Facebook Pixel Code
Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Support Services

Standard II.A. Instructional Programs

II.A.1.

All instructional programs, regardless of location or means of delivery, including distance education and correspondence education, are offered in fields of study consistent with the institution’s mission, are appropriate to higher education, and culminate in student attainment of identified student learning outcomes, and achievement of degrees, certificates, employment, or transfer to other higher education programs. (ER 9 and ER 11)

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

All Instruction Programs are Offered in Fields of Study Consistent with the Mission

All instructional programs at Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) are offered in fields of study consistent with the College mission (I.A.1-2). The College Goals are derived directly from this mission and form the basis for all instructional planning for both credit and noncredit programs, with the Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC), a shared-governance committee, facilitating that integration (I.A.1-2, I.A.1-3, I.A.3-6, II.A.1-1). The College provides transfer courses and programs, career technical education, foundation skills, noncredit courses, and community education to the communities it serves. Credit courses are offered in the traditional (on-campus), hybrid, and distance learning modes while non-credit and community education courses are offered both on campus and at sites within the District.

Programs are Appropriate to Higher Education

The appropriateness of instructional programs at Mt. SAC results from College goals and is informed by strategic planning through an institutionalized and comprehensive course and program development and review process. Mt. SAC Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs have strong industry advisories that ensure these programs are meeting industry needs. CTE transfer programs have strong advisory committees that ensure academic programs lead to transferable degrees that meet higher education requirements and focus on students transferring to four-year programs. All course and program outlines, supplemental forms, and attachments are held in WebCMS (I.C.3-1). The public portal makes all approved Course Outlines of Record and program information accessible to any member of the public, including faculty, students, and the community. Administrative access is provided to faculty, department chairs, division managers, members of the Educational Design Committee (EDC), and curriculum support staff at different stages of the curriculum (or course and program) approval process. In the development and review process, appropriateness is ensured at many levels, including the following: the faculty authors who submit the course or program, departments and department chairs, division management, the faculty curriculum liaisons and technical review pre-screeners assigned by the Academic Senate, EDC, the faculty articulation officer who sits on EDC and the Curriculum and Instruction Council, (C&I) the Mt. SAC Board of Trustees, and the Chancellor’s Office (I.B.1-33, II.A.1-2, I.B.1-32, II.A.1-3). In addition, CTE advisory boards work with CTE faculty to suggest modifications and updates to curriculum and programs to ensure they meet rigorous industry standards in preparation for employment.

Programs Culminate in Student Achievement of Learning Outcomes

Approved instructional programs at Mt. SAC result, first, in student attainment of learning outcomes. The development and assessment of outcomes is systematic and embedded in all areas of the College that deal directly with student learning and assessment. This commitment to the development and assessment of learning outcomes is clearly communicated to the campus community and the broader public through several webpages accessible from the College’s main webpage (II.A.1-4). The public location of student learning outcomes (SLOs) statements is also accessible from that main outcomes webpage and all course and program outlines are available in the WebCMS public portal (II.A.1-5). Specific data regarding student achievement of SLOs is located in the College’s TracDat system where instructional departments record their SLOs, criteria for success, means of assessment, and use of results (I.B.2-6). All programs are required to create and assess program level outcomes (PLOs). SLOs from courses within the programs are directly mapped to the PLOs. PLO statements are tracked to courses in the program in which the PLO is introduced, achieved, and/or mastered. Data from these course SLOs are compiled to assess student achievement of PLOs (II.A.1-6, II.A.1-7).

Programs Culminate in Student Achievement of Broader Measures

Attainment of Mt. SAC SLOs also results in broader measures of student achievement including degrees, certificates, and licensures (II.A.1-8, I.A.1-5, I.A.1-6, II.A.1-9, II.A.1-10, II.A.1-11, II.A.1-12, II.A.1-13, II.A.1-14). Noncredit and community education offerings provide students with alternative paths to demonstrate goal attainment. Noncredit students can earn Chancellor’s Office approved certificates to prepare for college and/or employment. Certificates of Completion and Certificates of Competency can be earned in English as a Second Language, Adult Basic Education, and Short-term Vocational programs. Furthermore, incumbent workers, unemployed, and underemployed individuals can upgrade skills for immediate employment through contract and fee-based education in a variety of employment fields (I.C.1-21 pg. 12-34).

Analysis and Evaluation

All instructional programs at Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC), regardless of location or means of delivery, are offered in fields of study consistent with the College’s mission, are appropriate to higher education, and culminate in student attainment of identified learning outcomes and achievement of degrees, certificates, employment, or transfer to other higher education programs. Based on the narrative above, the College meets Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges Eligibility Requirement 9 and 11.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • The work of Mt. SAC is driven first and foremost by its mission.
  • The appropriateness of instructional programs at Mt. SAC is ensured through an institutionalized and comprehensive course and program development and review process that includes all relevant constituents.
  • Approved instructional programs at Mt. SAC result in student attainment of learning outcomes.
  • Attainment of Mt. SAC SLOs also results in broader measures of student achievement.
  • Noncredit and community education programs offer students a variety of options to accomplish learning and career goals.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.A.1-2 Mission, Vision, Core Values
I.A.1-3 College Goals
I.A.1-5 Fast Facts Flier
I.A.1-6 Continuing Education Division Fast Facts
I.A.3-6 Institutional Effectiveness Committee Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.1-32 Curriculum and Instruction Council Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.1-33 Educational Design Committee Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.2-6 TracDat Login Page
I.C.1-21 School of Continuing Education Student Handbook pg. 12-34
I.C.3-1 WebCMS Webpage
II.A.1-1 Integrated Planning
II.A.1-2 AP4050 Articulation
II.A.1-3 Chancellor’s Office Program and Course Approval Handbook
II.A.1-4 Outcomes Assessment Homepage
II.A.1-5 SLO by Certificate, Degree, and Discipline
II.A.1-6 Theatre PLO Mapping Example
II.A.1-7 Photography PLO Mapping Example
II.A.1-8 Data Mart - Program Awards Summary Report 2013-14
II.A.1-9 Licensure Exam Pass Rates 2013-14
II.A.1-10 Student Longitudinal Outcomes Tracking System
II.A.1-11 Data Mart - Award Recipient Wages
II.A.1-12 Radiologic Technology Program Effectiveness Data
II.A.1-13 Alumni Survey Highlights Awardees 2011-12
II.A.1-14 Alumni Survey Highlights Awardees 2012-13

II.A.2.

Faculty, including full -time, part-time, and adjunct faculty, ensure that the content and methods of instruction meet generally accepted academic and professional standards and expectations. Faculty and others responsible act to continuously improve instructional courses, programs and directly related services through systematic evaluation to assure currency, improve teaching and learning strategies, and promote student success.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Assurance that Content and Instruction Methods meet Standards and Expectations

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) has several processes, activities, and groups that are institutionalized to ensure high-quality courses and programs that are appropriate to higher education and lead to degrees, certificates, and transfer. There is a clear institutional commitment to academic standards, currency, and systematic review and improvement of instructional courses and programs. All curriculum is reviewed by the Educational Design Committee (EDC) and Curriculum and Instruction Council (C&I). When courses are brought forward for offering as distance education, the Distance Learning Committee first screens all proposals. The approved Course Outline of Record serves as the source document informing full-time and adjunct faculty of required content. The Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC) is committed to reviewing mechanisms of instructional improvement (I.A.3-6). The Academic Senate maintains a Content Review Implementation Plan and also supports student level outcomes (SLOs) and program learning outcomes (PLOs) (II.A.2-1, II.A.2-2, II.A.2-3). The College’s Administrative Procedure (AP) 4020 focuses on program and curriculum development (I.B.2-2). The College also follows the Chancellor’s Office Program and Course Approval Handbook (II.A.1-3 pg. 143-144) and the State Academic Senate paper “Ensuring Effective Curriculum Approval Processes: A Guide for Local Senates” (II.A.2-4).

Act to Continuously Improve through Systematic Evaluation

The commitment to academic standards and guidelines for review are systematically operationalized in several ways. The Outcomes Committee is a shared governance committee that is designed to monitor, coordinate, and evaluate outcomes efforts across the College, including learning outcomes (I.B.5-9). The EDC is a shared governance committee that facilitates a review process of course and program content, quality, and modes of delivery. This information is recorded in its online system, WebCMS, and described on the EDC webpage (I.B.1-33, I.C.3-1). This process also includes a systematic assessment of SLOs (II.A.2-5). C&I is also a shared governance group that further reviews courses and programs, ensuring appropriateness of the curriculum and program to the mission, goals, and the overall program priorities of the College (I.B.1-32). Through a two-year program review, informed by significant input from advisory boards, CTE programs include an additional systematic evaluation to ensure course and program currency.

Mt. SAC’s Planning for Institutional Effectiveness (PIE) process serves as its program review. Each instructional department and division engages in a comprehensive, annual planning process that includes the deliberate consideration of how instructional programs can be improved in order to optimize student success (II.A.2-6). The resulting considerations and the planning decisions are recorded in detail at the department level, initially summarized at the division level, and then ultimately summarized at the Vice President and institutional levels (II.A.2-7). At each level, this information provides program improvement and, ultimately, institutional planning for quality and appropriateness.

A significant portion of the planning discussion includes faculty discussion of course and program outcomes in relation to improvement. Much of this discussion occurs within department and division meetings, especially in relation to how to use the results of SLO and PLO assessments. The Vice President of Instruction’s PIE Summary report is a good example of the categories of activities and data are that are engaged at each level of this planning process in order to ensure broad and comprehensive attention to student success (II.A.2-7).

Faculty commitment to pedagogical development and student learning is evident in the scheduling of bi-annual FLEX development days for full-time and adjunct faculty (II.A.2-8). The establishment of the Faculty Professional Development Committee (FPDC) and the inclusion of conference and training funding for full-time faculty in the faculty/district collective bargaining agreement have helped in that endeavor (II.A.2-9, I.C.7-2 pg. 26) Faculty professional development through Professional and Organizational Development (POD) includes classes and workshops in the areas of pedagogy and technology, among others (II.A.2-10, II.A.2-11). Additionally, faculty commitment to teaching and learning is evident in the establishment of Faculty Inquiry Groups (FIGs) and in the participation in Title V activities. Student Equity funds have been committed to the establishment of a Professional Learning Academy designed and led by faculty to promote teaching excellence. The faculty performance review process includes considerations of pedagogy and support of student success that are crucial and imbedded (I.C.7-2 pg. 26). Besides faculty discussions of curriculum/program development and outcomes assessment, the discussion of pedagogy, student learning, and student success occurs consistently in the administrative activities surrounding the faculty performance review process.

The Faculty Association’s recommended process of evaluation lists performance expectations and responsibilities for all full-time and part-time faculty members. Some of these responsibilities include regular faculty involvement in staff and professional development activities in order to increase professional expertise in both subject matter and teaching techniques. In addition, one of the primary expectations is that faculty teach their subject matter in compliance with the current Course Outline of Record (I.C.7-2 pg. 26).

Improve Teaching and Learning Strategies

Both within and in addition to the curriculum, program, and institutional planning processes described above, faculty are also involved in several activities which require their consideration of competency levels, learning styles, and multiple assessments of student learning. There is an institutional commitment to pedagogical development and student learning. The faculty contract includes in its teaching faculty performance expectancies a requirement, “to develop and utilize effective pedagogical techniques in order to enhance the communication of ideas and promote optimal student learning, critical thinking, and performance skills” (I.C.7-2 pg. 26). The faculty evaluation process is taken seriously by both administrators and faculty. Receipt of tenure requires that probationary faculty demonstrate engaging pedagogy, assessment methodology, exam construction, and grading rubric development skills. When a tenure review team identifies prescriptives (recommendations for improvement), positive responses are required in order for the individual to continue to the next year. Professional and Organizational Development (POD) training/workshops for full-time and adjunct faculty are often focused on student learning styles and assessment (II.A.2-12). The Title V grant has offered three years of professional development for faculty (II.A.2-13).

Additionally, there is POD conference and travel funding for full-time and adjunct faculty as well as funding for the annual Developmental Education Conference, just completing its fourteenth year (a major activity focusing on developmental pedagogy and learning styles) (II.A.2-14, II.A.2-15).

Analysis and Evaluation

All faculty at Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) ensure that the content and methods of instruction meet generally accepted academic and professional standards and expectations. Faculty and others responsible act to continuously improve courses, programs and related services through systematic evaluation to assure currency, improve teaching and learning strategies, and promote student success.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Mt. SAC has a clear commitment to academic standards, currency, and systematic review and improvement of instructional courses and programs.
  • The commitment to academic standards and guidelines for review are systematically operationalized.
  • Mt. SAC’s Planning for Institutional Effectiveness (PIE) process serves as its program review.
  • A significant portion of the planning discussion includes faculty discussion of course and program outcomes in relation to improvement.
  • Faculty are also involved in several activities within which they consider competency levels, learning styles, and multiple assessments of student learning.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.A.3-6 Institutional Effectiveness Committee Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.1-32 Curriculum and Instruction Council Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.1-33 Educational Design Committee Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.2-2 AP4020 Program and Curriculum Development
I.B.5-9 Outcomes Committee Purpose, Function, and Members
I.C.3-1 WebCMS Webpage
I.C.7-2 Faculty Agreement 2014-17 Year 2 of 3 pg. 26
II.A.1-3 Chancellor’s Office Program and Course Approval Handbook pg. 143-144
II.A.2-1 Academic Senate Content Review Form
II.A.2-2 Academic Senate SLO Resolution 07-2011
II.A.2-3 Academic Senate PLO Resolution 06-2013
II.A.2-4 Academic Senate for California Community Colleges - Curriculum Approval Processes Guide
II.A.2-5 Educational Design Committee Deadlines and Curriculum Information
II.A.2-6 Business Division Minutes 9-15-2016
II.A.2-7 Vice President of Instruction PIE 2015-16
II.A.2-8 Spring FLEX Day Schedule 2016
II.A.2-9 Faculty Professional Development Council Purpose, Function, and Members
II.A.2-10 Assessing and Responding to Non-Native English Speakers' Writing Workshop Registration
II.A.2-11 Accommodating Students with Disabilities in the Classroom Workshop Registration
II.A.2-12 Professional and Organizational Development Homepage
II.A.2-13 Faculty Development on Title V Revised
II.A.2-14 Professional & Organizational Development Funding Process
II.A.2-15 Developmental Education Parachutes and Ladders Flier 2016

II.A.3.

The institution identifies and regularly assesses learning outcomes for courses, programs, certificates and degrees using established institutional procedures. The institution has officially approved current course outlines that include student learning outcomes. In every class section, students receive a course syllabus that includes learning outcomes from the institution’s officially approved course outline.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

SLOs are Identified

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) uses two types of learning outcomes created for courses; together, they form the course-level outcomes for curricula development. Measurable objectives (MOs) and student learning outcomes (SLOs) stand as the criteria for success in a course. MOs are all of the outcomes that a student will meet, or learn, in a given course. SLOS may be derived from MOs in order to achieve more specific assessment and analysis. A department determines the SLOs through a discussion about what it wants to focus on for strengthening student success. Once a department has determined its SLOs, a rubric is created and criteria for success is established. The SLOs are then assessed on a regular cycle. The results of the assessments are collected and discussed at a department meeting, and the discussion leads to using the results of the assessment for improvement. The use of results might lead to a reassessment of the current SLOs after a determined pedagogical or curricular change, or it might lead to choosing different SLOs to assess in the next cycle. The end result of each cycle of this process is indicative of the College culture that focuses on improvement in teaching and learning (II.A.3-1).

Program level outcomes (PLOs) and institutional level outcomes (ILOs) also result in student success data. All of the course level outcomes (MOs and SLOs) are linked to at least one broader PLO, and all PLOs are linked to at least one ILO (I.B.1-24).

MOs are an essential element in the creation of any course and are identified in several sources, including the Chancellor’s Office Program and Course Approval handbook, the State Academic Senate Curriculum Guide, and the Academic Senate Content Review Implementation Plan (II.A.3-2, II.A.3-3, II.A.2-1). Each of these sources informs the processes used by several shared governance committees across campus to vet course curricula, including learning outcomes.

As a course is developed and MOs are created, SLOs are also identified. Learning outcomes are clearly defined and described on the Outcomes Committee webpage, including: SLOs, PLOs, and ILOs (II.A.3-4, II.A.3-5, II.A.1-4, I.A.1-30). Like MOs, SLOs are established based on a general and systematic institutional commitment. In October 2013, the Outcomes Committee began to engage the College in a process of “reimagining” existing general education outcomes, framing them instead as a competency-based structure which yielded identification of both PLOs and ILOs (II.A.3-6, II.A.3-7, II.A.3-8 pg. 3-5, II.A.3-9). Mt. SAC has further clarified its commitment to SLO assessment with institutional explanation and faculty support statements (II.A.3-10, II.A.3-11).

All Course Outlines are Approved and Current and Include SLOs

When new, modified, or four-year review courses are submitted for review and approval to the Educational Design Committee (EDC), they must include MOs as well as SLOs. The development and assessment of outcomes (MOs, SLOs, PLOs, and ILOs) remains the responsibility of the faculty. Initial development of MOs and SLOs is accomplished through the curriculum development process described in II.A.2 (through EDC and C&I) and is based on statewide regulations and guidelines resulting in locally derived processes. In addition, SLO development is supported and guided by intentional institutional planning (I.A.1-30, II.A.3-12, II.A.3-13). SLOs are supported by the Academic Senate (II.A.2-2, II.A.2-3).

Adjunct faculty also participate in outcomes processes. Opportunities for adjuncts to participate in outcomes work were initially supported by funding through the College President’s Office (II.A.3-14). Adjunct faculty are now guaranteed funding, through the 2014-2017 district/association collective bargaining agreement, to participate in outcomes work on campus (I.C.7-2 pg. 41). Inclusion of adjunct faculty has enriched the outcomes discussion and extended the impact of findings from data analysis, thus impacting a greater number of students.

SLOs on Syllabi Reinforces Institutionalization of SLOs

Outcomes are institutionalized at Mt. SAC because they are directly connected to courses. Currently, MOs and SLOs are created for every new course, approved by departments, documented in the minutes, then forwarded to EDC (I.A.1-30). Learning outcomes are also “mapped,” demonstrating the connection between course level outcomes, PLOs and ILOs. Mapping is the process of identifying the connection of each course level learning outcome to a corresponding PLO. Once completed, every PLO is linked to at least one course level outcome. Course and program outcomes are then mapped to ILOs, again assuring that all ILOs are assessed on a regular and ongoing cycle (I.B.1-24, II.A.3-9). Students have access to outcomes for their courses and programs via the WebCMS public portal on all course and program outlines and via their course syllabi (II.A.3-15, I.C.3-1, II.A.1-5).

SLOs are Regularly Assessed

Learning outcomes at Mt. SAC are regularly and verifiably assessed. MOs are reviewed as part of the standard curriculum review process every four years. This process follows the same steps as the curriculum development process described above. Although this review is required every four years, faculty can submit revisions to any Course Outline of Record at any time. These can include revisions to all or any associated outcomes (MOs, SLOs, PLOs). SLOs are also assessed and reviewed every four years in a separate process based on a required SLO rotation plan created by each department (I.A.1-30, II.A.3-16). Outcomes data is then entered into TracDat (I.B.2-6, II.A.3-17). Courses/programs are deactivated if outcomes are not assessed within five years (I.B.2-2).

Progress with outcomes assessment is verified in several ways. All SLO assessments are verified through the SLO reports webpage (II.A.1-5, II.A.3-18). All PLO assessments are verified through the use of the PLO Reports webpage (II.A.3-19, II.A.3-20). Additionally, ongoing assessment is verified for degrees and certificates through the SLO output display (II.A.3-21).

SLO evaluation is part of the full-time faculty expectancies which require faculty to maintain current knowledge of department assessment activities and curriculum development. These activities are reported through the Yearly Report of Service to College Form on which faculty report their participation in a variety of supplemental activities across the year, including outcomes work (I.C.7-2 pg. 163). A significant portion of faculty SLO work includes discussion of course and program outcomes data at the department level, with an emphasis on how to improve student learning. The VP PIE Summary: Instruction (2013-14) report is a good example of how those discussions result in improvement across the instructional areas of the College. Entire sections of the department-level planning document, the division summary planning document, and the Vice President’s summary planning document clearly display the consideration of assessment results and how those results are specifically used to improve student learning. For example, after examining assessment data, the English Department changed how writing assignments were standardized across courses, the Psychology Department changed pedagogy and assessment methods, and the Sociology/Philosophy Department developed rubrics for instruction (II.A.3-22, II.A.3-23, II.A.3-24, II.A.3-25 pg 28-42).

Analysis and Evaluation

Using established procedures, Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) identifies and regularly assesses learning outcomes for courses, programs, certificates and degrees. All courses at the College have been officially approved and current course outlines include SLOs. In every class section, students receive a course syllabus that includes learning outcomes from the officially approved course outline.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • MOs and SLOs stand as the criteria for success in courses at Mt. SAC.
  • When new courses are submitted for review and approval, they must include both MOs as well as SLOs.
  • Adjunct faculty participate in outcomes processes.
  • Outcomes are institutionalized at Mt. SAC.
  • Students have access to outcomes for courses and programs via the web and their course syllabi.
  • Learning outcomes at Mt. SAC are regularly and verifiably assessed.
  • The discussion of how outcomes assessment can be used to positively affect student learning occurs at the department level.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.A.1-30 Outcomes Plan 2012-2020
I.B.1-24 Summary Report for ILO Mapping 8-2016
I.B.2-2 AP4020 Program and Curriculum Development
I.B.2-6 TracDat Login Page
I.C.3-1 WebCMS Webpage
I.C.7-2 Faculty Agreement 2014-17 Year 2 of 3 pg. 41
I.C.7-2 Faculty Agreement 2014-17 Year 2 of 3 pg. 163
II.A.1-4 Outcomes Assessment Homepage
II.A.1-5 SLO by Certificate, Degree, and Discipline
II.A.2-1 Academic Senate Content Review Form
II.A.2-2 Academic Senate SLO Resolution 07-2011
II.A.2-3 Academic Senate PLO Resolution 06-2013
II.A.3-1 Example of SLO Course Rotation Plan
II.A.3-2 The Course Outline of Record: A Curriculum Reference Guide
II.A.3-3 State Academic Senate Curriculum Guide
II.A.3-4 What is a Student Learning Outcome?
II.A.3-5 What is a Program Level Outcome?
II.A.3-6 Institutional Level Outcomes
II.A.3-7 Outcomes Committee - General Education Outcomes Re-Imagined PowerPoint
II.A.3-8 Outcomes Committee - General Education Outcomes Re-Imagined Report pg. 3-5
II.A.3-9 Institutional Level Outcomes Explained
II.A.3-10 What is Outcomes Assessment and Why Do It?
II.A.3-11 Video Link - Professor Jonathan Hymer’s speech - Why Do We Assess
II.A.3-12 Appendix C - SLO Checklist
II.A.3-13 Example of SLO Checklist: Theater SLO Review
II.A.3-14 Financial Resources for Assessment
II.A.3-15 SLO Syllabi Example 1
II.A.3-16 Example of SLO Rotation Plan - Learning Assistance
II.A.3-17 Course Report- Electronics & Computer Technology
II.A.3-18 Student Learning Outcomes - Report Detail
II.A.3-19 Program Level Outcomes Reports
II.A.3-20 Arts - Program Detailed Report
II.A.3-21 Student Learning Outcomes - Output Display Webpage
II.A.3-22 Program Review - AmLa Outcomes Assessment
II.A.3-23 PIE - Psychology Outcomes 2014
II.A.3-24 Outcomes Assessment for Humanities and Social Sciences 2013-14
II.A.3-25 Vice President of Instruction PIE 2014-15 pg. 28-42

II.A.4.

If the institution offers pre-collegiate level curriculum, it distinguishes that curriculum from college-level curriculum and directly supports students in learning the knowledge and skills necessary to advance to and succeed in college level curriculum.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Pre-Collegiate Level Curriculum is Offered

Courses and programs at Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) are developed and assessed through a shared governance process, based on Board Policy (BP) 4020 and Administrative Procedure (AP) 4020 (I.B.2-2, II.A.4-1). The process begins with identification of a need and moves to the collaborative development of curricula by faculty and administration (usually division management). The need may be informed by input from advisory committees, changes in four-year program content, or direct response to outcomes assessment analysis. During this process, prerequisites are established and the determination between course types, including pre-collegiate and collegiate, is determined and entered into the curriculum development and review system, WebCMS (I.C.3-1).

Pre-collegiate level reading, math, and English curricula are offered in the Learning Assistance, American Language (AMLA), Math, and English departments. The credit courses in these departments are one, two, or three levels below transfer and serve as pre-requisites for other courses in the sequence that lead to transferable, college-level coursework.

Tutoring support is available to all students in pre-collegiate courses at the Learning Assistance Center, tutorial services within the Learning Assistance Department, the Writing Center, and the Math Activities Resource Center (MARC). In addition to tutoring, students may also have supplemental instructors in their classes, who further support students in learning the knowledge and skills needed to be successful in collegiate-level courses. Additionally, the Writing Center offers a Tutor in the Classroom program at all levels for pre-collegiate and collegiate-level English courses.

The School of Continuing Education offers students viable options for completing pre-collegiate coursework. Noncredit courses and programs below college level are available to assist students for success in both employment and/or college-level coursework. These come in the form of test preparation boot camps, contextualized math remediation for health care courses, and vocational English as a Second Language. Furthermore, beginning in March 2013, School of Continuing Education participated in a regional planning consortium with K-12 partners to create an Adult Education Regional Plan to address gaps, align services, and promote pathways. College faculty, administrators, and staff evaluated regional data and adult education needs to identify current levels of services and future program offerings. As a result, various pre-collegiate noncredit basic skills and vocational coursework and programs have been developed. These include new course and program offerings such as Basic Skills Biology, Physical Therapy Aide, and Electronics Systems Technology (II.A.4-2).

The College Distinguishes between Pre-Collegiate and College-Level Curriculum

Pre-collegiate and college-level curriculum are distinguished in Course Outline of Record (COR), the College catalog, and the class schedule. Course status as degree applicable or non-degree applicable is indicated on the COR. Once a course is approved as degree applicable or non-degree applicable, this information is printed in the catalog and the class schedule as well.

Prerequisites may also serve to distinguish between pre-collegiate and collegiate coursework (II.A.2-1, II.A.4-3, II.A.4-4). These prerequisites are informed by both Title 5 and the Chancellor’s Office Program and Course Approval Handbook (II.A.4-5, II.A.1-3 pg. 143-144). Prerequisites are determined by a content review process in which the exit skills of the prerequisite course are aligned with the skills needed to achieve the learning outcomes of the subsequent course.

Once developed by faculty and reviewed by the appropriate division, curriculum is forwarded to the Educational Design Committee (EDC), which is an Academic Senate committee, via the College’s curriculum system, WebCMS (I.B.1-33). Once EDC ensures Title 5 compliance, curriculum moves forward to the Curriculum and Instruction Council (C&I), an Academic Senate Council (I.B.1-32). C&I reviews EDC curriculum recommendations, focusing on how the course or program fits into the overall College mission, goals, and regulations, including the consideration of course type (degree applicable or non-degree applicable). This entire curriculum process is supported by annual training, offered to faculty, department chairs, and managers, sponsored by both the Academic Senate and Office of Instruction, and facilitated by the C&I chair and Associate Vice President of Instruction (II.A.4-6, II.A.4-7).

The College Supports Students in Moving From Pre-Collegiate to College-Level Curriculum

Prerequisites are used to successfully transition students from pre-collegiate courses to collegiate courses in the composition sequence. A diagram from the schedule of classes (see figure II.A. 4.-1) provides an overview of how students matriculate from pre-collegiate writing courses to the first collegiate-level writing course, English (ENGL) 1A (II.A.4-8). There are several entry points as a result of the initial placement process (AWE—Assessment of Written English). Once placed, students matriculate from one course to a subsequent level course. All of this post-assessment matriculation occurs based on prerequisites established for each subsequent course. It is important to note the various designations of Mt. SAC’s courses:

  • ESL is the non-credit English as a Second Language program;
  • AmLa is the American Language pre-collegiate, credit ESL program,
  • LERN is the pre-collegiate credit Learning Assistance program; and
  • ENGL is the pre-collegiate and collegiate credit English composition and literature program.

Figure II.A.4-1 is a flow chart that shows the course progression a student may follow to advance towards college level English and beyond.
Long Description
Figure II.A.4.-1. English Placement and Sequence

For example, the diagram illustrates three ways students can enter ENGL 67 (two levels below collegiate): 1) place into ENGL 67 through the AWE, 2) matriculate from LERN 81, or 3) matriculate from AMLA 42W. The Course Outline of Record (COR) for ENGL 67 includes those vetted prerequisites (II.A.4-9). However, in order to be eligible to enroll in ENGL 1A (first collegiate-level writing course), students have only two options: 1) place through the AWE, or 2) matriculate from ENGL 68. The COR for ENGL 1A verifies the establishment of those prerequisites. (II.A.4-10).

A similar process is also available for students to review for mathematics sequence. A diagram from the schedule of classes (see figure II.A.4.-2) provides an overview of how students matriculate from pre-collegiate math courses to the first collegiate-level math course and beyond. Students can enter into LERN 48 without a placement, place into a math course based on the College’s locally-developed math placement assessment, or otherwise progress by matriculating from one course to the next in the sequence based on prerequisites established for each successive course. Completion of MATH 70 or MATH 71 meets the local degree requirement, while completion of MATH 100 or higher is necessary for transfer programs.

In addition to course sequencing, the College supports student movement from pre-collegiate basic skills courses to college-level curriculum through implementation of learning communities and student academic support services. The College has implemented several strategies that are based on collaboration between Student Services and Instruction. Learning communities that integrate student support services (counseling, advising, peer mentoring, tutoring, supplemental instruction, and study groups) with instruction in English, reading, and math have been highly successful. The Pathways to Transfer efforts allow students to seamlessly enroll in the required sequence of basic skills and general education courses needed for graduation and transfer, enabling students to meet their goals in a timely fashion, with high success rates (I.B.3-7).

School of Continuing Education programs provide extensive support services to students enrolled in noncredit coursework (I.A.2-6). Embedded counseling, soft-skills, tutoring, assessment, and access to specialized courses are provided to English as a Second Language students attempting to acquire English and literacy skills and Adult Basic Education and short-term Vocational students needing to complete high school graduation requirements, improve basic skills, or gain vocational skills (II.A.4-11). Since 2014, the Title V grant has emulated the best of the above-mentioned practices in its five Career and Technology Education (CTE) cohorts and shown strong retention and persistence in its first three years of piloting (II.A.4-12).

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) offers pre-collegiate curriculum and distinguishes that curriculum from college-level curriculum. The College supports students in learning, advancing, and succeeding in college-level curriculum.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • At Mt. SAC, prerequisites are established and the determination between course types (including pre-collegiate and collegiate) is determined and entered into the curriculum development/review system.
  • The key to creating the distinction between pre-collegiate and collegiate courses lies in the identification of exit skills and the creation of prerequisites.
  • Program quality and improvement are embedded in Mt. SAC’s curriculum planning process.
  • Prerequisites are used to successfully transition students from pre-collegiate courses to collegiate courses in the composition sequence.
  • The School of Continuing Education offers students a variety of methods to take pre-collegiate coursework.

Standard II.A. Figure II.A.4.-2. Mathematics Course Sequences
Long Description
Figure II.A.4.-2. Math Course Sequences

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.A.2-6 Noncredit Student Success Plan
I.B.1-32 Curriculum and Instruction Council Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.1-33 Educational Design Committee Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.2-2 AP4020 Program and Curriculum Development
I.B.3-7 Pathways to Transfer Success Data
I.C.3-1 WebCMS Webpage
II.A.1-3 Chancellor’s Office Program and Course Approval Handbook pg. 143-144
II.A.2-1 Academic Senate Content Review Plan
II.A.4-1 BP4020 Corequisites, Prerequisites, and Advisories
II.A.4-2 EDC Minutes 9-16-2016: Noncredit Programs
II.A.4-3 BP4260 Prerequisites, Corequisites, and Advisories
II.A.4-4 AP4260 - Prerequisites, Corequisites, and Advisories
II.A.4-5 Guidelines for Title 5 Regulations Section 55003 - Policies for Prerequisites, Corequisites, and Advisories
II.A.4-6 Curriculum Report Academic Senate 4-24-2014
II.A.4-7 Educational Design Committee Minutes 9-3-2013
II.A.4-8 English Placement Chart
II.A.4-9 English 67 Course Outline
II.A.4-10 English 1A Course Outline
II.A.4-11 School of Continuing Education Programs
II.A.4-12 Title V Success Rates

II.A.5.

The institution’s degrees and programs follow practices common to American higher education, including appropriate length, breadth, depth, rigor, course sequencing, time to completion, and synthesis of learning. The institution ensures that minimum degree requirements are 60 semester credits or equivalent at the associate level, and 120 credits or equivalent at the baccalaureate level. (ER 12)

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

The College’s Degrees and Programs Follow Practices Common to American Higher Education

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) uses several formal processes to ensure its programs and degrees comprise the highest quality elements of student learning and employ best practices in delivery of those programs. All of these processes are a product of shared governance collaboration and are in response to state-mandated as well as locally-developed standards. There are several sources for the criteria used in development of these programs, including the Chancellor’s Office Program and Course Approval Handbook, Guidelines for Title 5 Regulations, and Curriculum Resources Made Accessible developed by the System Advisory Committee on Curriculum (II.A.1-3 pg. 20, 75-94, II.A.3-3, II.A.5-1). Locally developed resources include Mt. SAC Board Policy (BP) 4020 and Administrative Procedure (AP) 4020 Curriculum and Development, BP 4260 Prerequisites, Co-requisites and Advisories, the Educational Design Committee (EDC) Documents and Forms, the Academic Senate Content Review Implementation Plan per Resolution 2012-02, and feedback from Advisory Committees in CTE areas (II.A.4-5, I.B.2-2, II.A.4-1, II.A.4-3, II.A.5-2, II.A.5-3, II.A.2-1 pg. 18, II.A.5-4 pg. 4-5). Each of these sources informs the processes used by several shared governance committees across campus to ensure the rigor, appropriateness, and timely execution of programs and degrees.

Although one could argue that there is essentially one general process that comprises the entire mechanism of course, program, and degree development and review, these larger processes are made up of several smaller processes defined by the shared governance committees that facilitate them. Each step ensures full participation of faculty and is informed by state and local policy.

The School of Continuing Education high school program maintains high standards for curriculum and instruction, which is evidenced by UC/CSU a-g status and NCAA designation for high school core subjects. Courses submitted by School of Continuing Education for a-g status went through a rigorous review process by discipline faculty at the University of California. All courses are approved and listed on the UC articulation website. In addition, School of Continuing Education high school faculty have followed a similar process with the NCAA to ensure that courses contain rigor and standards to prepare students for college-level coursework.

Mt. SAC has 16 certificates that are available 100 percent online and 10 certificates that are 50 percent or more available online (II.A.5-2). Processes related to distance education at Mt. SAC are guided by AP 4105 and Department of Education regulations (I.B.2-24). The College’s Distance Learning Master Plan was developed by the Distance Learning Committee in part to articulate needs for distance education courses. (I.A.1-29, II.A.5-5) All new distance learning course proposals are reviewed through the regular curriculum approval process, as facilitated by the EDC (I.B.1-33), and overseen by Curriculum and Instruction (I.B.1-32). Additional quality assurance criteria for distance learning courses are described in the distance learning course amendment form. A mandatory certification for teaching online courses, Skills and Pedagogy for Online Teaching (SPOT) is offered by the Online Learning Support Center (II.A.5-6, II.A.5-7, II.A.5-8).

Program completion timelines and course sequencing patterns are required for the approval of all programs. The Chancellor’s Office began requesting program course sequencing tables in 2014 (II.A.1-3 pg. 20, 75-94). Since that time, all new degrees and certificates submitted to EDC are required to contain course sequencing tables that note the courses in a specific order across a recommended timeline. Course sequencing tables are included in the program submission via the program cover sheet (II.A.5-9, II.A.5-10, II.A.5-11, II.A.5-12, II.A.5-13). As of the publishing of the College’s new digital catalog (2016-17) on the CourseLeaf platform, course sequence tables are available to students in the catalog as well as in certificate and degree brochures, such as the Aeronautics program (II.A.5-14).

The College Ensures Minimum Degree Requirements for Its Degrees

The minimum requirements of Mt. SAC’s associates degrees, including Associate Degrees for Transfer (ADT), are 60 units and are described in the College Catalog (I.A.4-1 pg. 44, 176). A Bachelor’s Degree in Aviation Management, offered by Southern Illinois University; a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, offered by Mt. Saint Mary’s University; and a Bachelor’s Degree in Business, offered by the University of La Verne, are available to students. These degrees are offered on the Mt. SAC campus by the respective colleges named.

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College’s (Mt. SAC’s) degrees and programs follow practices common to American higher education, including appropriate length, breadth, depth, rigor, course sequencing, time to completion, and synthesis of learning. The College ensures that minimum degree requirements are 60 semester credits or equivalent at the associate level. Based on the narrative above, the College meets Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges Eligibility Requirement 12.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Mt. SAC has several formal processes to ensure that its programs and degrees comprise the highest quality elements of student learning and best practices in mode of delivery.
  • Timelines and course sequencing are required for the approval of all programs.
  • The minimum requirements of Mt. SAC’s A.A. degrees are 60 units and are described in the College catalog.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.A.1-29 Distance Learning Master Plan
I.A.4-1 Catalog 2016-17 pg. 44, 176
I.B.1-32 Curriculum and Instruction Council Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.1-33 Educational Design Committee Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.2-2 AP4020 Program and Curriculum Development
I.B.2-24 AP4105 Distance Learning
II.A.1-3 Chancellor’s Office Program and Course Approval Handbook pg. 20, 75-94
II.A.2-1 Academic Senate Content Review Form pg. 18
II.A.3-3 State Academic Senate Curriculum Guide
II.A.4-1 BP4020 Program, Curriculum and Course Development
II.A.4-3 BP4260 Prerequisites, Corequisites, and Advisories
II.A.4-5 Guidelines for Title 5 Regulations Section 55003 - Policies for Prerequisites, Corequisites, and Advisories
II.A.5-1 Title 5 55130 for Credit Programs and 55150, 55151, 55154, and 55155 for Noncredit Programs
II.A.5-2 Substantive Change Proposal
II.A.5-3 Educational Design Committee Guidelines
II.A.5-4 Advisory Committee Handbook pg. 4-5
II.A.5-5 Distance Learning Committee Purpose, Function, and Members
II.A.5-6 Skills and Pedagogy for Online Teaching
II.A.5-7 Online Learning Support Center
II.A.5-8 Distance Learning Faculty Resources
II.A.5-9 Course Sequencing
II.A.5-10 Animation Course Sequence Table
II.A.5-11 Architecture Design Course Sequence Table
II.A.5-12 Electronics Technology Course Sequence Table
II.A.5-13 Respiratory Therapy Course Sequence Table
II.A.5-14 Aeronautics Program Degree Brochure

II.A.6.

The institution schedules courses in a manner that allows students to complete certificate and degree programs within a period of time consistent with established expectations in higher education. (ER 9)

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) utilizes a dynamic enrollment management process that allows the College to be nimble in its ability to adjust department schedules to meet student demand. Mt. SAC’s real-time, data-driven enrollment management process identifies students’ needs and then aligns course offerings with those needs. Mt. SAC’s scheduling process is guided by the following goals:

  • Offer courses in the appropriate sequence to ensure students can complete their program of study in a timely manner.
  • Offer an appropriate number of courses to meet student demand.
  • Ensure that courses are offered at a variety of times during the day, evening, and weekends to accommodate student needs.
  • Offer courses in a variety of instructional modes such as: traditional, hybrid, and distance learning.

The class schedule is built semester by semester one year in advance. Mt. SAC implements a collaborative process that involves department faculty, department chairs, division deans, and the Instruction Office. Prior to building the class schedule, enrollment data from the previous year is analyzed to help determine the number of sections to offer, the appropriate times to offer courses, and the best use of classroom space (II.A.6-1, II.A.6-2, II.A.6-3, II.A.6-4).

The scheduling process begins with faculty reviewing their certificate and degree program needs and their program review results. Next, the faculty and deans review Argos reports that provide detailed course- and department-specific enrollments from the previous year. They consider the demand for their department courses by analyzing the course fill rate and student wait-lists. Based on this information, the department chair builds the department schedule to be reviewed by the dean for approval (II.A.6-5, II.A.6-6, II.A.6-7, II.A.6-8).

Once registration begins, the deans closely monitor their enrollments by courses and departments. On a weekly basis, they pull Argos reports that show the number of students enrolled by course and the number of students on wait-lists. As registration progresses and classes fill, the deans contact the department chairs to discuss adding additional sections. In addition, classes that are below the expected enrollment numbers at that point in time are also discussed with the department chairs for potential cancellation and replacement with other high demand classes. This is an ongoing process throughout the registration period (II.A.6-5, II.A.6-6, II.A.6-7, II.A.6-8).

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College’s (Mt. SAC) dynamic enrollment management process results in a schedule that promotes student success, meets students’ needs, and allows for completion of programs of study in an efficient and timely manner. Based on the narrative above, the College meets Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges Eligibility Requirement 9.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Mt. SAC’s data-driven enrollment management process identifies students’ needs then aligns course schedules with those needs.
  • The Mt. SAC scheduling process includes dynamic collaboration between faculty, department chairs, deans, and other instructional managers.
  • Mt. SAC is committed to assisting students in completing courses, degrees, and certificates in a timely fashion.

List of Evidence

Title Content
II.A.6-1 Enrollment History
II.A.6-2 Fill Rates
II.A.6-3 GE Pattern Gap Analyses
II.A.6-4 Degree and Certificate Award Data
II.A.6-5 Enrollment by Division
II.A.6-6 Fill Rate by Course
II.A.6-7 Fill Rate by Department
II.A.6-8 Waitlist by Department

II.A.7.

The institution effectively uses delivery modes, teaching methodologies and learning support services that reflect the diverse and changing needs of its students, in support of equity in success for all students.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

The College Uses Delivery Modes, Teaching Methods, and Learning Support that Reflect Diverse and Changing Needs of Students

Mt. San Antonio College’s (Mt. SAC’s) commitment to addressing diversity is built on its mission, core values, and goals. Included in Mt. SACs mission is the clear commitment to addressing the broad range of diversity on campus: “Specifically, the College is committed to providing quality education, services, and workforce training so that students become productive members of a diverse, sustainable, global society. The College pledges to prepare students for lifelong learning through the mastery of basic skills, the achievement of associate degrees and certificates, and the completion of career and transfer pathways. The College carries out this commitment by providing an engaging and supportive teaching and learning environment for students of diverse origins, experiences, needs, abilities, and goals.” Core values include “Diversity – We respect and welcome all differences, and we foster equal participation throughout the campus community.” The mission drives the College’s goals, several of which comprise elements of diversity: Goal #1: The College will prepare students for success through the development and support of exemplary programs and services; Goal #3: The College will utilize student learning outcome and placement assessment data to guide planning, curriculum design, pedagogy, and/or decision-making at the department/unit and institutional levels; Goal #5: Students entering credit programs of study will be ready for college-level academic achievement; and Goal # 9: The College will provide opportunities for increased diversity and equity for all across campus (I.A.1-2).

College mission, values, and goals inform diversity planning, which takes several forms. The mission, values, and goals are reflected in the Educational Master Plan:

  • Strategic Objective 2A: Improve student successful course completion rates both by improving methods of tutoring and service delivery and by increasing student access to tutoring and lab support services through providing well-trained tutoring centers and instructional lab support staff for all disciplines.
  • Strategic Objective 8A: Provide faculty and staff professional development opportunities for implementation of best practices in teaching and learning, especially for work with basic skills and online students, use of library resources, use of Moodlerooms/Canvas and other learning technologies, and data-driven outcomes assessment.
  • Strategic Objective 10A: Promote and support basic skills tutoring services on campus. Progress towards Strategic Objective 2A includes increased success rates in basic skills courses (+14 percent) when students attend at least 90 minutes of tutoring. Usage of labs serving credit students doubled over a three-year period, and staffing levels have increased (A.3-2).

Through reflection, review of data, research, and focus group results, the College constantly reviews its programs and services to ensure that the diverse and changing needs of its student population are addressed. Planning efforts such as the Student Equity and the Student Services/Instructional Educational Master Plan meetings serve to bring together faculty, staff, and managers to assess and plan modes and methods to implement instructional strategies and support interventions to serve students.

Mt. SAC has a comprehensive commitment and intentionality to address learning styles and multiple assessments of student learning. A prime way in which the College uses teaching methodologies and learning support services to reflect the diversity of students is through robust professional development offerings targeting improvement in teaching and learning support. Faculty fall and spring FLEX (professional development) days have included increased sessions focused on practices to promote equity in success for all students. Example session topics include: culturally responsive practices in the classroom; language, power, and privilege; best practices for supporting student veterans; improving the campus climate for LGBTQ students; supporting the older student and recently incarcerated student; digital stories of Asian and Pacific Islander students; and cultural capital and equity mindedness in the classroom.

An institutional commitment to pedagogical development and student learning is evidenced by Professional and Organizational Development (POD) training/workshops for full-time and adjunct faculty (II.A.2-15). Through POD, Mt. SAC provides a hybrid online course for faculty on Accommodating Students with Disabilities in the Classroom. By far, the most popular part of this class is the section on universal design. The course offers a framework by which Mt. SAC professors can apply universal design teaching and learning strategies in order to enhance curriculum to be applicable to most students, minimizing the need for special adaptations or accommodations. The overarching strategy is to consider the “universe” of student characteristics that present in any given classroom from day one and ensure multiple forms of presentation of course material, assessment of learning, and student engagement to address the wide student diversity and promote student equity and success (II.A.7-1).

Mt. SAC’s Dean of Disabled Student Programs and Services has been the College advocate for universal design since 2003. Various on-campus presentations by this dean have been offered during faculty FLEX days, student services professional development days, Disability Awareness Month (October), the annual Developmental Education Conference (Parachutes and Ladders), new faculty seminar, Online Learning Week, and as part of the Accommodating Students with Disabilities class. In spring 2016, a faculty inquiry group (FIG) formed to study universal design. The major questions asked by the FIG were: Why is universal design important in the classroom? Can the different models, principles, and theories be synthesized into a universal design for a learning framework for Mt. SAC? How can universal design promote student success? How does an instructor implement universal design in the classroom? How does universal design change a professor’s perception of his/her efficacy in delivering course content? How can universal design strategies address student inequities? Does universal design address the different academic preparation levels we see in the classroom? The FIG conducted a study on universal design and professors’ attitude, awareness, and desire to change course material to incorporate more universal design strategies. Another goal of the FIG was to provide means by which faculty could access more information on universal design. A FIG member and Mt. SAC librarian developed a library guide (lib guide) that includes an annotated bibliography on universal design, Universal Design of Learning Principles, and course changes faculty can implement. The lib guide also includes additional information on the study and implementation of universal design on campus and many of the most recent PowerPoint presentations on universal design (II.A.7-2). Future plans include the continued development of the library guide, a universal design symposium in January 2017, an online course for faculty on universal design course strategies, and continued efforts to provide additional professional development presentations for the College. In support of universal design, the College assures that all videos are closed-captioned and all classrooms can project those closed-captioned videos. Students with disabilities receive in-class accommodations as indicated, such as note takers, sign language interpreters, and approval from faculty to record lectures. Accommodated testing services and document enlargement for visually impaired students are provided in Disabled Student Services and Programs. In addition, the College adopted a hiring mechanism to provide sufficient interpreters for deaf or hard-of-hearing students.

In addition to POD on-campus training, the College supports conference and travel funding for full-time and adjunct faculty up to $1,500 per person until funds are exhausted and also hosts an annual Developmental Education Conference (II.A.2-14). This conference series is just completing its 14th year and is a major activity focused on developmental pedagogy and learning styles (II.A.2-15).

To directly address needs identified in the College’s Student Equity Plan for all of Mt. SAC's student populations who experience an achievement gap, a Professional Learning Academy is in development to ensure that equity efforts extend to all classrooms. This is achieved through a series of course offerings organized into certificate programs for faculty, including an instructional innovation certificate and multi-level student equity certificates. Unlike traditional professional development workshops, academy certificates require faculty to complete work beyond the trainings and then complete an assessment cycle to ascertain the impact of their pedagogical innovations and adaptations. This model is being practiced in the College’s new faculty seminar for 2016-17 in which 55 new faculty are engaging in a year-long equity training institute that will culminate in completion of an equity certificate. Data collected from individual assessments will be summarized by a faculty team and reported annually through the campus Student Equity Plan, starting in July 2017.

To address needs identified in the campus Student Equity plan for LGBTQ students, a minimum of 30 faculty per year are now completing Safe Space Training. This training promotes strategies for inclusiveness and support for this population via syllabi, class assignments, classroom language, course materials, and the physical design of the classroom itself. Participants are required to report back about specific adaptations they have implemented before receiving their Safe Space certification, and the campus-wide effectiveness of the overall program will be assessed on an annual basis starting in July 2017. 

The College Supports Equity in Success for All Students

The Student Equity Plan’s goals focus on specific, targeted interventions for populations of students enrolled in particular College programs, novel, unique new initiatives designed to provide under-represented and under-served students with interventions to improve their success rate, cross-collaboration between various departments and programs through shared resources and integrated activities, and college-wide initiatives designed to improve student equity and student success through larger scale efforts (I.A.1-12, I.B.1-52). The commitment is consistent with the College Strategic Plan 2015-17, which commits the College to providing opportunities for increased diversity and equity across campus, specifically in Strategic Objective 9.1: “Mitigate disproportionate impact based on gender, race/ethnicity, disability, age, emancipated foster youth status, or economic status for student access, retention, degree and certificate completion, English as a Second Language and basic skills completion, and transfer.” (I.A.3-1 pg. 13).

The College’s Student Equity Plan synthesizes the College’s approach to diversity and equity by utilizing critical research to inform development and implementation of specific instructional and support interventions to address disproportionality in achievement of identified student groups. For example, research shows that the student groups who excel at a disproportionally lower rate are Latino, African-American, and Pacific Islander males. The College has developed a Minority Male Initiative, based on the M2C3 Initiative, to address these disparities in student success. This initiative has resulted in the development of an in-reach effort to connect with students of color through student ambassadors. Coordination of student equity efforts between Instruction and Student Services has resulted in several strategies to increase success rates in math and science. The Math Boot Camp, STEM Center, and Summer Transfer Bridge are collaborative efforts that target students underrepresented in these academic areas.

The College’s development and successful implementation of learning communities and cohort learning groups has enabled many targeted student populations to excel in basic skills classes. High school students testing into basic skills courses are recruited into the Bridge Program, which offers a highly successful Summer Bridge Program as well as English and Math Bridge during the academic year. Pathways to Transfer are linked courses that guarantee students can complete their basic skills course sequence by enrolling in subsequent levels of classes. Counseling services and community classes are linked with learning communities and learning groups. These collaborative teaching and learning support efforts have resulted in successful, first-time pass rates in basic skills classes for many low-income and first-generation college students (I.B.5-23).

Other student success initiatives focused on equity include:

  • The Reaching Empowering Achieving Completing with Heart (REACH) program to serve foster youth and former foster youth students.
  • LGBTQ student outreach through the College’s Pride Center, a restructuring of, and increase in, faculty ally training sessions, and targeted counseling and mental health services offered to LGBTQ students.
  • Equity-focused tutor training sessions offered through the Learning Assistance Center to improve the tutorial relationship between tutors and students.
  • The Title V grant supporting the Appreciating Diversity workshops and certificate for student leadership through the Student Life program.

Beyond tutoring and academic support services for students, myriad efforts have promoted resources for distance learning (DL) students. An example is a re-designed Distance Learning Student Support Services webpage for students intended as a one-stop click (II.A.7-3). This webpage URL is embedded in every schedule note attached to each DL class in the schedule of classes. Additionally, students enrolling in a DL class are directed to free short instructional videos on being prepared to take and succeed in DL classes through the same schedule note. Administrative Procedure 4105 Distance Learning also includes guidelines and recommended practices to ensure the accessibility of DL courses for students with disabilities to promote success in DL courses for all students.

Students enrolled in the School of Continuing Education have unique learning needs and are among the disproportionately impacted campus populations. As such, there are a variety of delivery methodologies and interventions available to support their goal attainment. Currently, there are active projects within the Campus Student Equity Plan for ESL, Short-term Vocational, WIN Program, and Adult Basic Education that provide these specific interventions and resources to marginalized noncredit populations. Furthermore, although some noncredit courses are offered through the traditional direct-instruction model, other delivery modes are provided. These include open-entry/exit lab classes students can attend at variable times available in their schedules and others that deliver hands-on instruction, computer-aided instruction, and contextualized learning. Noncredit and community and fee-based courses are also provided during evening and weekend hours, within the community, and in a compressed schedule to adequately meet the needs of students, many of whom have a multitude of barriers to entry and retention.

Adults with disabilities (AWD) also have the opportunity for specialized interventions and resources through noncredit course offerings. The AWD program is currently developing the IMPACT program to help students maximize their potential for integration into mainstream of society. The specialized curriculum contains the following tenets: independent living skills; mobility training; physical health and well-being; advocacy for self; college, career, and job readiness skills; and technology training. It is anticipated that this program will be ready for implementation in 2017-18.

Mt. SAC recognizes that the one of the best strategies to reflect the diverse and changing needs of students and support success for all students is to recruit and hire a diverse workforce. Mt. SAC’s diversity commitment is evident in its Equal Employment Opportunity Plan which states, “To properly serve a growing, diverse population, the District will endeavor to hire and retain faculty and staff who are sensitive to, and knowledgeable of, the value of diversity and equity in the workplace and in the District’s academic and vocational programs.” This plan also ensures that every stage of the campus hiring process includes an evaluation of sensitivity to and understanding of the diverse students served at Mt. SAC (II.A.7-4 pg. 1, 14). This commitment is also expressed in the College’s Strategic Plan, particularly in Outcomes Objectives 9.2.1, “The College will have a workforce whose diversity supports its mission,” and 9.2.2 “The College will implement a revised EEO Plan that will be reviewed every two years,” and Strategic Objective 9.3 “Implement college employment practices that are consistent with the EEO Plan, reflect sensitivity and understanding of student and employee diversity, and eliminate bias and unlawful discrimination in the employment process.” The Campus Equity and Diversity Committee’s (CEDC) Purpose and Function Statement includes EEO plan review and recommendations for revision biennially (II.A.7-5).

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) effectively uses delivery modes, teaching methodologies and learning support services that reflect the diverse and changing needs of its students and supports equity in success for all students.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Mt. SAC’s commitment to addressing diversity is built on its mission, core values, and goals.
  • The College mission, values, and goals inform diversity planning that takes several forms.
  • The Student Equity Plan’s goals focus on specific, targeted interventions.
  • The College’s diversity planning informs application of its diversity commitment.
  • Mt. SAC faculty show a commitment to pedagogical development and student learning.
  • Mt. SAC regularly assesses its commitment to diversity.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.A.1-2 Mission, Vision, Core Values
I.A.1-12 Student Equity Plan 2015-16
I.A.3-1 Strategic Plan 2015-17 pg. 13
I.A.3-2 The Development of the Educational Master Plan 2013
I.B.1-52 Student Equity Committee Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.5-23 Bridge Program Report
II.A.2-14 Professional & Organizational Development Funding Process
II.A.2-15 Developmental Education Parachutes and Ladders Flier 2016
II.A.7-1 Accommodating Students with Disabilities in the Classroom
II.A.7-2 Universal Design
II.A.7-3 Distance Learning Student Support Services
II.A.7-4 Equal Employment Opportunity pg. 1, 14
II.A.7-5 Campus Equity and Diversity Committee Purpose, Function, and Members

II.A.8.

The institution validates the effectiveness of department wide course and/or program examinations, where used, including direct assessment of prior learning. The institution ensures that processes are in place to reduce test bias and enhance reliability.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

The College Validates Department wide Course and/or Program Examinations

Department wide course exams exist in the following Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) degree and certificate programs: Air Conditioning and Refrigeration, Aircraft Maintenance Technology, Certified Nursing Assistant, EMT/Paramedic, Histotechnology, Interior Design, Nursing, Paralegal, Phlebotomy, Psychiatric Technician, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Therapy, Veterinary Technology, Water Technology, and Welding (II.A.8-1).

Initially, the validity of these exams is established through the development and assessment of course level student learning outcomes (SLOs) and related program level outcomes (PLOs). For those programs that are accredited by outside accrediting agencies or certified by outside agencies, these outcomes are based on accreditation or certification standards (II.A.8-2, II.A.8-3, II.A.8-4). Faculty use accrediting standards and licensure requirements to form the basis of their course and program outcomes, which are then vetted through College curriculum and outcomes development and assessment processes.

Another source of information faculty use to determine course exam validity and reliability is the result of student pass rates on licensing exams (II.A.8-5). Many of these programs, such as the Registered Veterinary Technician program, have at least one PLO that is determined and influenced by the pass rate of its licensing/national/state exams. In conjunction with outcomes assessment based on accreditation standards, faculty use these pass rates as ad hoc PLOs to measure the effectiveness of their curricula (II.A.8-6).

Outcomes assessment and licensure pass-rate data is also regularly presented to program advisory committees to keep committee members updated. Based on the data, committees may make recommendations for curriculum revision (II.A.8-7).

School of Continuing Education noncredit programs such as Adult Basic Education (ABE) and ESL ensure the integrity of course and program examination standards, including reducing exam bias and increasing reliability. The ESL Computer Adaptive Placement (CAP) test is administered at time of entry into the program to assess proficiency level, and has been validated according to Chancellor's Office guidelines. ESL faculty review midterm exams for content validity during department scheduled in-services. ESL final exams are standardized for the department; all level exams, with item analyses, are made available to faculty to review and comment on content validity during a specified time period (II.A.8-8 pg. 2, II.A.8-9). Noncredit high school courses all require a final exam. Faculty members review results against the criteria of 70 percent pass rate. When this is not met, faculty analyze the data and determine improvements to the exam (II.A.8-10). In ABE, final exams are written and reviewed by a diverse group of subject matter experts within the department. Faculty meet and discuss the importance of study guides and guided practice tests before the final exam to ensure that appropriate course content is covered on exams (II.A.8-11).

Department has Process in Place for Direct Assessment of Prior Learning

Mt. SAC follows Administrative Procedure 4235 Credit by Examination in its direct assessment of prior learning of students. The College publishes in its catalog a listing of externally administered examinations that are acceptable for credit. Additionally, each division office maintains a listing of courses that are eligible for credit by internally administered examination. Petitions for credit by examination are available at each division office.

The Adult High School Diploma Program in ABE also assesses prior learning through a credit-by-exam option. In addition to determining current competency level, diploma completion is accelerated by allowing students transferring from unaccredited and international schools to receive course credit and/or competency for passing a subject matter test. Credit-by-exam is currently offered in Algebra 1, Life Science, United States History, and World History. In addition to the credit-by-exam option, students transferring from accredited schools may also be evaluated through a transcript evaluation process (II.A.8-10).

The School of Continuing Education noncredit programs utilize diagnostic assessment tools in order to evaluate students’ previous learning experiences. This enables faculty to place students in the appropriate levels and subjects that lead to goal attainment. Students take the CASAS test in ABE and ESL; and the Tests of Adult Basic Education (TABE) in ABE and Short-term Vocational programs to determine English, basic math, and reading skills. Incoming High School Equivalency (HSE) Exam Preparation students take practice GED reading tests to ascertain current reading levels and potential test readiness (II.A.8-12 pg. 2).

Department has Processes in Place to Reduce Course Exam Bias and Enhance Reliability

Multiple Career Technical Education programs use department wide exams to promote attainment of consistent learning outcomes among all students. Department faculty conduct item and statistical analyses of exam results in addition to assessment of course SLOs (Emergency Medical Technician/Paramedic, Mental Health, Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Therapy, Welding). Licensure exam pass rates also inform analysis of department-wide exams.

For example, the Histotech program, where course exams are based on outside accrediting standards (American Society of Consultant Pharmacists and National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences), has faculty review item analysis data to identify potential bias. The Registered Veterinary Technician program developed exam rubrics to ensure consistent exam grading. The FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) also provides pass rates and an item analysis of written exam results to the Aircraft Maintenance Department (II.A.8-13).

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) validates the effectiveness of department-wide course and/or program examinations, where used, including direct assessment of prior learning. The College ensures that processes are in place to reduce test bias and enhance reliability.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • The validity of department-wide course exams is established through the development and assessment of course level SLOs and related PLOs.
  • Faculty use licensing exam results as a source of information to determine exam validity and reliability.
  • School of Continuing Education noncredit programs such as ABE and ESL ensure the integrity of course and program examination standards
  • In order to appropriately assess current student learning levels, noncredit programs evaluate students for previous learning.
  • The Adult High School Diploma Program in ABE assesses prior learning through a credit-by-exam option.

List of Evidence

Title Content
II.A.8-1 Department-wide Course Exams in Degree and Certificate Programs
II.A.8-2 AIRC: Course SLOs Based Upon Exam
II.A.8-3 Nursing: Administers the Predictor Exit Exam
II.A.8-4 Welding: L.A. City Department of Building and Safety Written Exam
II.A.8-5 Licensure Exam Pass Rate Webpage
II.A.8-6 Vet Tech PLO SLO Email
II.A.8-7 Vet Tech Advisory Committee Minutes 3-26-2015
II.A.8-8 ASE example pg. 2
II.A.8-9 ESL Review Program-Level SLOs
II.A.8-10 ABE Adult High School Diploma Credit by Exam Option
II.A.8-11 Rubric Example
II.A.8-12 SCE Student Handbook pg. 2
II.A.8-13 Aircraft Maintenance Example

II.A.9.

The institution awards course credit, degrees and certificates based on student attainment of learning outcomes. Units of credit awarded are consistent with institutional policies that reflect generally accepted norms or equivalencies in higher education. If the institution offers courses based on clock hours, it follows federal standards for clock-to-credit-hour conversions. (ER 10)

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

The Attainment of Outcomes (Objectives) is the Basis for Awarding Degrees and Certificates

Degrees and certificates are awarded at Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) based on students’ ability to successfully complete individual courses within a program. A clear example is the Associate Degree for Transfer (ADT) in math, which articulates the math requirements for the degree (II.A.9-1). The Course Outline of Record for one course in that degree, Math 180, provides the measurable objectives (MOs) for the course and also provides a link to student learning outcomes (SLOs) (I.C.3-1). MOs and SLOs are mapped to program level outcomes (PLOs) and institutional level outcomes (ILOs). Through assessment of course-level MOs and SLOs, faculty evaluate the learning occurring at the program and institutional levels (II.A.3-6, II.A.3-9). With assessment and mapping, faculty may make improvements to curriculum at both the course and program level.

When new courses, degrees, and certificates are submitted for review and approval to the Educational Design Committee (EDC), outcomes are created at the course and program level. SLOs must be assessed a minimum of every four years for courses. SLOs are aligned with PLOs and, ultimately, with the College’s ILOs (previously referred to as GEOs) (I.A.1-30, II.A.3-6).

Institutional dialogue about the awarding of course credit, degrees, and certificates based on the attainment of SLOs occurs at several levels on campus. On the planning side, it begins with the Outcomes Committee, which establishes norms and criteria for outcomes creation and assessment, and ends with the Planning for Institutional Effectiveness (PIE) process where each instructional unit discusses the impact of outcomes on student learning and program success (II.A.3-25 pg. 52-57). It also occurs consistently within divisions and departments, usually as a standing agenda item in those monthly meetings (II.A.9-2). This dialogue also occurs with frequency during the curriculum, degree, and certificate development and review process, and includes:

  • Faculty at the department level, both when courses/programs are developed and when the SLOs/PLOs for the courses/programs are assessed
  • Division management
  • Faculty curriculum liaisons assigned by the Academic Senate
  • EDC who reviews and approves curriculum/program detail including measureable learning objectives and student learning outcomes (IB.1-33)
  • Curriculum and Instruction Council (C&I) who ensures appropriateness of the curriculum/program to the mission, goals, and the overall program priorities of the College (IB.1-32)

Units of Credit are Consistent with College Policies and Higher Education Norms

EDC ensures that units awarded for degrees and certificates are consistent with the Chancellor’s Office Policy Change for Hours and Units Calculations for Credit Courses Memo and Instructions, October 2015, that reflects generally accepted norms or equivalencies in higher education (II.A.9-3, II.A.9-4, I.B.2-2, II.A.9-5, II.A.9-6). EDC ensures that units and hours are accurately listed on Course Outline of Record and program outlines, based on state guidelines informed by Title 5 and the Education Code as reflected in the Chancellor’s Office Program and Course Approval Handbook (II.A.9-7, II.A.1-3 pg. 78-83).

Administrative Procedure (AP) 4105 describes the context for distance learning (DL) on campus (I.B.2-24). DL courses move through the same approval process as traditional curricula, including being held to the same rigor and reviewed regularly. The elements of the traditional curriculum review process that also apply to DL courses are detailed in the DL faculty resources page (II.A.9-8). Mt. SAC has 16 certificates that are available 100 percent online and 10 certificates that are 50 percent or more online but not fully available online (II.A.5-3 pg. 4). Mt. SAC does not offer 100 percent online degrees, although students can take 50 percent or more of their general education requirements online or in a hybrid course.

AP 4024 defines a unit of credit as 18 lecture contact hours plus a minimum of 36 additional hours of related independent student work for a total of 54 hours or 54 laboratory or activity contact hours. The exceptions are work experience and internship courses, which award 1 unit of credit in compliance with Title 5 specifications under section 55256.5, 1 unit for each 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of unpaid work. As course contact hours increase, additional credit is awarded in half-unit increments per the above standards. In addition, courses are not offered for zero (0) units. The College catalog further simplifies the AP definition (I.A.4-1): The standard unit represents one hour in-class recitation and two hours of outside preparation per week or its equivalent for one semester. By this definition, unit is synonymous with semester lecture hour.

Mt. SAC has one program that uses clock hours. Students enrolled in the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) approved Aircraft Maintenance Program must meet mandated hours using a time clock. Federal Standards for clock-to-credit hour conversions are used in the awarding of credit for courses in this program.

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) awards course credit, degrees and certificates based on student attainment of learning outcomes. Units of credit awarded are consistent with Chancellor’s Office, Title 5, and institutional policies that reflect generally accepted norms or equivalencies in higher education. The College offers courses based on clock hours and follows federal standards for clock-to-credit-hour conversions. Based on the narrative above, the College meets Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges Eligibility Requirement 10.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Degrees and certificates are awarded at Mt. SAC based on students’ successful completion of learning outcomes.
  • Institutional dialogue about the learning expected of students to earn a degree or certificate occurs at several levels on campus.
  • Mt. SAC has 16 certificates available 100 percent online and students can earn over 50 percent of their general education requirements online.
  • Administrative Procedure (AP) 4024 defines a unit of credit.
  • Federal Standards for clock-to-credit hour conversions are used in the awarding of credit for courses in the Aircraft Maintenance Program.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.A.1-30 Outcomes Plan 2012-2020
I.A.4-1 Catalog 2016-17
I.B.1-32 Curriculum and Instruction Council Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.1-33 Educational Design Committee Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.2-2 AP4020 Program and Curriculum Development
I.B.2-24 AP4105 Distance Learning
I.C.3-1 WebCMS Webpage
II.A.1-3 Chancellor’s Office Program and Course Approval Handbook pg. 78-83
II.A.3-6 Institutional Level Outcomes Map
II.A.3-9 Institutional Level Outcomes Explained
II.A.3-25 Vice President of Instruction PIE 2014-15 pg. 52-57
II.A.5-3 Substantive Change Proposal pg. 4
II.A.9-1 Course Outline of Record Associate in Science in Mathematics for Transfer
II.A.9-2 Office of Instruction Division Department Minutes
II.A.9-3 CCCC Curriculum Webpage
II.A.9-4 CCCC Memo - Utilizing the Curriculum Inventory
II.A.9-5 AP4024 Units-to-Contact-Hour Relationship
II.A.9-6 BP4100 Graduation Requirements for Degrees and Certificates
II.A.9-7 Program Sequence Examples
II.A.9-8 DL Faculty Resources Page

II.A.10.

The institution makes available to its students clearly stated transfer-of-credit policies in order to facilitate the mobility of students without penalty. In accepting transfer credits to fulfill degree requirements, the institution certifies that the expected learning outcomes for transferred courses are comparable to the learning outcomes of its own courses. Where patterns of student enrollment between institutions are identified, the institution develops articulation agreements as appropriate to its mission.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Transfer-Of-Credit Policies are Available and Clear

Mt. San Antonio College’s (Mt. SAC’s) mission drives the policies that lead to the creation of processes that increase student access to Mt. SAC programs as well as increase student transfer. Specifically, Mt. SAC’s mission includes this statement: The College pledges to prepare students for lifelong learning through the mastery of basic skills, the achievement of associate degrees and certificates, and the completion of career and transfer pathways (I.A.1-2).

In response to this specific aspect of our mission, as well as Title 5, Mt. SAC has created several relevant policies for transfer-of-credit for both incoming and outgoing students:

  • Board Policy (BP) and Administrative Procedure (AP) 4050 Articulation (IA.10-1, II.A.1-2)
  • AP 4051 Course Equivalencies and Variances (IA.10-2)
  • AP & BP 4235 Credit by Examination (IA.10-3, II.A.10-4)
  • AP & BP 4270 Use of General Education Courses Completed at Other Institutions (IA.10-5, II.A.10-6)
  • AP 4275 Guidelines for Certifying Baccalaureate Level Courses (IA.10-7)
  • AP 4280 Use of BA/BS or Higher Degree to Waive Associates Requirement (IA.10-8)
  • AP 4285 Credit for Extra-Institutional Learning (IA.10-9)

Based on these policies, Mt. SAC has created several processes that are initially communicated to students through the College catalog:

  • Evaluation of other College Coursework, Acceptance of Domestic Coursework from Accredited Colleges and Universities in the United States, and Acceptance of International Coursework from Accredited Colleges and Universities outside the United States (IA.4-1 pg. 14)
  • Articulation with High Schools, ROPs, and Adult Schools (IA.4-1 pg. 14)
  • Credit by Examination (IA.4-1 pg. 26-29)
  • International Baccalaureate Credit for Mt. SAC General Education and Credit for Extra Institutional Learning(IA.4-1 pg. 30)
  • Credit for Current License Holders and Credit for Military Training (IA.4-1 pg. 25)

In the initial application process, students begin with one click on the Apply Now link on the College home page. Students are then directed to steps that are tailored to their current student status and asked to indicate which kind of student they are (e.g., new, returning, transfer, international) (II.A.10-10). If they make any choice that indicates they have previous course work, they are directed immediately to send official transcripts to the Admissions and Records Office (II.A.10-11).

Articulation Agreements

Mt. SAC’s articulation agreement process is consistent with the College mission. This process is based on the College mission and translated into College policies, specifically BP/AP 4050 (II.A.1-2, II.A.10-1). For Mt. SAC courses articulating to California State University (CSU) and University of California (UC), the process itself is relatively simple. Once curriculum is developed by faculty and reviewed and approved by the Educational Design Committee (EDC) and the Curriculum and Instruction Committee (C&I), the College’s Articulation Officer forwards the courses to the CSUs and UCs to establish articulation (I.B.1-33, I.B.1-32). Updates on the articulation processes, including final confirmation of articulation agreements, are then forwarded to EDC and C&I, who authorize the publication of these agreements in the College catalog and communicate the disposition of the agreements to the Academic Senate, as per AP 4050 (II.A.1-2).

Associate in Arts for Transfer Degree (A.A.-T):

  • Art History
  • Communication Studies
  • English
  • Geography
  • History
  • Journalism
  • Music
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Studio Arts
  • Theater Arts

Associate in Science for Transfer Degree (A.S.-T):

  • Administration of Justice
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Mathematics

The College is currently working on the following ADTs:

  • Business Administration (A.S.-T)
  • Sociology (A.A.-T)
  • Philosophy (A.A.-T)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics (A.S.-T)
  • Kinesiology (A.A.-T)
  • Film-Television-Electronic Media (A.A.-T)

Accepting Transfer Credits

Transfer credits are accepted through a review of courses, specifically a review of course learning outcomes. When courses are accepted by Mt. SAC from other schools, either inside or outside of the state, transcript evaluators can research data located on Assist.org, a program containing shared articulation agreements between the CSUs, UCs, and California Community Colleges (II.A.10-12, II.A.10-13). In addition, the College has a separate articulation agreement with the University of Southern California (II.A.10-14). Mt. SAC, through the articulation officer, a full-time, tenured counselor, contributes to this repository, per AP 4050. Transcript evaluators can also research a faculty-populated database of equivalent courses that resides on the College’s Enterprise Application System, Banner, and is accessible by Mt. SAC evaluators, counselors, and advisors (II.A.1-2, II.A.10-15). The core of this database was built by faculty review of courses from the top 20 transfer institutions and is continually expanded as new courses from these institutions, as well as courses from other institutions, are submitted by students. If the evaluators cannot find these outside courses in Assist.org or in the College database, they will send a request for review to the appropriate department chair. The chair reviews the course and makes a recommendation that is then forwarded to the appropriate division dean for signature. If this request for department review is for an “outside” course that the submitting student is using to complete degree and certificate requirements, then the evaluators submit their requests for department review on a Request for Variance or Credit for Equivalent Course (II.A.10-16).

Mt. SAC does not have any 100 percent distance education degree programs.

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) makes available to its students clearly stated transfer-of-credit policies. In accepting transfer credits to fulfill degree requirements, the College process allows certification that the expected learning outcomes for transferred courses are comparable to the learning outcomes of its own courses. Where patterns of student enrollment between institutions are identified, the College develops articulation agreements as appropriate to its mission.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Mt. SAC has created several processes relating to transfer-of-credit that are communicated to students.
  • Mt. SAC’s articulation agreement process is consistent with the College mission.
  • Transfer credits are accepted through review of course learning outcomes.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.A.1-2 Mission, Vision, Core Values
I.A.4-1 Catalog 2016-17 pg. 14
I.A.4-1 Catalog 2016-17 pg. 26-29
I.A.4-1 Catalog 2016-17 pg. 30
I.A.4-1 Catalog 2016-17 pg. 25
I.B.1-32 Curriculum and Instruction Council Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.1-33 Educational Design Committee Purpose, Function, and Members
II.A.1-2 AP4050 Articulation
II.A.10-1 BP4050 Articulation
II.A.10-2 AP4051 Course Equivalencies and Variances
II.A.10-3 BP4235 Credit by Examination
II.A.10-4 AP4235 Credit by Examination
II.A.10-5 BP4270 Use of General Ed Courses Completed at Other Institutions
II.A.10-6 AP4270 Use of General Ed Courses Completed at Other Institutions
II.A.10-7 AP4275 Guidelines for Certifying Baccalaureate Level Courses
II.A.10-8 AP4280 Use of B.A./B.S. or Higher Degree to Waive Associates Requirement
II.A.10-9 AP4285 Credit for Extra-Institutional Learning
II.A.10-10 Steps to Apply
II.A.10-11 Steps to Apply Transfer Student
II.A.10-12 CSU Articulation Agreement
II.A.10-13 UC Articulation Agreement
II.A.10-14 USC Articulation Agreement
II.A.10-15 SHATATC
II.A.10-16 Request for Variance or Credit for Equivalent Course

II.A.11.

The institution includes in all of its programs, student learning outcomes appropriate to the program level, in communication competency, information competency, quantitative competency, analytic inquiry skills, ethical reasoning, the ability to engage diverse perspectives, and other program-specific learning outcomes.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) uses several criteria in the development of programs to determine the breadth, depth, rigor, sequencing, time to completion, synthesis of learning, and the appropriate learning outcomes for each. There are several sources for the criteria used in the development of these programs. They include statewide sources, including the Chancellor’s Office Program and Course Approval Handbook, the State Academic Senate paper “Ensuring Effective Curriculum Approval Processes: A Guide for Local Senates.” Title 5 local resources derived from statewide sources are also used, including Mt. SAC Board Policy (BP) 4260 and Administrative Procedure (AP) 4020 Curriculum and Development, and Educational Design Committee curriculum submission dates, the Academic Senate Content Review Implementation Plan, and feedback from advisory committees in Career Technical Education areas (II.A.1-3 pg. 72-93, II.A.3-3, II.A.4-5, II.A.4-3, I.B.2-2, II.A.11-1, II.A.2-1, II.A.5-4 pg. 4-5). Each of these sources informs the processes used by shared governance committees across the College to ensure the rigor, appropriateness, and timely execution of programs and degrees (see II.A.5 for details of that process).

The College Includes Learning Outcomes in All of its Programs

Learning outcomes are assessed to determine how well students are achieving the intended results of a course or program. There are two types of learning outcomes created for courses that result in student success data. Measurable objectives (MOs) are the outcomes that form the core of any course and stand as the criteria for success in the course. Student learning outcomes (SLOs) may be derived from measurable objectives in order to achieve more specific assessment and analysis. Based on this College-wide work and approved by Academic Senate, faculty may use curricular MOs and/or SLOs, to allow for the creation of broad-based SLOs that cross disciplines for use in multiple courses (II.A.2-2). Learning outcomes, are mapped to the broader program level outcomes (PLOs) and institutional level outcomes (ILOs) so that when course-level SLOs are assessed, the corresponding PLOs and ILOs are also assessed (II.A.3-6).

Learning Outcomes Include Specific Competencies and Ability Areas to Allow Diverse Perspectives

Mt. SAC has established clear ILOs to assess communication competency, information competency, quantitative competency, analytic inquiry skills, ethical reasoning, and the ability to engage diverse perspectives (II.A.11-2). Mt. SAC’s promotion of these competencies is derived directly from its mission: specifically, “the College is committed to providing quality education, services, and workforce training so that students become productive members of a diverse, sustainable, global society. The College pledges to prepare students for lifelong learning through the mastery of basic skills, the achievement of associate degrees and certificates, and the completion of career and transfer pathways. The College will carry out this commitment by providing an engaging and supportive teaching and learning environment for students of diverse origins, experiences, needs, abilities, and goals.”


Based on these aspects of its mission, Mt. SAC developed several competencies ILOs that are measured at both the course and program level as appropriate:

1)   ILO #1: Communication

Students effectively communicate with and respond to varied audiences in written, spoken or signed, and artistic forms.

Communication crosses all disciplines and may include a variety of activities, such as:

  • Comprehending, analyzing, and responding appropriately to oral, written, and visual information;
  • Reading and understanding the content and purpose of written material.
  • Speaking or signing to increase knowledge, foster understanding, or promote change; and
  • Developing and expressing ideas in writing with clarity and fluency.

2) ILO #2: Critical Thinking

Students apply creative, computational, and analytical skills to identify and solve problems, analyze information, synthesize and evaluate ideas, and transform existing ideas into new forms.

Critical thinking crosses all disciplines and may include a variety of activities, such as:

  • Analyzing content, meaning, and purpose from a variety of texts or materials.
  • Developing informed conclusions based upon the collection, examination, and synthesis of evidence.
  • Computing and analyzing multiple representations of quantitative information and/or data, including graphical, formulaic, numerical, verbal, and visual.
  • Designing, implementing, and evaluating strategies to answer questions or achieve goals.

3) ILO #3: Information Technology and Literacy

Students will use resources and technologies to locate, evaluate, synthesize, and communicate information in various formats.

Information and Technology literacy crosses all disciplines and may include a variety of activities, such as:

  • Locating, evaluating and choosing credible textual and other sources for information.
  • Interpreting the social, legal, and ethical uses of information.
  • Researching data and drawing conclusions based on an analysis of that data.
  • Using technologies to communicate, solve problems, and complete tasks.

4) ILO #4: Personal, Social, Civic, and Environmental Responsibility

Students demonstrate awareness and respect for personal, social, civic, and environmental responsibilities.

Personal, social, civic, and environmental responsibility crosses all disciplines and may include a variety of activities, such as:

  • Setting, evaluating, and monitoring academic, career, financial, and personal goals.
  • Interpreting and managing physical and mental health needs.
  • Developing self-awareness in the areas of personal development, learning styles, and decision-making strategies.
  • Recognizing and respecting the beliefs, opinions, and values of other individuals and cultures.
  • Being informed about and participating in local, state, national, and global communities.
  • Evaluating environmental conservation and sustainability.

All SLOs are mapped to PLOs that are also mapped to ILOs (II.A.3-6, II.A.11-2). As of August 2016, the College is at 100 percent mapping for degrees.

The most recent (2015) Annual Graduate Survey measured students’ reports of lessons learned related to learning outcomes. The highest results of students’ learning (out of 5) were:

  • Researching and accessing information for papers and projects (4.28)
  • Critical thinking skills (4.26)
  • Writing essays and/or completing research papers (4.22)
  • Understanding other ethnicities and cultures (4.19)
  • Asking questions in class (4.02)

Students’ perceptions of their abilities were also very positive (out of 5):

  • Ability to accomplish future goals (4.52)
  • Improved self-confidence (4.33)
  • Overall academic ability (4.30)

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) includes in all of its programs student learning outcomes appropriate to the program level, in communication competency, information competency, quantitative competency, analytic inquiry skills, ethical reasoning, the ability to engage diverse perspectives, and other program-specific learning outcomes.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Mt. SAC uses several criteria to determine the breadth, depth, rigor, sequencing, time to completion, and synthesis of learning for each program it offers.
  • There are several ways the College determines how well students are achieving the intended outcomes of a course or program.
  • Mt. SAC has established clear institutional outcomes that assess communication competency, information competency, quantitative competency, analytic inquiry skills, ethical reasoning, and the ability to engage diverse perspectives.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.B.2-2 AP4020 Program and Curriculum Development
II.A.1-3 Chancellor’s Office Program and Course Approval Handbook pg. 72-93
II.A.2-1 Academic Senate Content Review Plan
II.A.2-2 Academic Senate SLO Resolution 07-2011
II.A.3-3 State Academic Senate Curriculum Guide
II.A.3-6 Institutional Level Outcomes Map
II.A.4-3 BP4260 Prerequisites, Corequisites, and Advisories
II.A.4-5 Guidelines for Title 5 Regulations Section 55003 - Policies for Prerequisites, Corequisites, and Advisories
II.A.5-4 Advisory Committee Handbook pg. 4-5
II.A.11-1 Curriculum Review and Approval Process Document
II.A.11-2 ILOs Chair Training

II.A.12.

The institution requires of all of its degree programs a component of general education based on a carefully considered philosophy for both associate and baccalaureate degrees that is clearly stated in its catalog. The institution, relying on faculty expertise, determines the appropriateness of each course for inclusion in the general education curriculum, based upon student learning outcomes and competencies appropriate to the degree level. The learning outcomes include a student’s preparation for and acceptance of responsible participation in civil society, skills for lifelong learning and application of learning, and a broad comprehension of the development of knowledge, practice, and interpretive approaches in the arts and humanities, the sciences, mathematics, and social sciences.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

All Degree Programs have a Component of General Education (GE) that is in the College Catalog and has Relied on Faculty Expertise

Mt. San Antonio College’s (Mt. SAC’s) GE philosophy is clearly articulated in its catalog (I.A.4-1 pg. 45-46). This articulation includes the academic and personal growth purpose of GE course work in a higher education degree, the content categories of that course work, and the general goals of each of those categories. Faculty determine the appropriateness of each GE course for inclusion in a degree in a shared-governance process that comprises discipline standards, outcomes creation and assessment at the course, program (degree/certificate), and institutional levels and is driven by College policies that form the basis for a broad comprehension of knowledge, practice, and interpretive approaches in the arts, humanities, sciences, mathematics, and social sciences. Faculty develop curricula that includes the creation of student learning outcomes (SLOs) and program level outcomes (PLOs) that are linked to institutional level outcomes (ILOs). They follow both the Program and Course Approval Handbook (PCAH) 5th Edition and the local curriculum processes produced by the Educational Design Committee (EDC) and Curriculum & Instruction Council (C&I), which include considerations of inclusion of GE courses in degrees (II.A.1-3 pg. 143-144, II.A.2-5, II.A.12-1).

Standards and processes for the development and assessment of distance education (DL) courses are also embedded in this process and are subject to the same guidelines as traditional courses. All processes related to DL at Mt. SAC are driven by Administrative Procedure (AP) 4105 and the school’s Distance Learning Master Plan, as developed in consultation with the Distance Learning Committee, facilitated by the EDC, and overseen by the C&I (I.B.2-24, I.A.1-29, II.A.5-5, I.B.1-32, I.B.1-33). Additional quality guarantees for DL are reflected in the Skills and Pedagogy for Online Teaching required training offered by the Online Learning Support Center (II.A.5-6, II.A.5-7).

Learning Outcomes Include Civic Responsibility and Life-Long Learning

ILO #4 specifically addresses the issues of civic responsibility and life-long learning: personal, social, civic, and environmental responsibility: “Students demonstrate awareness and respect for personal, social, civic, and environmental responsibilities. Personal, social, civic, and environmental responsibility cross all disciplines and may include a variety of activities, such as: setting, evaluating, and monitoring academic, career, financial, and personal goals; interpreting and managing physical and mental health needs; developing self-awareness in the areas of personal development, learning styles, and decision-making strategies; recognizing and respecting the beliefs, opinions, and values of other individuals and cultures; being informed about and participating in local, state, national, and global communities; and evaluating environmental conservation and sustainability.”

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) requires of all of its degree programs a component of general education based on a carefully considered philosophy for its associate degrees that is clearly stated in its catalog. The College relies on faculty expertise to determine the appropriateness of each course for inclusion in the general education curriculum, based upon student learning outcomes and competencies. The learning outcomes include a student’s preparation for and acceptance of responsible participation in civil society, skills for lifelong learning and application of learning, and a broad comprehension of the development of knowledge, practice, and interpretive approaches in the arts and humanities, the sciences, mathematics, and social sciences, and noncredit programs.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Mt. SAC’s GE philosophy is clearly articulated in its catalog.
  • The appropriateness of each GE course for inclusion in a degree is determined by faculty in a shared-governance process.
  • Included is the basis for a broad comprehension of knowledge, practice, and interpretive approaches in the arts, humanities, sciences, mathematics, social sciences, and noncredit programs.
  • ILO #4 specifically addresses the issue of civic responsibility and life-long learning.
  • Standards and processes for the development and assessment of Distance Education (DL) courses are also imbedded in this process.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.A.1-29 Distance Learning Master Plan
I.A.4-1 Catalog 2016-17 pg. 45-46
I.B.1-32 Curriculum and Instruction Council Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.1-33 Educational Design Committee Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.2-24 AP4105 Distance Learning
II.A.1-3 Chancellor’s Office Program and Course Approval Handbook pg. 143-144
II.A.2-5 Educational Design Committee Deadlines and Curriculum Information
II.A.5-5 Distance Learning Committee Purpose, Function, and Members
II.A.5-6 Skills and Pedagogy for Online Teaching
II.A.5-7 Online Learning Support Center
II.A.12-1 General Education Course Evaluation Supplemental Form

II.A.13.

All degree programs include focused study in at least one area of inquiry or in an established interdisciplinary core. The identification of specialized courses in an area of inquiry or interdisciplinary core is based upon student learning outcomes and competencies, and include mastery, at the appropriate degree level, of key theories and practices within the field of study.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) offers 89 Associate degrees which provide students with the focused knowledge and skills needed to earn a degree, transfer to a four-year university, or prepare for employment. Students may earn a degree when they complete courses in general education and an area of inquiry and meet competencies. Students can earn Associate in Arts (A.A.), Associate in Science (A.S.), or Associate for Transfer (A.A.-T/A.S.-T) degrees. The A.A.-T and A.S.-T degrees are designed to provide students with a seamless transfer to the California State University system. (I.A.4-1 pg. 54-120, II.A.13-1, II.A.13-2). The analysis of competencies, which for Career Technical Education courses includes input from advisory committees, results in specialized courses being identified in each degree program.

Programs are required to align their program level outcomes (PLOs) with course student learning outcomes (SLOs) and institutional level outcomes (ILOs). Outcomes mapping documents have been created for all degrees and certificates. In addition to alignment of outcomes, learning of key theories and practices is indicated on the mapping documents as the level of learning. The Educational Design Committee and the Curriculum and Instruction Council review and make recommendations about programs and courses, including the assessment of learning outcomes and appropriateness of course and degree levels (I.A.4-1 pg. 45-51, 121-175, II.A.13-3, I.B.2-2).

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) degree programs allow students to master a focused area of study while also engaging in general education, thereby preparing students for employment or transfer to a four-year university. The identification of specialized courses in an area of inquiry or interdisciplinary core is based upon SLOs and competencies and includes mastery of key theories and practices within the field of study. Curriculum review and learning outcomes assessment ensure courses assigned to degrees are appropriate in content and level.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • All Mt. SAC degree programs include focused knowledge and skills in an area of inquiry.
  • The identification of specialized courses is based upon student learning outcomes and competencies.
  • Faculty create the specific course elements, including learning outcomes and program level outcomes that indicate the level of mastery of key theories and practices.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.A.4-1 Catalog 2016-17 pg. 54-120
I.A.4-1 Catalog 2016-17 pg. 45-51, 121-175
I.B.2-2 AP4020 Program and Curriculum Development
II.A.13-1 AP4100 Graduation Requirements for Degrees and Certificates
II.A.13-2 BP4025 Philosophy and Criteria for Associate Degree and General Education
II.A.13-3 Mapping Document for Television Production A.S. Degree

II.A.14.

Graduates completing career-technical certificates and degrees demonstrate technical and professional competencies that meet employment standards and other applicable standards and preparation for external licensure and certification.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

The processes by which Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) Career Technical Education (CTE) degrees and certificates ensure competency is grounded in the College mission. The mission is specifically reflected in College Goal #2: “The College will improve career/vocational training opportunities to help students maintain professional currency and achieve individual goals” and College Goal # 13 “The College will improve the quality of its partnerships with business and industry, the community, and other educational institutions.”

Virtually all credit CTE programs, as well as some noncredit vocational programs, that require licensure prepare their students to take the exam. For most of those programs, such as those noted in the table that require accreditation, the licensing exam is taken after the curriculum is completed. Noncredit and fee-based vocational programs, such as Certified Nursing Programs, Phlebotomy, and Water Technology, offer appropriate coursework containing professional and technical competencies. Upon completion of these short-term programs, students must take an exam to gain state licensing.

In some programs, such as Real Estate, which requires a license, and Sign Language Interpreting, which has national certification but does not require a license, certification and licensing are not part of the curriculum. In other disciplines, such as the arts, including Animation and Graphic Design, there are no licensure exams since competency is based on the professional review of student portfolios. In several traditional programs, students prepare for direct employment after graduation while in others, such as Electronics Technology, students prepare either for initial employment or for transfer to California State University programs.

Faculty work together with local and regional advisory committees, external licensing and credentialing agencies, and industry experts to establish competencies and learning outcomes for programs (II.A.5-4). Many of Mt. SAC’s programs are accredited by outside agencies.

Table II.A.14.-1. Program Accreditation

Program Accrediting Body Link
Air Conditioning and Refrigeration, A.S. Degree Partnership for Air-Conditioning, Heating, Refrigeration Accreditation (PAHRA). I.C.1-27
Airframe & Aircraft Powerplant Maintenance Technology, A.S. Degree Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) I.C.1-28
The Alcohol and Drug Counseling, A.S. Degree California Association for Alcohol/Drug Educators I.C.1-29
Certified Nursing Assistant State of California, Health & Human Services, Department of Public Health, Licensing & Certification Section I.C.1-30
Emergency Medical Services, A.S. Degree Committee on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) I.C.1-31
Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic Program Committee on Accreditation of EMS Programs (CoAEMSP) and Committee on Accreditation of Allied Health Programs (CAAHEP) I.C.1-32
Fire Technology, A.S. Degree Regionally Accredited Training Program (ARTP). The Office of the State Fire Marshal (OSFM) has a responsibility for accreditation of ARTP's throughout the State of California. I.C.1-33
Histologic Training Program National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS) I.C.1-34
Interior Design, A.S. Degree National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA) Accreditation I.C.1-35
Mental Health Technology Psychiatric Technician, A.S. Degree Board of Vocational Nursing and Psychiatric Technicians I.C.1-36
Licensed Vocational Nurse to RN. A.S. and Nursing, A.S. Degree California Board of Registered Nursing (BRN) I.C.1-37
Psychiatric Technician to RN, A.S. Degree California Board of Registered Nursing I.C.1-38
Phlebotomy Program State of California, Health & Human Services, Department of Public Health, Licensing & Certification I.C.1-39
Radiologic Technology. A.S. Degree The Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT) I.C.1-40
The Registered Veterinary Technology, A.S. Degree American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) I.C.1-41
Respiratory Therapy. A.S. Degree Western Association of Schools and Colleges, the State Department of Education, and the Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC) I.C.1-42
School of Continuing Education Accrediting Commission for Schools, Western Association of Schools and Colleges (ACS WASC) I.C.1-43

Some programs are affiliated or approved but not accredited. In these programs standards are established by outside affiliations:

  • Athletic Trainer Aide – National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA)
  • Fitness Professionals – American College of Sports medicine (ACSM)
  • Coaching – California Interscholastic Federation (CIF)
  • Paralegal – American Bar Association (ABA)

Faculty use accrediting and licensure standards to create course and program student learning outcomes (SLOs). As an example, course exams in the Registered Veterinary Technology (Vet Tech) program are written to prepare the students for the Veterinary Technician's National Exam (VTNE). The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) provides guidelines for program and course curriculum development and also suggests textbooks relevant to VTNE exam content. Mt. SAC faculty have chosen to design the Vet Tech program using these resources in the Course Outline of Record as well as in course assessments. Vet Tech SLOs reference the VTNE (II.A.14-1). The Veterinary Medical Board exam report provided to Mt. SAC gives evidence of student successful preparation in the different categories of the exam. This data is used to update program exams and course content as needed.

At the division level, the Technology and Health Division monitors licensure pass rates for eight Career and Technical Education programs (II.A.1-9). Program directors update this document each year with the data provided to them by their licensing boards. Programs use this data to measure the impact of their efforts to insure student preparation to meet industry standards. The programs use licensure pass rates as the assessment tool for program level outcomes (PLOs); in particular, they use the boards’ summary reports, which break down student performance into critical categories, to pinpoint and address areas of weakness at the course level. This may be accomplished through the adjustment of instructional techniques, additional review measures, etc. An example of this occurred in the Respiratory Therapy program where faculty looked at the 80 percent licensure pass rate and breakdown of scores in critical components in 2012-13 and decided to make changes to instructional methodologies and begin employing student success interventions such as supplemental instructors in their skills lab. The pass rates grew in 2013-14 and 2014-15, reaching 95.65 percent in 2016. In addition, programs now discuss the appropriateness of the institution-set standards. For example, the institution-set standard for the Nursing program licensure pass rate is 75 percent. However, the pass rate has been steadily climbing (i.e. 82 percent in 12-13 and 85.71 percent in 2016). In light of this information, the program may choose to discuss a revision to the institution-set standard through the appropriate College processes. Other examples include:

  • Air Conditioning and Refrigeration: Course SLOs are based upon the Uniform Mechanical Code organization exam (IA.8-2).
  • Nursing: Administers the Predictor Exit Exam at the end of the program for the measurement of SLOs. This levels program curriculum and facilitates transition from course to course (IA.8-3).
  • Welding: The Welding 70C-3 course SLO criteria for success is that 75 percent of students will pass the L.A. City Department of Building and Safety written exam for Structural Steel Welder certification with a score of 70 percent or better (IA.8-4).

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) graduates completing career-technical certificates and degrees demonstrate technical and professional competencies that meet employment standards and other applicable standards and preparation for external licensure and certification.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • The processes by which Mt. SAC CTE degrees and certificates ensure competency is based on the College mission.
  • Virtually all CTE programs that require licensure prepare their students to take the exam.
  • Faculty work together with local and regional advisory committees, external licensing and credentialing agencies, and industry experts to establish competencies and learning outcomes for programs.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.C.1-27 Air Cond & Refrigeration A.S. Degree, Partnership for AC/Heat/Refrig Accreditation (PAHRA)
I.C.1-28 Catalog 2016 -17 - Accreditation - Aviation
I.C.1-29 Catalog 2016 -17 - Accreditation - Drug and Alcohol Counseling
I.C.1-30 Certified Nursing Asst, Calif Health & Human Svcs Dept of Public Health, Licensing & Certification Section
I.C.1-31 Emergency Medical Services A.S. Degree, Committee on Accreditation of Allied Health Ed Programs (CAAHEP)
I.C.1-32 Catalog 2016 -17 - Accreditation - Paramedic
I.C.1-33 Catalog 2016 -17 - Accreditation - Fire Tech.
I.C.1-34 Catalog 2016 -17 - Accreditation - Histology
I.C.1-35 Catalog 2016 -17 - Accreditation - Interior Design
I.C.1-36 Mental Health Technology Psychiatric Technician A.S. Degree, Board of Vocational Nursing and Psychiatric Technicians
I.C.1-37 Catalog 2016 -17 - Accreditation - Nursing
I.C.1-38 Catalog 2016 -17 - Accreditation - Psychiatric Tech
I.C.1-39 Phlebotomy Program, CA. Health & Human Svcs Dept of Public Health Licensing & Certification
I.C.1-40 Catalog 2016 -17 - Accreditation - Radiologic Tech
I.C.1-41 Catalog 2016 -17 - Accreditation - Veterinary Tech
I.C.1-42 Catalog 2016 -17 - Accreditation - Respiratory Therapy
I.C.1-43 School of Continuing Education ACS WASC
II.A.1-9 Licensure Exam Pass Rates 2013-14
II.A.5-4 Advisory Committee Handbook
II.A.8-2 AIRC: Course SLOs Based Upon Exam
II.A.8-3 Nursing: Administers the Predictor Exit Exam
II.A.8-4 Welding: L.A. City Department of Building and Safety Written Exam
II.A.14-1 Vet Tech SLO

II.A.15.

When programs are eliminated or program requirements are significantly changed, the institution makes appropriate arrangements so that enrolled students may complete their education in a timely manner with a minimum of disruption.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

Student Rights

Students who enroll in programs at Mt. San Antonio College (Mt SAC) and remain continuously enrolled during spring and fall semesters have catalog rights. This guarantees them the option of fulfilling program requirements listed in either the current catalog or the catalog requirements for the year they entered the College. If a program is discontinued or significantly changed while students retain catalog rights to that program, the College has processes in place to assist the student. The change is published in the catalog and counselors and program faculty directly assist students. If the program requirements are changed and the previously required courses are unavailable, counselors and department faculty work with students to identify a substitute course(s) and authorize a variance for the course(s) substitution (II.A.15-1). If a program is discontinued, the change is published in the catalog. Students receive formal notification of the program discontinuance through the catalog, but also receive individual assistance and guidance from program faculty and counselors. If programs are discontinued, enrollment into the program is suspended but current students are allowed to continue in the program for two years or until the last student completes the requirements, whichever comes first. Mt. SAC will support low enrolled courses to facilitate program completion and ensure completion for all impacted students. 

Process for Program Discontinuance

Mt SAC has a process for program discontinuance in place (II.A.15-2). The process is based on continuous program review and evaluation. The annual program review process, Planning for Institutional Effectiveness (PIE), is completed by all instructional programs. Data is provided to allow detailed and meaningful analysis of program and course completion, scheduling patterns, program enrollments, transfer, board pass rates, and identification of program needs. Annual program PIE's are reviewed by division deans, where program strengths and weaknesses are analyzed. These summaries are then reviewed by the Vice President of Instruction. If programs are identified as potentially at-risk due to emerging data, trends, or factors not included in the original program assessment, further analysis and conversations with the dean and faculty occur. This annual review serves as the first step in identification of at risk programs (II.A.15-3). If a program receives an at risk designation, data has shown the demand, completion, transfer, employment, retention, and success rates have not met expected goals or diminished. It may also mean that the program is unable to offer enough sections to allow students to complete the program of study within a two-year period.

Once the faculty or division dean designate a program as at risk, Mt SAC has a process in place to further analyze program risks and possible solutions. Program faculty and administrators form a task force to develop an intervention or revitalization plan. The plan may include strategies for recruitment, collaboration with local partners, enhanced intrusive counseling and career advisement, analysis of course scheduling and program demographics, curriculum changes, budget needs, or discontinuance steps. If discontinuance is recommended, plans are included for faculty retraining or reassignment, student completion, and possible movement of course content to noncredit or community service. The complete plan is to span no more than two years. Department faculty and division administrators review and approve the revitalization plan (II.A.15-4).

Once approved, this plan is forwarded to the Academic Mutual Agreement Council (AMAC), where the President and Vice President of the Academic Senate meet and confer with the Vice Presidents of Student Services and Instruction. AMAC reviews the plans, recommends an outcome, and stipulates metrics that will bring the program off of at risk status. The department faculty and division administrators are responsible for implementation and provide quarterly progress reports to AMAC. The most recent program placed on at risk status, Paramedic, successfully implemented a revitalization plan and is no longer deemed at risk as its enrollment and student completion rates are growing steadily (II.A.15-5).

Analysis and Evaluation

When programs are eliminated or program requirements are significantly changed at Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC), the College makes appropriate arrangements so that students may complete their education in a timely manner with a minimum of disruption.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • Mt. SAC's Administrative Procedure 4021 defines the process of discontinuing programs.
  • Students are notified of program discontinuance through the catalog and receive individual counseling and guidance from program faculty and counselors.
  • Past practice has been to create successful revitalization plans where possible, thus maintaining the program with renewed success.
  • If discontinuance occurs, current students continue the program for up to two years or until the last student has completed.

List of Evidence

Title Content
II.A.15-1 Program Inactivation Form
II.A.15-2 AP4021 At-Risk Programs and Program Discontinuance
II.A.15-3 At-Risk Program Example
II.A.15-4 Discontinuance Program Plan Example
II.A.15-5 EMS Department Minutes

II.A.16.

The institution regularly evaluates and improves the quality and currency of all instructional programs offered in the name of the institution, including collegiate, pre-collegiate, career-technical, and continuing and community education courses and programs, regardless of delivery mode or location. The institution systematically strives to improve programs and courses to enhance learning outcomes and achievement for students.

Evidence of Meeting the Standard

There are several processes, activities, and groups that are institutionalized at Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) to ensure evaluation and improvement of course and program quality. An institutional commitment to academic standards, currency, and systematic review and improvement of instructional courses and programs is evident through the Institutional Effectiveness Committee’s (IEC) commitment to review mechanisms of instructional improvement, the Academic Senate Content Review Implementation Plan, the Academic Senate support for student learning outcomes (SLOs) and program level outcomes (PLOs), Administrative Procedure (AP) 4020 Curriculum and Program Development, and the Mt. SAC Curriculum Review and Approval Process (II.A.2-1, II.A.2-2, II.A.2-3, I.B.2-2, II.A.11-1 pg. 143-144, II.A.3-3).

The commitment and guidelines are operationalized in several ways, including the Outcomes Committee, which is a shared governance committee designed to monitor, coordinate, and evaluate outcomes efforts across the College (I.B.5-9). The use of assessment results for SLOs, PLOs, and institutional level outcomes (ILOs) is the primary process by which program quality is ensured. Outcomes are established based on a general and systematic institutional commitment, including a reimagining of General Education Outcomes to return to a competency-based structure, resulting in the creation of PLOs and ILOs (I.A.1-30, I.B.4-7, II.A.3-7, II.A.3-8 pg. 3-5, II.A.11-2). Learning outcomes are mapped to the broader PLOs and ILOs (II.A.3-6). As course SLOs are assessed and mapped to PLOs, departments evaluate the effectiveness of their programs and make modifications to courses and programs as needed to improve achievement for students.

The Educational Design Committee (EDC) facilitates a four-year review process of course and program content, quality, and modes of delivery (I.B.1-33). This review includes distance learning, noncredit, community education, and fee-based offerings. EDC’s work is recorded in its online system WebCMS and described on its webpage (I.C.3-1, II.A.2-1). The Outcomes Committee and Curriculum & Instruction Council (C&I) are responsible for ensuring a systematic assessment of SLOs (II.A.3-16, I.B.1-32). C&I is a shared governance group that further reviews the courses and programs ensuring appropriateness of the curriculum process to the mission, goals, and the overall program priorities of the College.

The Planning for Institutional Effectiveness (PIE) program review process also illustrates a commitment to academic standards, currency, and systematic review and improvement of instructional courses and programs. Each instructional department and division engages in a comprehensive, annual planning process that includes the deliberate consideration of how instructional programs can be improved in order to optimize student success (I.B.2-4). A significant portion of the planning includes faculty discussion of course and program outcomes in relation to the development of new programs and the enhancement of existing programs through requests for new faculty, new technology, and new facilities. Much of this discussion occurs within department and division meetings, especially in relation to how to use the results of SLO and PLO assessments (II.A.16-1).

Mt. SAC’s curriculum review process, described in AP 4020, requires all course outlines and learning outcomes to be reviewed for quality and currency and approved by C&I at least once every four years to remain active. If courses are not updated within this time period, there is a process for deactivation and removal from the catalog. Every September, faculty members are notified of which courses are overdue (II.A.2-5). If the courses are not submitted by May 31 faculty members are asked to propose deactivation of the course. If rationale is provided, limited additional time is provided for course submission and review. Board Policy 4260 requires prerequisites, co-requisites, and advisories be reviewed every six years. For Career Technical Education (CTE) programs, there is a required two-year program review process that includes input from advisory committees to ensure quality and currency of course offerings and instruction and that program outcomes match desired industry competencies (II.A.1-3). The Chancellor’s Office also requires a five-year review cycle for all Transfer Model Curriculum (TMC) and Associate Degrees for Transfer (ADT). Departments participate in state-wide review of TMCs and local review and updating of ADTs as part of this process. All curricula and programs, regardless of credit status (e.g., credit or noncredit) and delivery mode, are created through the same process and assessed through the same program outcomes process (II.A.16-2).

AP 4105 Distance Learning was revised by the Academic Senate and accepted by the President’s Advisory Council in September 2016 (II.A.16-3). It clarifies the approval and review process for distance learning (DL) courses and identifies best practices for regular and effective contact to enhance learning outcomes and achievements for students. Professional and Organizational Development provides regular trainings and faculty-specific course offerings to improve the quality of instruction in DL courses (II.A.16-4).

Analysis and Evaluation

Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) regularly evaluates and improves the quality and currency of all instructional programs offered regardless of delivery mode or location. The College systematically strives to improve programs and courses to enhance learning outcomes and achievement for students.

Accomplishments and Outcomes

  • There are several processes, activities, and groups that are institutionalized at Mt. SAC to ensure evaluation and improvement of course and program quality.
  • The commitment and guidelines are operationalized in several ways.
  • The Planning for Institutional Effectiveness (PIE) program review process also illustrates Mt. SAC’s commitment to evaluating and improving the quality and currency of all instructional programs.
  • The use of outcomes is the primary process by which program quality is ensured.

List of Evidence

Title Content
I.A.1-30 Outcomes Plan 2012-2020
I.B.1-32 Curriculum and Instruction Council Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.1-33 Educational Design Committee Purpose, Function, and Members
I.B.2-2 AP4020 Program and Curriculum Development
I.B.2-4 Students Guide to Learning Outcomes Fall 2015
I.B.4-7 Outcomes Committee Annual Report 2014
I.B.5-9 Outcomes Committee Purpose, Function, and Members
I.C.3-1 WebCMS Webpage
II.A.1-3 Chancellor’s Office Program and Course Approval Handbook
II.A.2-1 Academic Senate Content Review Plan
II.A.2-2 Academic Senate SLO Resolution 07-2011
II.A.2-3 Academic Senate PLO Resolution 06-2013
II.A.2-5 Educational Design Committee Deadlines and Curriculum Information
II.A.3-3 State Academic Senate Curriculum Guide
II.A.3-6 Institutional Level Outcomes
II.A.3-7 Outcomes Committee - General Education Outcomes Re-Imagined PowerPoint
II.A.3-8 Outcomes Committee - General Education Outcomes Re-Imagined Report pg. 3-5
II.A.3-16 Example of SLO Rotation Plan - Learning Assistance
II.A.11-1 Curriculum Review and Approval Process Document pg. 143-144
II.A.11-2 ILOs Chair Training
II.A.16-1 Business Division Minutes 09-15-16
II.A.16-2 EDC WebCMS Forms
II.A.16-3 AP4105 Distance Learning
II.A.16-4 POD Distance Learning