDC), and provides regular EEO hiring training to its faculty, staff, and administrators (III.A.11-2, II.A.7-4, III.A.12-1). The CEDC regularly assesses employment equity and diversity consistent with the College mission and Title 5 regulations. EEO representatives are members of hiring committees and are EEO trained to ensure policies and practices are implemented consistently during the hiring process. EEO representatives serve on each hiring committee. Employees may not participate on a hiring committee without EEO training (III.A.12-1). Mt. SAC also offers an EEO section in the New Employee Welcome Orientation for new classified employees twice a year.

The diversity of the employees is evaluated via Argos reports by Human Resources (III.A.12-2). Human Resources regularly sends job announcements to various websites and publications in order to ensure a diverse applicant pool.

Analysis and Evaluation

Through its policies and practices, Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) creates and maintains appropriate programs, practices, and services that support its diverse personnel. The College regularly assesses its record in employment equity and diversity consistent with its mission.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Mt. SAC maintains and updates its EEO Plan through its EEO Advisory Committee, Campus Equity and Diversity Committee, and provides regular EEO hiring training to faculty, staff, and administrators.
  • Statistics about employment diversity are annually assessed and communicated publicly.

List of Evidence

Title Content
II.A.7-4 Equal Employment Opportunity
III.A.11-2 CEDC Purpose, Function, and Members
III.A.12-1 POD Attendance, Sign-in sheets, and Evaluation
III.A.12-2 Employee Argos Report

III.A.13.

The institution upholds a written code of professional ethics for all of its personnel, including consequences for violation.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) does not have “a single” written code of ethics but several, some of which apply to all personnel and some to specific groups. These various codes demonstrate the College’s commitment to a high standard of ethical conduct, not only for all College personnel, but for the Board of Trustees and students as well. Board Policy and collective bargaining agreements contain language addressing professional ethics, and the Academic Senate created the Professional Relations Committee to address professional conduct and ethics for faculty. The Associated Students also has language to address ethical issues. While not included in this standard, the students’ code of conduct is another example of the College commitment to ethical conduct adopted as a campus wide philosophy. Mt. SAC is clearly resolute and sincere about professional ethics and conduct in all areas of the campus community above and beyond requirements of this standard.

As the governing body of the College, the Board of Trustees is held to the highest standard of professional and ethical conduct and sets the example for others to follow. During Board of Trustees meetings, Board Policy requires professional and ethical conduct, prohibiting offensive language and physical violence or threats (III.A.13-1).

Violators of this policy will be removed from the meeting room. Employees can be subject to disciplinary action if appropriate. This policy has not needed to be enforced in recent memory, demonstrating the highest regard for respect and decorum held by Board members, employees, and the public alike. Board Policy 2710 also prohibits Board members from personal or financial interest regarding matters appearing before the Board (III.A.13-2).

The Board of Trustees also follows a code of ethics standards as defined in Board Policy 2715 (III.A.13-3), which expects Board members to hold the educational welfare of the students as their primary concern when making all decisions. Board members are expected to ensure equal opportunity. They are entrusted with public funds; therefore, they are expected to protect, advance, and promote the interest of all citizens and to maintain independent judgment unbiased by private interest, partisan political groups, or any other source. Any violation of this Code of Ethics is promptly addressed by the Board of Trustees. Board members are also expected to make appearances at student functions on behalf of the College, but the policy reminds members they have no legal authority outside Board of Trustees meetings.

Board members, Vice Presidents, the Chief Technology Officer, and other selected College administrators are also required to file disclosure statements in accordance with the Conflict of Interest Code found in Administrative Procedure 2712 (III.A.13-4). This code ensures compliance with state and local regulations regarding disclosure of economic interests in compliance with the Political Reform Act (Government Code 81000 et seq.).

Mt. SAC holds its employees to a high standard of professional ethics. Board Policy 3050 is the Institutional Code of Ethics, which applies to all College personnel. It defines professional ethics “in absolute terms as one who is fair, honest, straightforward, trustworthy, dispassionate, and unprejudiced” (III.A.13-5). This code also extends to students, who are “expected to abide by ethical behavior and decision-making in their treatment of College employees, other students, and members of the public.”

While Mt. SAC faculty are held to the same written code of ethics as all College personnel, they also adhere to additional codes of conduct specific to them, such as the collective bargaining agreement between the Faculty Association and the District. Article 18.B.6 requires faculty to “adhere to ethical principles governing interactions with students and colleagues” (I.C.7-2 pg. 67). Article 18C requires faculty to unequivocally accept professional responsibilities that benefit the educational welfare of the College, including the adherence to “ethical principles governing interactions with students and colleagues” (I.C.7-2 pg. 68-71, 85-88).

Mt. SAC faculty who teach distance learning classes are also expected to meet the College’s standards regarding ethical conduct in distance education classes. Administrative Procedure (AP) 7715 is the Faculty Code of Ethics, a “commitment to a set of values guiding the faculty on ethical issues” and is a “protection of freedom to learn and teach and the guarantee of equal educational opportunity for all.” These values ensure a commitment to both students and to the profession. This AP applies to all faculty, including distance learning (I.C.8-7). Since distance learning students typically are not on-campus regularly, ensuring faculty adhere to these principles is paramount to ensuring equal educational opportunity to students.

Training in professional conduct for distance education instructors also occurs through the SPOT (Skills and Pedagogy for Online Teaching) program. SPOT training is required of all faculty prior to teaching online courses and informs instructors about regulations regarding distance learning, including instructor-initiated regular and substantive contact, accessibility requirements, and other regulations and requirements. SPOT training educates online instructors to ensure their commitment to equal educational opportunity.

While Mt. SAC operates under the ideals of academic freedom, faculty are prohibited from expressing personal opinions or creating classwork that would “incite students or others to unlawful acts or to create a clear and present danger to the students and/or the College and/or the community” (I.C.7-2 pg. 88). The consequences to faculty for violations of these ethical standards could be the denial of tenure for probationary tenure-track faculty or disciplinary action by the District. Faculty are also held to the ethical value of academic honesty. Board Policy 4290 states that “Academic dishonesty is unacceptable and will not be tolerated at Mt. San Antonio College” (I.C.8-1). Training in ethics offered through FLEX day workshops such as “Got Ethics?” support faculty in upholding their professional obligations.

Faculty resources related to ethics assistance or intervention include:

  • Behavior and Wellness Intervention Team assists faculty if students are behaving out of the norm in their on-campus or online course. The team is trained to respond appropriately and ethically for a variety of interventions including emotional, behavioral, and physical emergencies.
  • Faculty can refer students privately to tutoring or student services through the faculty self-service portal. Students are notified that they have been referred, and programs with which students are associated are given an early warning, in order to better assist students in a timely manner.
  • Faculty can report students for academic misconduct to the Dean of Student Services. Student Services allows the student a right to representation in a meeting or hearing with several employees to hear his/her case.

Mt. SAC has a Board Policy and Administrative Procedures related to Grievance and Complaint Procedures; Administrative Procedure 5530, Student Rights and Grievances, and Administrative Procedure 3435, Harassment Investigations. AP 5530 delineates that students may file complaints related to academic, non-academic, discrimination, and financial aid challenges. Discrimination complaints and all concerns related to Title IX, 504 Compliance, and Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) may be filed with the College, the California Community College Chancellor’s Office, the Office of Civil Rights, and the Department of Fair Employment and Housing. AP 5530 further specifies that issues that are not resolved at the campus level may be presented to the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC), the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office, or through a petition filed through civil court. This information, including online links to complaints and grievances form is contained in the College catalog. The student handbook also details information related to grievances and complaints.

AP 3435 contains information related to the “responsible College officer” in receiving complaints of discrimination or harassment as well as how and where to file a report related to discrimination and harassment. The College utilizes a collaborative approach between Human Resources, Student Services, and Public Safety to ensure that all reports, allegations, or concerns related to acts of discriminatory treatment, harassment, and sexual harassment or violence are reviewed, investigated, addressed and resolved (III.A.13-6). Appropriate training for both employees and students is coordinated through Human Resources and Student Life. Policies and procedures are regularly reviewed and amended related to federal and state laws and regulations, including Violence Against Women Act, Clery Act, Title IX, Office of Civil Rights, and Americans with Disabilities Act (504 and 508).

The College website, under Student Life, has direct links to forms that students need to access to file grievances and complaints: Student Grievance Form, State of California Complaint Form, ACCJC Complaint Process, Complaint Resolution Information (Human Resources) and Discrimination Information (Chancellor’s Office). The Financial Aid website provides information on filing complaints related to Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act violations by Financial Aid and the Right to Challenge a financial aid decision. Students may file a grievance or complaint about financial aid administration at the College through the Department of Education’s complaint process. The Department of Education works with the student and the college to assign a case number, investigate, and work through the issue. Students may also file financial aid complaints with the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office. A case number is assigned, and the college’s financial aid office is contacted for review and resolution.

Forms and information related to filing grievances and complaints are available in the offices of Student Life, Financial Aid, and the Vice President of Student Services. Student Life, Financial Aid, and Human Resources formally log and track all formal grievances and complaints with updated status and resolution information. The College administration works to review any particular patterns related to grievances and complaints to ensure that de facto discrimination, mistreatment, or inappropriate actions are not occurring. Logs and resolutions of grievances and complaints are maintained and are available for review. Classified employees in California School Employees Association (CSEA) 262 or 651 also have language in their collective bargaining agreement that gives management the right to “Establish and enforce consistent rules of conduct.” Classified employees who violate any of the District’s rules of conduct are subject to disciplinary action in accordance with Board Policy 7365 Discipline of Classified Employees.

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) upholds a written code of professional ethics for all of its personnel, including consequences for violation.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Mt. SAC’s commitment to ethical conduct adopted as a campus wide philosophy is evident through its many codes of ethics.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.C.7-2 Faculty Agreement 2014-17 Year 2 of 3 pg. 68
I.C.7-2 Faculty Agreement 2014-17 Year 2 of 3 pg. 88
I.C.7-2 Faculty Agreement 2014-17 Year 2 of 3 pg. 67
I.C.8-1 BP4290 Academic Honesty
I.C.8-7 AP7715 Faculty Code of Ethics
III.A.13-1 BP2355 Decorum
III.A.13-2 BP2710 Conflict of Interest
III.A.13-3 BP2715 Code of Ethics/Standards of Practice
III.A.13-4 AP2712 Conflict of interest Code
III.A.13-5 BP3050 Institutional Code of Ethics
III.A.13-6 HR Complaint Resolution Page

III.A.14.

The institution plans for and provides all personnel with appropriate opportunities for continued professional development, consistent with the institutional mission and based on evolving pedagogy, technology, and learning needs. The institution systematically evaluates professional development programs and uses the results of these evaluations as the basis for improvement.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

The College Plans for and Provides Opportunities for Professional Development Consistent with the College Mission

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) has a comprehensive Professional Development Plan that reflects a College wide emphasis on professional development for all personnel. The plan supports College goal number ten which states, “The College will encourage and support participation in professional development to strengthen programs and services” (III.A.1-9). The College has invested in campus wide professional development for all employees and has committed resources to support its success. In 2014, Professional and Organizational Development (POD) was moved under the Human Resources Division. In June of 2015, POD was moved back to the Vice President of Instruction. The POD office is staffed with two full-time managers, one for management professional development and the other for classified and faculty professional development, and administrative support staff to provide open access to services. Additionally, the College has committed to ongoing unrestricted general fund budget allocations for POD programs as well as conference and travel funds for all constituencies. A redesign of the POD offices and training rooms includes state-of-the-art technology, a computer learning lab, an open business center for faculty and staff individualized learning, and a multi-function Innovation Room.

The Professional Development Council (PDC) provides direction to the College community to ensure classified staff, faculty, and managers expand their knowledge and skills needed to increase student success and enhance their professional development. The Council is composed of classified, faculty, and management representatives. PDC makes recommendations for professional development at the College, including reporting on campus wide professional development to the President’s Advisory Council. Three committees report to PDC. Each committee represents a different employee classification and their professional development interests:

  • Classified Professional Development Committee (CPDC)
  • Faculty Professional Development Committee (FPDC)
  • Management Professional Development Committee (MPDC)

The Mt. SAC Professional Development Plan was developed using qualitative and quantitative analysis, adhering to legal mandates, Chancellor’s Office guidelines, collective bargaining, meet and confer, and following/maintaining various grant guidelines related to professional development. Data from classified and faculty professional development surveys created by FPDC and CPDC provided members a deeper understanding of employee professional development needs across the College. Results were reviewed by and shared with PDC, CPDC, and FPDC. Representatives from each of these committees are designated with the task of sharing this information with their colleagues, departments, and at union meetings. This information is used as a basis for improving, planning, and implementing professional development consistent with Mt. SAC’s mission and learning needs. Also, in order to maximize the institutional and individual benefits from engagement of employees in professional development, areas of focus in the Professional Development Plan are cross-referenced to the Mt. SAC Strategic Plan, Student Equity Plan, and Student Success Plan.

Input from PDC, FPDC, CPDC, MPDC, Wellness Committee, Health and Safety Committee, Equity Committee, Facilities Planning Summit, Classified Retreat, and Management Retreat is also used to plan for professional development opportunities and resources (III.A.14-1, III.A.14-2, III.A.14-3, III.A.14-4). There is consistent evaluation of professional development events via evaluation after each event and documentation of the information in the College professional development database. Evaluations are administered after each professional development workshop posted on the POD calendar. The data is reviewed and used for planning and improving professional development. The qualitative (e.g. focus groups, committee meetings, summits, and retreats, etc.) along with quantitative (e.g. needs assessments, evaluations, and attendance rates) analysis allow for all personnel to identify appropriate professional development needs that inform the Professional Development Plan and specific professional development offerings (III.A.12-1, III.A.14-5, III.A.14-6).

In 2014, POD worked with the Information Technology (IT) staff to modify the POD database to track and monitor the quality and quantity of professional development workshops and capture attendance information. This learning management system is utilized for promoting professional development opportunities on a calendar for all employees, tracking and monitoring professional development opportunities, and noting descriptions, speakers, dates and times of professional development workshops. Modifications to the database allow POD to categorize workshops based on professional development themes aligned to the Professional Development Plan. Additionally, courses that have been approved for FLEX credit, salary advancement credit, or professional growth increments are identified. Employees that complete courses offered through POD are able to view and/or generate a transcript of their own professional development progress.

Whenever an employee or committee is interested in suggesting or offering a professional development opportunity, the proposal is presented to POD or one of the professional development committees, then agendized by the Professional Development Council. For example, in October, 2014, faculty requested and were granted $100,000 to support professional development activities (III.A.14-4, III.A.14-1, III.A.9-2, III.A.14-7, III.A.9-1). The proposal utilized information from the Vice President of Instruction’s PIE summary and academic division PIE summaries (June 2015), as well as the 2012 faculty needs assessment. The largest concern, stated in every PIE, was the inability to attend conferences for training and recertification. FPDC allocated the funds towards faculty conference and travel and considered all faculty (full-time and part-time) to be equal in applying for use of this funding. The remaining funding was used to support department chair training, the Inspired Teaching Conference (formerly known as Parachutes and Ladders), and a campus wide Lynda.com license to engage all employees in online training on thousands of topics. Over 450 active users have been established, indicating that many employees are taking advantage of this opportunity (III.A.14-1, III.A.14-2, III.A.14-4).

Planning for faculty FLEX days occurs through the coordinated action of a FLEX Task Force, the FLEX Coordinator (Academic Senate Vice President), FPDC, and the POD staff. The College FLEX Plan and state chancellor’s guidelines inform the offerings (III.A.8-15 pg. 3). Evaluations from the prior FLEX days are reviewed by FPDC and the FLEX Task Force within two months of the workshops. Based on the evaluations, training themes are suggested by FPDC to the FLEX Task Force, and the FLEX coordinator sends out a request for proposals with those emphases in mind (III.A.8-14). Proposals from campus members are screened and selected by the FLEX Task Force, and a FLEX agenda is set (III.A.8-7). Workshop announcements are provided to faculty two-to-three months prior to FLEX Day. Faculty sign-up for workshops; in addition, workshops are open to classified, confidentials, and managers. The fall opening meeting for faculty is also attended by managers, and FLEX presenters include faculty, classified, confidentials, and managers.

The collective bargaining agreement between the District and California School Employee Association (CSEA) 262 specifies that one non-instructional day each year be designated as Classified Professional Development Day for the purpose of staff development activities (III.A.14-8). CPDC held the first annual Classified Professional Development Day in August 2016. A CPD Day Task Force planned the day, modeling it on the successful Faculty FLEX Day structure. The task force focused on implementation of the Classified Professional Development Plan and reviewed data from a current needs assessment survey to identify professional development focused pathways for the day. Proposals from campus were screened by the task force to establish workshops within these pathways that classified staff then had the opportunity to attend. Additional partial-day workshops are also offered during the year.

The CSEA 262 collective bargaining agreement also provides funding for an annual Great Staff Retreat. The Great Staff Retreat was reinstituted in spring 2016 and is a professional development opportunity that provides classified employees with inspiration and professional growth. It allows for employees to examine and communicate problems faced in their working environment. The Great Staff Retreat is designed to create dialogue on areas of emphasis including employee engagement and motivation, team building, leadership, effective communication, and a better understanding of other job roles. Employees are encouraged to develop realistic and usable solutions to discussed issues (III.A.14-9, III.A.14-10).

Technology training was one of the primary needs identified in 2012, through a campus needs assessment. The IT department has a full-time trainer who provides monthly training opportunities in the use of campus wide technology tools such as Banner, Argos, OnBase, and Lotus Notes. Faculty and other employees can receive Moodlerooms training and SPOT training for online delivery of course content. This is provided by the Online Learning Support Center and the Distance Learning Team composed of faculty and classified staff. OmniUpdate training to program in the College’s web database is offered to all employees regularly. Adobe Learning Suite training and Microsoft Office Suite training are offered as needed; additionally, online training videos available through lynda.com can be accessed by employees at any time.

Health and safety training was another primary need identified in 2012. The Wellness Center has been offering a Lunch and Learn series about health and wellness regularly at the classified and confidential lunch hour. The Health and Safety Committee has offered online active-shooter training to all employees and has established October as Disaster Training month. In 2014, a week of offerings was provided, and in 2015, a month of workshops and training was provided for disaster awareness and prevention (III.A.14-11). Emergency Preparedness training continues to evolve each year as specialized training needs become apparent.

Orientations of new employees are a priority. Orientation of new part-time faculty is done on a department and division level. Most departments train on FLEX day and provide extensive information to new and ongoing part-time faculty. Departments provide training on specialized equipment as part of the initial orientation. In an effort to systematically support part-time faculty, adjunct instructors are invited to attend each of two FLEX days and are paid for up to two hours of training at each day. New faculty (full-time, one-year or tenure track) are invited to participate in the New Faculty Seminar trainings, which occur on Fridays twelve times throughout the year. The training orients faculty to the campus, to teaching pedagogy, and to the tenure process. Training is provided by many individuals on campus, and coordinated by a new faculty coordinator, who is a faculty member with reassigned time. In June 2016 the Academic Senate created a New Faculty Seminar Task Force to review the effectiveness of the current New Faculty Seminar and make recommendations for ongoing improvements as needed (III.A.14-7). Classified New Employee Welcome Orientations will now be offered as part of the collective bargaining agreement (III.A.14-12). The one-day training orients classified and confidentials to campus, gives insight to campus infrastructure, and introduces employees to many campus managers.

The College Systematically Evaluates Professional Development Programs and Uses the Results for Improvement

Mt. SAC identifies teaching and learning needs to inform faculty development opportunities. For example, the Online Learning Support Center (a faculty resource) conducted a survey focused on whether the College should adopt the Canvas learning management system (a state-subsidized tool through the Online Education Initiative) and whether faculty was interested in using Google tools and email in their teaching. The results from such faculty surveys are used in committee meetings and annual planning processes to respond to faculty with targeted activities as soon as possible. Furthermore, the Distance Learning Committee conducted a mock accreditation review. Seventeen faculty members volunteered to have their distance learning courses reviewed by faculty reviewers from the College and other colleges. The results were used by faculty mentors who followed -up with faculty on making improvements to their distance learning courses. Additionally, follow-up meetings were held with departments and divisions to better understand faculty needs for further development and support. Outcomes workshops offered at FLEX Day and through POD directly support faculty in the effort to develop and assess student learning outcomes in the distance education mode. The Outcomes Committee members have also conducted department specific training workshops.

Mt. SAC is currently designing and implementing a professional learning academy for faculty. The focus of this work is development of learning activities appropriate for professional growth credit that advance the objectives of the Campus Equity Plan and align with the Professional Development Plan. This academy will provide diversity training and professional development for faculty and where appropriate will structure broader learning opportunities for classified staff and managers as well. A Faculty Professional Learning Coordination Team has engaged in research of best practices and is collaborating with FPDC, PDC, and POD to implement learning activities beginning in the 2016-17 academic year (III.A.14-13, III.A.14-14).

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) plans for and provides all personnel with appropriate opportunities for continued professional development, consistent with the College mission and based on evolving pedagogy, technology, and learning needs. The College systematically evaluates professional development programs and uses the results of these evaluations as the basis for improvement.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • The Mt. SAC Professional Development Plan implementation reflects a College wide emphasis on professional development for all personnel.
  • Collaboration of the Faculty Professional Learning Coordination Team with Professional and Organizational Development to design and implement a professional learning academy supports learning needs of faculty and broad learning opportunities for staff and managers as well

List of Evidence

Title Content
III.A.1-9 Professional Development Day - Know Your Rights 2-12-2015
III.A.8-7 FLEX Opening Meeting
III.A.8-14 Emails Announcing FLEX
III.A.8-15 Academic Senate Minutes 5-19-2016 pg. 3
III.A.9-1 Budget Committee Minutes
III.A.9-2 PAC Minutes Website
III.A.12-1 POD Attendance, Sign-in sheets, and Evaluation
III.A.14-1 PDC Minutes
III.A.14-2 Academic Senate PDC Report
III.A.14-3 CPDC Minutes
III.A.14-4 FPDC Minutes
III.A.14-5 POD Evaluation of Classified Evaluation Day
III.A.14-6 Classified Professional Development Day Needs Assessment and POD survey
III.A.14-7 Academic Senate Minutes
III.A.14-8 Classified Professional Development Day
III.A.14-9 Great Staff Retreat Flyer
III.A.14-10 Great Staff Retreat Application
III.A.14-11 POD Disaster Awareness
III.A.14-12 Classified New Employee Welcome
III.A.14-13 PDC Planning Retreat 2016
III.A.14-14 Faculty Professional Learning Coordination Team Proposal

III.A.15.

The institution makes provision for the security and confidentiality of personnel records. Each employee has access to his/her personnel records in accordance with law.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Mt. San Antonio College’s (Mt. SAC’s) Administrative Procedure 7145 provides for the security and confidentiality of personnel records (III.A.15-1, III.A.15-2). Additionally, the collective bargaining agreements include language about the confidentiality of grievances and the personnel file. Human Resources (HR) maintains official personnel files in a centralized, secured location. Access to these personnel files is restricted to authorized HR staff members. Each employee has the right to inspect or obtain a copy of his/her personnel records as outlined in AP 7145. HR is the designated custodian of employee personnel files and maintains strict procedures regarding access to the files. Additionally, the Office of Human Resources is secured with its own key to increase security.

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College’s (Mt. SAC’s) procedures and practices are in compliance with Labor Code Section 1198.5 and California Education Code Section 87031. Personnel files are maintained in a centralized, secured location, accessible only to authorized individuals. Each employee has access to his/her personnel records in accordance with law.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Human Resources maintains central personnel files in a locked office within HR.
  • Every employee has the right to inspect his/her records as outlined in Administrative Procedure 7145.

List of Evidence

Title Content
III.A.15-1 Personnel Files: Ed Code 87031
III.A.15-2 California Labor Code Section 1198.5